High School Students Receive CDA Credential

The 2015 graduating cohort from Tuba City High School in Arizona gathers for a photo with their Child Development Associate Certificates.

The 2015 graduating cohort from Tuba City High School in Arizona gathers for a photo with their Child Development Associate Certificates.

This year, eight students at Tuba City High School graduated with their Childhood Development Associate (CDA) credentials as part of a dual enrollment program with Coconino Community College.

Tuba City, Arizona, the Navajo Nation’s largest community, received funding for this program through the U.S. Department of Education’s “Promoting Rigorous Career and Technical Education Programs of Study” program. Tuba City High School is the third school in the nation to award this credential to high school students.

Arizona is one of six states that participated in the “Promoting Rigorous Career and Technical Education Programs of Study” initiative, a four-year project that sought to design, implement, and study the effects of rigorous CTE programs that incorporate the 10 key components of OCTAE’s Program of Study Design Framework and compare the results across urban, suburban, and rural settings.

Over the course of the Tuba City program, students are required to complete almost 500 hours of fieldwork, a professional portfolio, an online national assessment, and 24 credit hours of college-level coursework in the Early Childhood Education (ECE) field. Finally, students are observed in the classroom for 3.5 hours by a trained CDA development specialist.

Maria Goatcher–Tuba City High School’s CDA program coordinator–says, “CDA Certification prepares ECE students for college or employment after high school graduation. The program provides students with career choices in postsecondary education and the workplace.”

Jazmin Greyeyes, Sydney Tsinigine, Raini Daw, Sydney Holiday, Ambrielle Begay, Michel Yazzie, Cheynaea Curtis, and Audre Humetewa are the second cohort to graduate from Tuba City High School’s Early Childhood Education Program with their CDA. The CDA is a nationally-recognized credential in the Early Childhood Education field and provides these students with college credit, experience with elevated academic rigor, and the first step in pursuing other credentials, such as a four-year degree and/or teaching licensure.

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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

Barbershops Cutting Into the Achievement Gap for #ReadWhereYouAre

This article is cross-posted from the Department of Education’s Homeroom Blog.

As we celebrate, engage and Read Where You Are today, you might see tweets, Instagram and Facebook posts already on “newsfeeds” with great photos of reading in barbershops. What you might not know, and I am proud to share, is how this all began – when the Department of Education starting chatting with barbers about how we can use all of our tools, scissors included, to cut the achievement gap. At a meeting earlier this year about the importance of summer literacy, a colleague smartly mentioned a need to engage everyone in the community. Our brainstorming left us with a long list, and a colleague specifically mentioned barbershops knowing the important role they play in communities across our country, and especially in communities of color. I immediately thought of a friend, who also happens to be a barbershop owner from Washington Heights in New York City who has made it his priority to give back to his clients, their families and the larger community. As we often do in meetings, I took my “next steps” and reached out to my friend, excited about what could be in store. My work at ED is rooted in who I am, as a student, mentor, tutor, Posse Scholar and American raised in a working class neighborhood in Brooklyn. Having grown up around beauty salons and barbershops, I know what happens there and what’s been happening since has the potential to make a very big difference. In fact, my mother is a hair stylist and has worked in the field for decades.

On June 29, thanks to some truly remarkable small-business barbershop owners, staff from the Department listened and learned with a group of over twenty barbershop owners from around the country who happened to be in Washington, D.C. for an industry event, a hair battle. Our conversation was about how to understand how barbershops can do more to help the students and kids we all care about, how barbers as individuals could be empowered, and how barbers can make a difference.

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National FFA Awards $2.7 Million to Students

In 1984, sixteen FFA members received the first awards given through the newly established collegiate scholarship program. In the 31 years since then, National FFA has given more than $41 million in scholarships.  These scholarships are provided by businesses and individuals through the National FFA Foundation to reward and encourage excellence and enable students to pursue their educational goals.

This year, National FFA awarded more than $2.7 million in scholarships to 2,158 students. Over 80% of these students are attending four-year universities in the fall, and 63% of the scholarship winners are female. The winners included 313 high school valedictorians.

The infographic below provides an overview of the 2015 scholarship recipients. You can also download a PDF of the graphic here.

FFA Infographic

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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

White House Celebrates CTE Students and Teachers

First Lady Michelle Obama gave the keynote address at “Celebrating Innovations in Career and Technical Education,” a White House event on Tuesday, June 30.  Students, teachers, exemplary programs, and career and technical student organizations that have distinguished accomplishments were recognized at this event for awards that they have received within the past year.

Twenty six students and teachers were recognized by the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) and the National Coordinating Council for Career and Technical Student Organizations (NCC-CTSOs) as National CTE Innovators for their excellence, dedication, leadership, and innovation in career and technical education. Full biographies of these winners are available at www.acteonline.org.

Five CTE programs were recognized in the Excellence in Action category, an honor awarded by the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium.  Information on these programs is available at www.careertech.org.

Additionally, sixteen national officers and representatives from the career and technical student organizations (CTSOs) were also recognized for their service. These organizations serve a combined membership of over two million students across the country.

The First Lady noted that the Department of Education will soon be launching a series of prize competitions, joining forces with America’s solvers to help students compete in our global economy. Through these innovation challenges, ED seeks to spur the development of new technology, products and resources that will prepare students for the high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand occupations of tomorrow. For more information about these challenges and to sign up to receive further updates as they are announced, please visit http://www.edprizes.com.

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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

Request for Comments on WIOA Performance Information Collection

The Departments of Labor and Education are soliciting comments concerning a collection of data that will be used to demonstrate that specified performance levels under the WIOA have been achieved. The WIOA Performance Management, Information, and Reporting System fulfills requirements in section 116(d) (1) of the act for the development of report templates for 1) the State Performance Report for WIOA’s six core programs; 2) the Local Area Performance Report for the three Title I programs; and 3) the Eligible Training Provider Report for the Title I Adult and Dislocated Worker programs.

A copy of the proposed Information Collection Request with applicable supporting documentation may be accessed at http://www.regulations.gov by selecting Docket ID number ETA-2015-0007. The comment period is open for 60 days and closes on September 21, 2015. Any comments not received through the processes outlined in the Federal Register will not be considered by the departments.

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Acting Assistant Secretary, OCTAE

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act – One-Year Anniversary

Last Wednesday marked one year since the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) was signed into law by President Obama. OCTAE sent a special anniversary message to our State Directors. That message included a video from Secretaries Duncan and Perez who jointly commemorated the anniversary of WIOA’s passage. We wanted to share these messages with all of you.

Integrating Employability Skills: A Framework for All Educators

On Thursday, July 16, 2015, the College and Career Readiness and Success (CCRS) Center, in partnership with the Center on Great Teachers and Leaders (GTL) and RTI International, released Integrating Employability Skills: A Framework for All Educators. This professional learning module—a collection of customizable, train-the-trainer materials—is designed to support regional comprehensive centers, state educational agency staff, adult education programs, and state regional centers in building their knowledge and capacity to integrate and prioritize employability skills at the state and local levels.

The module includes PowerPoint slides, handouts, a sample agenda, a workbook, tools for individuals or state work groups, and a facilitator’s guide designed to accomplish the following:

  • Introduce participants to the Employability Skills Framework and its importance
  • Connect employability skills with other education initiatives
  • Provide tools and strategies to prioritize employability skills at all levels

For more information about the module and to view the CCRS Center’s guidelines for use, please visit their website here.

To learn more about the Employability Skills Framework itself, please visit its homepage.

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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

FCCLA Celebrates 70 Years

The Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) held its 2015 National Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. from July 6th– 9th  at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

The Opening General Session featured an introduction by Mark Mitsui, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Community Colleges at OCTAE. He recognized three FCCLA initiatives: “FCCLA at the Table,” through which members pledged to share a sit-down meal with their families, and more than 70,000 such meals were pledged; participation in the First Lady’s “Let’s Move!” campaign; and their involvement with food bank volunteering efforts, demonstrated by the more than 1,100 pounds of non-perishable food items collected at the conference and donated to local charity, Food For Others.

To promote the conference theme, Together We are Healthy, FCCLA members danced on the Capitol lawn.

To promote the conference theme, Together We are Healthy, FCCLA members danced on the Capitol lawn.

FCCLA also practiced the “Gimme 5 Dance”–made famous by the First Lady’s appearance on the Ellen DeGeneres Show– in preparation for their visit to the Capitol Building on Wednesday morning. Gimme 5 is the latest initiative in the First Lady’s “Let’s Move!” program to fight childhood obesity, which coincides with the FCCLA National Leadership Conference’s theme of “Together We Are Healthy.”

The conference drew more than 7,700 students, advisers, and alumni from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in their signature red jackets to celebrate and connect with each other.

After the singing the national anthem and cheering for the presentation of state flags, students were addressed by their National Officers, the FCCLA Executive Director Sandy Spavone, and Muriel Bowser, Mayor of the District of Columbia, among others.

FCCLA student members rally in Washington, DC to celebrate FCCLA 70th year.

FCCLA student members rally in Washington, DC to celebrate FCCLA’s 70th year as an organization.

FCCLA dates back to 1945 when it operated as the Future Homemakers of America before merging with the New Homemakers of America (NHA) and Home Economics Related Occupations (HERO). Student members participate in CTE programs at their high schools and have the opportunity to compete in a wide variety of events at regional meetings.

On July 8th, Laura Taylor, 2014-15 National President, announced through Twitter that #2015NLC is the number 3 trending hashtag on Instagram. Another student member tweeted, “I love FCCLA Conferences. It’s like a 7,500 family reunion.” For more information about FCCLA, please visit its website here.

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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

Department of Energy Hosts Mentoring Cafes in STEM Career Initiative

This article is cross-posted on the Department of Energy’s website.

What career are you thinking about that you might’ve not thought about before?

“Science engineering”

What did you learn today?

“To never give up because nothing is impossible, so put your skills to the test.”

Based on your visit today, has your interest in science, technology, engineering or mathematics increased?

“Yes,” from over 30 participants.

These were just some of the responses of 40 middle school girls from Tampa Public Housing Authority who got a glimpse of what it’s like to work in science, technology, engineering and mathematics — or STEM — at the Museum of Science and Industry on Saturday, June 13.

As part of the Department of Energy’s STEM Mentoring Café program, these middle schoolers spent the day touring the museum, engaging in hands-on activities, and meeting real scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians. The theme of the day was STEM Careers and Connections to Climate Change, empowering girls to get sparked by STEM, stick with it, and set their minds to their future.

To help inspire and motivate these girls, STEM professionals from NASA Kennedy Space Center, the Lowry Park Zoo, Verizon, and Tampa Electric Company volunteered their time to explore STEM with them. These mentors helped to bring to life the impact that STEM research has on everyday life and could have on these students’ futures. Annie Caraccio, a chemical engineer at NASA, spent her time providing examples of how the work of engineers at NASA has led to several inventions — including the microwave. Other mentors encouraged the girls to continue their education and seek out opportunities.

The Museum of Science and Industry also captivated the girls’ attention and sparked their curiosity. “I wish I could come back every day!” one wrote. “The museum is a place where you can find out what you want to do when you grow up,” said another.

STEM Mentoring Cafes are being launched around the country, and programs like this one can be the inspiration girls need to pursue STEM more seriously, such as through enrolling in a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program in high school or pursuing a degree in a STEM field in college.

Click on these links to read more about the Mentoring Cafes and to visit the Department of Energy’s original post.

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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

Making a Shift in the Public Workforce System

This article is cross-posted on the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services website, the Department of Labor’s WIOA website, and the Department of Health and Human Services’ website.

Today, July 1, 2015, marks the day that many of the provisions of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) take effect. This new law has the potential to make a tremendous difference for tens of millions of workers, jobseekers and students across this country. WIOA’s transformation of our publicly-funded workforce system means that all of us—federal and state partners, governments, non-profits and educational and training institutions, must be pressing for innovations to ensure:

  • the needs of business and workers drive our workforce solutions
  • one-stop centers, also known as American Job Centers (AJCs) provide excellent customer service to both jobseekers and employers and focus on continuous improvement; and
  • the workforce system supports strong regional economies and plays an active role in community and economic development.

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Photo of Johan Uvin
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Acting Assistant Secretary, OCTAE