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Draft National Education Technology Plan 2010

 

“By 2020, America will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world.”

 

—President Barack Obama, Address to Congress, February 24, 2009

 


Click here for an accessible version of the video.
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Executive Summary PDF
National Ed Tech Plan PDF
National Ed Tech Plan ePub
NIMAS (Large - 300dpi)
NIMAS (Normal - 72dpi)
UDL Excerpt
Downloads and information regarding all of the NETP accessible formats.


Welcome to the draft of the National Education Technology Plan. We encourage you to host discussion groups with various stakeholders and look forward to your comments, ideas, and links to appropriate videos, stories and research. Commenting is available at the bottom of each page, enabling you to provide comments within the context of the plan and we will make this feature available for the next sixty days. Thank you.
Please click here to review ED.gov comments policy.

 

UPDATE: Thanks to everyone who has commented on the plan over the past sixty days. On Friday, May 14th at 5PM EDT, we will close the public commenting on this website and update the National Education Technology Plan draft.

 

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Comments

As a physician who takes care of children with Down syndrome and other disabilities, I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments.

As a school psychologist with a background in technology, I agree with Brian's comment. As more students are included in regular education classrooms, the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), if effectively implemented, will provide opportunities for students with a range of abilities and disabilities.

This is important, given the high numbers of young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. Many of these students will be approaching their middle school and high school years soon.

Unfortunately, with budget cuts, many classrooms at the high school level in some regions have 35 or more students. Hopefully UDL principles will assist teachers, particularly those in co-teaching "inclusion" classrooms, help meet the needs of students with disabilities, even with larger class sizes.

As a parent to a child with Down Syndrome I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments.

As the parent of a child with downs syndrome who looks forward to a productive and self supporting future, allow me to add my voice to those who thank the NETP for recognizing the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments.

UDL will help all students get the supports and challenges they need to succeed and provide educators with the
resources to teach every child, whether he or she is an English language learner, is gifted or has a disability.

Thank you,

I can't see all the content on this page. You may think
my browser is broken because it doesn't play flash,
but I claim your page is broken. I'm sure the page
doesn't meet accessibility guidelines, because
there is no alternative view to the missing content.
(A "youtube" video, someone has said)

The web accessibility regulations that are being referenced here are specific to Section 508 Subpart A § 1194.1 (part of the amended Rehabilitation Act).

This will be a challenge for all education and use of web content.

Hi, This website is exciting and stresses the importance of connecting families and educators through tecnologies.

http://futurelab.org.uk/resources/documents/handbooks/home-school_relati...

As a parent of a child with an IEP, I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments

As a father of a child with a develpmental disability, I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments

Please support the UDL plan and help students with special needs such as Down Syndrome prepare for life as a active and productive adult. They are capable of learing many things but need more time and resources to achieve their full pontential.
Thanks.
Howard

a thought, as measurments of what kids are learning gets better - and we can link data such as what products a child uses, as well as what parts they use, and what they learn from such products ...etc..etc... can be tied to how certain children are doing in school - and eventually in life (by linking other data - but thats a whole other discussion)

we can effectivley determine if the use of certain products - wheather they be video games - or what not - actually lead to better understanding of material.

if we make it easy for companies to prove that they have had a positive effect on a students learning

and they can prove it - shouldnt they be rewarded both financially and via recognition.

Doing so takes the power of learning and provides incentives for companies to pursue he development of the childs mind.

why not do this?

One idea:

The success of the x-prize is rather facinating - both in the drive and enthusiam is creates in all types of developers and creators of great things, wheather they be machine, or computer, the x-prize concept has been shown to be such a powerful motivator for jump starting progress in a variety of areas.

Education is also a vital interest of the goverment - if it does not thrive, nor do our kids, and as a result - our country flounders yet again.

I do not believe we can accept this any more.

Technology - with its fasts development that is growing exponentially - has vast - even unforseen powers to revolutionize education and the experiences of students across the globe.

Why not find ways to create certain "outcome based prizes" much like the x-prize for education The goverment has not typically been involved in such fashion, but why not...if it can be a better way to spend tax dollars and produce an effective outcome for education - why not find a talented group of people to sit down down and to figure out what sort of role such a program might have in advancing education without hindering it.

i reference a TEd talk by the creator of the X-prize, during witch he gives a very easy to understand explanation of how the economics of the x-prize work and why they are more efficient.

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/peter_diamandis_on_our_next_giant_leap...

I am concerned that the plan will not help raise the bar. It is full of the latest Education buzz words like a commerical about technology. However, in 112 pages there is but one mention of COMPUTER SCIENCE and in the past tense as a reference, not as something students should learn as part of STEM.

We have a crisis in America with students NOT having the opportunity to learn any depth about technology. There is no call for articulation between K12 and higher Ed to develop programs that help provide our children with the best technology education in the world. This will not happen with the watered down 21st century skills.

See the recent journal Article about the decline is serious study in technology:

http://thejournal.com/articles/2009/08/04/computer-science-courses-on-th...

We force students to learn foreign languages when everyone in the world is learning English but ignore the most important language for their future.. the languages of computers. Granted this is not a spoken language yet, but several written languages that allow human computer interaction.

When you go to a movie and see something like AVATAR, this new method of CGI animation was created by programmers who had computer science classes. This kind of higher level work cannot be done on a portable device but only on a computing device.

As a parent of a child in preschool with an IEP, I am please to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that all students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments.

I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments

I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments.

I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments. I like how in the Executive Summary (page 4) it states "It brings state-of-the art technology into learning to enable, motivate, and inspire all students, regardless of background, languages, or disabilities to achieve. It leverages the power of technology to provide personalized learning instead of one-size-fits-all curriculum, page of teaching, and instructional practices. " It also states "The challenge for our education system is to leverage the learning sciences and modern technology to create engaging, relevant, and personalized learning experiences for learners that mirror students' daily lives and the reality of their futures. In contrast to traditional classroom instruction, this requires that we put students at the center of their own learning by providing flexibility on several dimensions."

My husband and I are the proud parents of a bright charming 9 year old who, due to learning differences, processing difficulties, and difficulties with focus struggles in school. This plan gives me hope because instruction that is based on the way people learn and is personalized in order to increase motivation could help kids like our son survive and thrive in the educational system.

I want to strongly support the NETP's recommendations on Open Educational Resources (OERs). I think that wider use of OERs has the opportunity to address many of the NETP's goals:

  • Make textbooks more affordable
  • Make it easier to make the textbook content accessible
  • Make it easier to adapt textbooks to students with special needs (the UDL angle)
  • Make it easier to embed best teaching practices, to help teachers who need assistance with certain modules
  • Make it easier to embed richer content to increase understanding and acquisition of educationally important concepts
  • Make it easier to change portions of textbooks that are failing to meet the needs of students and/or teachers

We invest a great deal in educational materials. A robust OER offering will create a baseline to ensure that nobody gets left out of the educational opportunities we believe are the birthright of Americans. Economically depressed school systems will have access to the latest materials, even if they don't have the budget. Home-schoolers will a complete set of textbooks for whatever subjects they need. Parents will be able to independently access the learning content that meets the relevant standards, and be better able to assist their children.

OERs are not the enemy of the publishing business, just like the open source movement has been fully embraced by Silicon Valley as a new and better way of doing business. But, it's clear that OERs could be a source of Secretary Duncan's goal of revolutionary, not evolutionary change in education.

There's a great deal to like in the new National Education Technology Plan: I think it's captured well the challenges we have going forward in seeing that the use of technology in education fully supports our goals for the country and most of all, our students.

My first comment is about the two overarching goals. I feel strongly that closing the achievement gap will go a long way towards hitting the 60% goal of 2-year and 4-year post-secondary achievement for students. We can make a great deal of progress by innovating in our approaches towards those students who are most likely to fail to meet these objectives: students with economic disadvantages, students from minority communities, students who are children of immigrants, students with disabilities.

Implementing the kinds of reforms and innovations detailed in the plan will go a long way, if we actually pursue innovations that can reach scale. Anything we do only counts if it can reach tens if not hundreds of thousands of students. Anything less is just wasted energy and resources. And, we're pretty good at doing things that fail to go to scale.

Technology is built to affordably scale. Let's exploit that to the maximum extent. We can't afford to do anything less!

My special needs grandson should get a quality education and asswsment. I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments

I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments

I would like to see more funding and emphasis on the development of new educational technologies (The D in R&D). We need more software, curriculum, and technology options developed for (and by) teachers and students.

Medicine and engineering spend 5-10% on R&D. In education the percentage is closer to 0.01%, and most of that little bit is spent on pure research, not development. NSF doesn't even fund much K-12 software or curriculum development anymore. See this post:
http://edtechdev.wordpress.com/2007/05/18/the-state-of-educational-resea...

If we taught kids and preservice teachers a little bit about how to develop interactive software (such as animations and games and interactive websites), that would go a long way to helping address this problem as well, and would require much less funding. This is related to the "computational thinking" push seen in computer science. We should look at programming as the new 4th "R", a new literacy that students and teachers need in today's world. I wrote a chapter on this very idea as well:
http://itls.usu.edu/files/u3/Holton-educoders-chapter.pdf

Take for example this very website, developed in Drupal. Teachers and librarians and so forth could do well by learning how to use a content management system like Drupal to assist with their teaching, their communication with students and parents, etc. Instead preservice teachers are only barely taught the basics of HTML - something that hasn't changed in over 10 years. Here's a course I teach that goes beyond basic HTML early on to teach about Drupal, for example: http://internetdev.usu.edu/

When building our Plan, it is important that we dig deeply into the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) work and extend it to curriculum design and community support. Such a model needs to see in Personalized Learning, 3 sets of data that we must focus on, do R&D to evolve, and must integrate to optimize the value of this initiative.

Focusing on any one without taking into account the others seriously limits the potential. In a sense the essence of personalized learning is the sum of the synergies among these three--synergies that our current IT + learning sciences make possible:

1) LEARNER
Data about the learner that helps maximize the student's learning experience

2) CURRICULUM
Data about the curriculum or the learning experiences/situations that cause a high level of engagement that leads to maximizing student activity

3) COMMUNITY
Data about the learner's learning/support community that enables maximizing social engagement, communication processes, "stewardship" in a social context, productivity, and self-esteem

To do this work suggests a new approach to research that supports personalized learning through new levels and kinds of of partnerships.

It also suggests a new design approach to building online feedback systems. In particular such systems should be transparent to users and should engage users in both building and responding to the "expert systems." This is important so we empower students and educators to learn from and teach the system, to be reflective about the rubrics the system employs, rather than to be obedient to yet another system.

A productive discussion of "merit pay" needs to wait on our developing useful, predictive models of individual development/learning and upon our wisely pairing teachers and students in areas that fit their dispositions.

It remains unclear how we reconcile standards with models of individual development that have emerged and will emerge as we apply our sciences to better understanding and meeting individual needs. Individuals do not naturally grow in cognitive, affective, intuitive, social, and sensory areas according to external standards. We need to be much more responsive to inner motives/needs of students if we are too maximize engagement. How standards will or can support this effort is a key challenge to our success.

I am excited and encouraged to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational scaffold for ensuring alll children to have the right to high quality instruction and accurate assessments.

I recently finished a reportage about how educators use the virtual world of Second Life to engage students & share thoughts/concerns amongst each other.
Immersive environments like SL are a fantastic way to expose students to relevant content & connect across cultural boundaries.
Here is the video - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmSEF-ntdOw

I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments

I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments.

I am pleased to see that the draft National Educational Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that ALL students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments

It seems a bit ironic that the Department chooses to embed Youtube videos when such videos are blocked by a large majority of US schools.

There are a number of tools available like TeacherTube or SchoolTube that educators and administrators are able to access more freely.

My number one wish of the Department as an educator is that it becomes more in touch with the classroom. Not understanding the Youtube issue is one example of this current disconnect.

First, is there any chance of changing the competitive paradigm so blatant in Obama's quote: “By 2020, America will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world”?

What about a goal of having all American citizens contributing to a sustainable future rather than an UNsustainable future? What about getting away from this insularity and promoting the reality that we are all connected on one planet?

Second, in pushing 21st century learning, please keep in mind that learners need a lot more connecting with the rest of Nature -- probably more than they need more connecting with technology.

Please see Classrooms that Integrate and Connect: http://www.greenhearted.org/classrooms-that-integrate-and-connect.html

Julie Johnston
GreenHeart Education

I agree! We need new measures of success when it comes to what it means to be leaders in our global economy, global security and in the scientific endeavor. It could be that we will be highly integrated into world markets, sharing ideas, improving ideas...it could be that we generate new jobs, professions and endeavors connected to a more sustainable life style...

I am happy to see many of the details outlined in this draft. I have been pushing in my district to prepare our infrastructure for faculty/student owned devices without finding success. As an IT professional I am ready to build that infrastructure.

I also think that the adoption of FOSS operating systems and productivity applications will enable these goals to be met more easily; both from the standpoint of cost and the nature of what students can do as part of FOSS projects.

There is a presentation being given at EdTechDay 2010 in Ithaca NY that will go over some of these points. http://www.ithaca.edu/edtechday/seminars/

Hello there!

In many places, the report discusses critical thinking, complex problem solving, collaboration, and multimedia communication (aka 21st century competencies). The report also talks about adaptive learning skills, procedural knowledge, factual knowledge, motivational engagement. We read about goals of creating inquisitive, creative, resourceful thinkers, informed citizens, effective problem-solving, groundbreaking pioneers, and visionary leaders.

But the report also clearly articulates the importance of data-based instruction and data-based decisions.

How does this report imagine education in the context of quantitative data and qualitative experience?

The report says data, data, data. I get it. But the report also says schools can’t be “information factories”. Where do those ends meet?

The National UDL (Universal Design for Learning) Task Force, a coalition of 38 national organizations representing general education, special education and higher education interests, works to promote UDL in Federal policy and legislation. We are pleased to see that the National Education Technology Plan recognizes UDL as an important educational framework for ensuring that all students receive high quality instruction and accurate assessments.

Hearing loss is an invisible disability and many students who have a hearing loss were not brought up in Deaf Culture and therefore are not fluent in American Sign Language. In fact most students born deaf or hard of hearing have hearing parents. They wear hearing aids or cochlear implants and speak and listen. Many are not aware of the assistive listening devices that need to be available like induction loops and CART (Communication Assistive Real-Time Translation) word-for-word transcription of what their hearing peers are able to hear in class. Many hearing professionals in the disability offices feel that a sign language interpreter is enough even for the student who is not fluent in sign language. Some offer C-Print or TellType but that is not word-for-word transcription. Instead it is "meaning-for-meaning" and what the C-Print typist describes. FM Systems also are a form of assisted listening device but some professors do not want to wear them. Our armed forces are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with a severe hearing loss and these accommodations must be made manditory for these servicemen and women returning to universities of higher learning or attending a play or movie. People with visible disabilities also have a hearing loss.
Thanks for listening.

Secretary Duncan,

The Draft NETP 2010 is right on. Go Team Obama! You have my continued and full support.

Would you welcome Proofs of Concept for next steps, not to solve all of the current issues; but, to make some level of measured improvement through change that supports the NETP 2010? If so, where should they be directed?

I have been a participant in several online conferences in the last couple of years. These conferences bring together educators from all over the country. They have been wonderful for learning and getting ideas from other teachers. I think the idea regarding 'connected teaching' is excellent. It works and I could easily see possibilities for connecting not only educators, but classrooms in K-12 schools with classes in institutions of higher education.
Also, I do think rural schools do need support for building and improving their infrastructure to bring technology to the students. The plan is long and I hope to have time to read it all very soon. Thank you for posting the plan online.

Our district has implemented several pieces of technology that have really amped up our teaching.
1.Tablet laptops for each teacher in the district.
2.LCD projectors in every classroom.
3.ELMO document cameras in every building
4.Wireless tablet laptop lab and a desktop computer lab in each school.
5.Circulating SMART Boards in each school. (1:3 teacher to SMART Board ratio)
6.Personal response systems.
7.Dedicated computer education time (grades 1-12 two times per week for 30 minutes)
8.WiiMote/inferred pen software to interface with tablet laptops and SMART Board software.
9.IPOD touches for Special Education Teachers.
10.MP3 players for classroom teachers (used in place of books on tape)

When technological tools are being used students are completely engaged. Technology is where today’s students are comfortable. They excel when teachers are able to supplement their teaching with some form of technology. The financial commitment that our district has made for technology will translate to positive results for our students.

In this video, "Youth, Technology, and Learning: Opportunities for Educators and Future Employers," http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGhhETB9RNg high schoolers discuss how they use technology for communication, problems they have with traditional education, and how they learn best.

Many interesting aspects to the plan and yet so many that seem to conflict.

1. Creating students who can learn independently should help us shorten the educational cycle. Imagine a 16 year old who enters the banking industry and would be extremely productive by 20. Why keep them until they are 22 and then have industry spend 2 more years in training?

2. Computerized assessments only go so far. What seems to happen with more of this type of data is that 'mass' changes are made which then don't seem to be good for the individual child. Let's get less 'mass ideas' (we don't need one plan for all 300 million people in the U.S.) and more letting things happen on the individual teacher level. Then student assessment can really happen and teachers can be held accountable.

3. Learning theories and curriculum ideas have shifted back and forth from 'give them the info and they will put it all together later' to 'teach them to think and they will find the information when they need it.' It just seems that this plan is swinging back to the latter end of the scale (again).

More collaboration - definitely. More online access - no brainer. More productivity - absolutely. If you take a look at all the current business trends, almost all focus on how the leader serves the worker right on down the line knowing that it is the lowest one in the line that ultimately makes the most difference. So instead of the government making us all do the same thing maybe they should figure out how to let all teachers do the things that are best for the students they are teaching. That is what works.

I just spent 1/2 hour wading through the plan. My gosh!! Does it really take all that to implement technology in the schools? Do you have to defend the use of technology and say the healthcare and other sectors are using it?

As an educational computer consultant, I would say that the DOE is once again missing the boat. Wherever you see the words "design and develop," I see billions wasted. It's already designed and developed, people! Have you heard of Web 2.0?

If not, take a look at Twitter, Ning, Wordpress, craigslist, Facebook.And how about Microsoft Project for not having to reinvent the wheel? The infrastructure is there. And, there are ways to tap in to it and make it work for education very cheaply and safely (safety would be the largest area of concern, but it, too is not quite rocket science). I know that technology is revolutionary and education is evolutionary, but chees, people, show some basic understanding of reality here!

- Ellen Faden
Career changing from high tech into education

I agree with Ms. Faden. The technology is there, but the safety is a major concern whereby most of the tools mentioned are block on school Internet sites, because the students abuse the privilege no matter how much you teach them about responsibility or accountability. It is then the teacher who gets blamed, not the student, for accessing inappropriate content. A teacher tries to have eyes in the back of their head, but the students watch out for each other to perform a 2 second minimize or back click. So you can spend all the taxpayer dollars you want, but unless it is to set up on a sub-node of the Internet named .edu so students can have unrestricted access for only appropriate content and whereby the student maintains legal accountability for the exercise of their own freedom of speech, then the liability factor for teachers and school districts remains too high. Any inappropriate websites appearing on the .edu should result in severe federal punishment.

Technology which improves student achievement: Promethean Board ActivInspire software used in conjunction with Activexpressions and Activotes for formative assessment. Teachers create interactive lessons using the Promethean board, ask questions as they teach and students answer using response sytems. Teachers can tell immediately who understands and who needs assistance. Also, using videos to publish students work, whether it is writing, art, acting, expressing thoughts about a projects, etc... motivates students to do their best work and raises achievement. Digital storytelling using photos and videos is much more motivating than writing stories in a journal. Creating posters using Glogster allows for so much more creativity than drawing on a poster board and using interactive websites for simulations and skill practice where students have immediate feedback promotes student learning. Publishing students work for an audience using Web 2.0 tools like wikis and blogs allows students to collaborate, edit each others work and raise their level of achievement.