Fayetteville State Awarded $718K Naval Research Grant

High school students in Fayetteville, NC and undergraduates at Fayetteville State University will soon have access to training and career preparation in military research and development, thanks to a $718,338 grant from the Office of Naval Research.

Through two outreach programs designed to engage HBCU students and to increase minority participation in the sciences, FSU’s Center for Defense and Homeland Security will oversee STEM instructional delivery to local high school students and enhanced research opportunities for undergraduates.

FSU officials expect for 20 undergraduate students to complete research at Naval Research Laboratories over the life of the three-year grant.

Get More Details Here: Fayetteville State Awarded $718K Naval Research Grant

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Tennessee State Selected for National Environmental Health Program

Tennessee State University was recently announced as part of a national consortium of colleges and universities partnering with the Environmental Protection Agency to promote awareness of air toxicity.

The 2014 Toxic Release Inventory University Challenge promotes student innovation in raising awareness around environmental hazards in communities nationwide. TSU was selected from a pool of 11 institutional applicants, and will conduct research and awareness campaigns through its Geographic Information Sciences Laboratory.

The winning proposal was submitted by associate Geography professor Dr. David A. Padgett. Tennessee State is the only historically Black college in this year’s consortium.

Get More Details here: Tennessee State Selected for National Environmental Health Program

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FAMU Professor and Engineering Student Named Fulbright Scholars

FAMU Professor and Engineering Student Named Fulbright Scholars

Researchers will study Nigerian plants to find engineering, medical solutions

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida A&M University (FAMU) mechanical engineering doctoral candidate Renee Gordon and biochemistry professor Ngozi Ugochukwu, Ph.D., have been named Fulbright Scholars. The prestigious Fulbright Scholars Program is a highly competitive international education exchange program that awards grants to students, faculty or professionals who wish to study, teach and conduct research abroad. Both Gordon and Ugochukwu will conduct respective research on the indigenous resources of Nigeria.

ReneeGordon

Renee Gordon, Engineering Student Takes Green Ambitions to Nigeria
Gordon is the first student in the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering to receive the Fulbright grant. Her research will focus on using biomass, specifically Nigeria’s cassava leaves, as a green alternative to case hardening steel. She will reside at Nigeria’s Federal University of Technology (FUT) in Akure, which partners with FAMU in a mutual teaching and research exchange program.

According to Gordon, receiving the Fulbright grant brings her closer to fulfilling her desire to do something “forward thinking and innovative” with the indigenous resources of Nigeria. Her goal upon completing her Ph.D. is to work in green engineering with a focus on sustainable and alternative energy and to eventually return to FAMU as a professor to share her knowledge and experiences with others.

“It’s about using sustainable materials and resources that don’t take away from our fossil fuels and using materials that can be regenerated and regrown,” said Gordon about the focus of her research, which picks up where her mentor and research supervisor Peter Kalu, Ph.D. left off.

Kalu, a 3M Distinguished Research Professor in Mechanical Engineering at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering and 2009-2010 Fulbright Scholar, also conducted research on how Nigeria’s cassava leaves could be used as an alternative method for hardening metal. His research was essential to the establishment of FAMU’s exchange program with FUT.

“We’re making headway there and she’s going to really take the research further,” said Kalu, expressing confidence in his protégé’s potential.

Gordon is a first generation American citizen by way of Jamaica, and first generation college graduate. She said receiving the Fulbright grant is a milestone in the progress of her research after having to overcome several obstacles in order to continue her work.

When Gordon and Kalu were invited to present their research at the Fifth International Conference on Structural Engineering, Mechanics and Computation in Cape Town, South Africa in 2013, the duo had planned to have research samples delivered to Nigeria to complete an important heat treatment process phase of the cassava project, however a lack of resources and funding limited them in getting the samples to their destination, until then-Interim President Larry Robinson, Ph.D., stepped in to help.

After receiving the funding they needed, Gordon and Kalu were able to journey to Nigeria for six days prior to their presentation in South Africa, complete the heat treatment and return stateside to continue the research.

“My mom has always instilled in me that I should go as far as I can with my education,” said

Gordon. “I’ve had a lot of hurdles and stumbling blocks, so it’s great for it to come full circle.”

NgoziUgochukwu

Ngozi Ugochukwu, Ph.D., Professor Journeys to Nigeria to Combat Diabetes
Ugochukwu will also complete her research in Nigeria at FUT in Minna. Her research will focus on ethnopharmacology, the study of ethnic groups and their use of drugs. She will also conduct research on bioactive compounds and their role as leads for drug discovery, and uses for traditional medicine in diabetes therapy.

Ugochukwu has been researching diabetes since her tenure began at FAMU in 1998. Her expertise includes the use of biochemical and gene technology techniques in deciphering the underlying mechanisms in the pathophysiology of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, congestive heart failure and colon cancer. Her research focus also includes finding effective preventive strategies and therapies for these diseases.

“Diabetes is considered by the World Health Organization and International Diabetes Foundation as one of the major threats to human health in the 21st century,” said Ugochukwu. “The Fulbright grant will give me the opportunity to collaborate with researchers at the FUT Minna Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology and the Global Institute for Bio-exploration to scientifically screen and identify anti-diabetic bioactive phytonutrients in indigenous Nigerian plants.”

According to Ugochukwu, this collaborative research could accelerate the discovery and development of new phytopharmaceuticals for diabetes therapy.

Her passion for diabetes research began while she was working on her Ph.D. in Nigeria. Her mission then was to find a fundamental human chronic disease that didn’t have a cure. Her research ultimately led her to diabetes.

“I have this inner quest to find some form of therapy for diabetes,” Ugochukwu said. “Especially because I have done research on the underlying root causes, which are oxidative stress and inflammation. So, discovering anything that will quell those things will be key.”

“I work with chronic diseases like hypertension, heart disease, congestive heart failure, colon cancer and the like, and underneath them all you see diabetes surfacing its ugly head,” she added.

In addition to her research, Ugochukwu will teach classes in biochemical pharmacology, clinical biochemistry and biochemistry laboratory including virtual proteomics exercises.

She attributes much of her success in research to the support of the FAMU research community, especially her students.

“I am elated about my selection as a Fulbright grantee,” Ugochukwu said. “It’s quite an honor to be recognized by this prestigious body. However, I must attribute this to the collaborative research work my graduate students and I have conducted on chronic diseases over the years at FAMU.”

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UDC Celebrates National Pollinator Week

UDC Celebrates National Pollinator Weekwith Garden Planting at Local Charter School

June 16-22, 2014 is “National Pollinator Week.” Designated by the U.S. Senate in 2007, “National Pollinator Week” raises bee health awareness by addressing the decline of pollinator populations, which include bees, butterflies, bats and beetles. These pollinating animals support terrestrial wildlife, providing healthy watershed and more.

Honey bees play an important part in our agricultural ecosystem. According to the USDA, one-third of our daily diet comes from honey bee pollinated crops. Pollen is transported by honey bees, allowing plants to produce fruits, vegetables and seeds. Despite their critical role, these pollinators are being increasingly threatened by extreme weather, parasites and disease, and reductions in forage areas. Surveys of honey bee colonies as measured since 2006 have shown average winter losses of nearly 30 percent. Of particular concern is the impact of the invasive parasite, the Varroa mite, which the USDA considers “the single most detrimental pest of honey bees” and the one factor most closely associated with colony decline.

Encouragingly, urban beekeeping is gaining in popularity, especially in Washington, D.C., with even the White House cultivating its own colonies. Honey bees thrive in pollinator patches, which offer bees blooming opportunities and a variety of flowers to support different bee species, increasing pollinator diversity. In partnership with The SEED School, the University of the District of Columbia Master Gardener Program will celebrate planting a pollinator garden as part of the Bayer Bee Care Program.

“Pollinator forage is essential to the health of honey bees,” explained Sandra Farber, coordinator of the University of the District of Columbia Master Gardener Program. “We are delighted to partner with Bayer CropScience and come together with students and industry stakeholders to design and plant a garden to support pollinator health.”

Master Gardeners, revitalized in 2002, is a volunteer program affiliated with land-grant universities through the Cooperative Extension Service. D.C.’s Cooperative Extension programs are housed under the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences of the University of the District of Columbia. Washington, D.C. and Baltimore City are the only metropolitan, inner city Master Gardener Programs on the east coast of the U.S. The volunteers utilize research-based information to educate the public on best practices in horticulture and environmental stewardship. Active in all 50 states and Canada, it was established to assist Cooperative Extension in reaching the consumer horticulture audience.

The program provides interested individuals with extensive training in topics such as plant pathology, entomology, urban soils, plant propagation, and pruning clinics. In return, participants dedicate volunteer time to teach horticultural information, answer questions, speak at public events and participate in community gardening programs. Nationally, Master Gardeners volunteered more than five million hours in 2012. In 2013, 226 active Master Gardeners gave a total of 9,000 hours valued at $348,210. Currently, there are a total of 226 active Master Gardeners in the District of Columbia.

Beekeeping was legalized in D.C. under the Urban Agriculture Apiculture Act of 2012 and is regulated by the District Department of the Environment. UDC offers beekeeping courses in partnership in with The DC Beekeepers Alliance and the Northern Virginia Beekeeping Education Consortium.

The Bayer CropScience Pollinator Garden Planting will be held Thursday, June 19, at The SEED School, at 10:30 a.m. The SEED Public Charter School of Washington, D.C., is located at 4300 C Street, SE.

The SEED School, D.C.
Copyright: The Seed School of D.C.

To learn more about other local Pollinator Week events, visit pollinator.org. For more information on CAUSES, visit www.udc.edu/causes.

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About The SEED School

The SEED School of Washington, D.C.  is a public, college-preparatory boarding school whose primary mission is to provide an outstanding, intensive educational program that prepares children, both academically and socially, for success in college. More than 320 students in grades six through twelve attend SEED. All students live on campus Sunday through Friday, enabling them to benefit from an integrated curriculum that incorporates academic, extracurricular, and life skills learning.

About Bayer CropScience

Bayer is a global enterprise with core competencies in the fields of health care, agriculture and high-tech materials. Bayer CropScience, the subgroup of Bayer AG responsible for the agricultural business, has annual sales of EUR 8,819 million (2013) and is one of the world’s leading innovative crop science companies in the areas of seeds, crop protection and non-agricultural pest control. The company offers an outstanding range of products including high value seeds, innovative crop protection solutions based on chemical and biological modes of action as well as an extensive service backup for modern, sustainable agriculture. In the area of non-agricultural applications, Bayer CropScience has a broad portfolio of products and services to control pests from home and garden to forestry applications. The company has a global workforce of 22,400 and is represented in more than 120 countries. This and further news is available at: www.press.bayercropscience.com.

About the University of the District of Columbia

An HBCU, urban land-grant, and the only public university in the nation’s capital, The University of the District of Columbia is committed to a broad mission of education, research and community service.  Established by abolitionist Myrtilla Miner in 1851, the University of DC offers Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees and a host of workplace development services designed to create opportunities for student success.  The University is comprised of the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental SciencesCollege of Arts and Sciences,  School of Business and Public AdministrationSchool of Engineering and Applied Sciences, a Community College and the David A. Clarke School of Law. To learn more visit www.udc.edu. Tee University of the District of Columbia is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. Minorities, women, veterans and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. For a full version of the University’s EO Policy Statement, please visit: http://www.udc.edu/equal_opportunity.The University of the District of Columbia is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education – 3624 Market Street – Philadelphia, PA 19104 – 267.284.5000.

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NSF’s ADVANCE Program Webinar – July 8, 2014

NSF’s ADVANCE Program Webinar – July 8, 2014

NSF’s ADVANCE: Increasing the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers (ADVANCE) program will be conducting a Webinar focused on its new solicitation.  The solicitation is available online at http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?WT.z_pims_id=5383&ods_key=nsf14573.  The goals of the ADVANCE program are (1) to develop systemic approaches to increase the representation and advancement of women in academic STEM careers; (2) to develop innovative and sustainable ways to promote gender equity in the STEM academic workforce; and (3) to contribute to the development of a more diverse science and engineering workforce.

For All Project Types: Community colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, minority-serving institutions (e.g. Tribal Colleges and Universities, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions, Alaska Native Institutions, Predominantly Black Institutions and Non-tribal, Native American Serving Institutions), women’s colleges, and institutions primarily serving persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Additional information below.

NSF ADVANCE Program New Solicitation Webinars

Jul 8 2014 2:00PM to Jul 8 2014 3:30PM Webinar

The ADVANCE Program Office is offering two identical webinars about the new solicitation.  More at http://www.nsf.gov/events/event_summ.jsp?cntn_id=131676&WT.mc_id=USNSF_13&WT.mc_ev=click

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U.S. Department of the Interior’s Grants Notices (Opened to Colleges and Universities)

U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service

Funding Opportunity Number: P14AS00125

Funding Opportunity Title: Long Term Monitoring of Southern Colorado Plateau Network

Opportunity Category: Discretionary

Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement

Category of Funding Activity:  Education Employment, Labor and Training Environment Natural Resources Regional Development Science and Technology and other Research and Development

Posted Date: June 9, 2014

Original Closing Date for Applications: Jun 23, 2014

Estimated Total Program Funding: $195,000

Description:

NOTICE OF INTENT TO AWARD This Funding Announcement is not a request for applications. This announcement is to provide public notice of the National Park Service¿s intention to fund the following project activities without full and open competition. ABSTRACT Funding Announcement P14AS00125 Project Title Long Term Monitoring of Southern Colorado Plateau Network Recipient Northern Arizona University CP-CESU Principle Investigator / Program Manager Dr. James Allen Total Anticipated Award Amount $195,000.00 Cost Share none New Award or Continuation? Continuation of Cooperative Agreement H2370094001 Anticipated Length of Agreement From Date of award until 12/31/2016 Anticipated Period of Performance From Date of award until 12/31/2016 Award Instrument Cooperative Agreement Statutory Authority 16 USC 1(g) CFDA # and Title Single Source Justification Criteria Cited (2) Continuation NPS Point of Contact June Zastrow 303-987-6718 june_zastrow@nps.gov OVERVIEW Cooperative Agreement Number H2370094001 was entered into by and between the Department of the Interior, National Park Service (NPS), and Northern Arizona University (NAU) for the purpose of providing field ecology and technical support for long-term monitoring in Southern Colorado Plateau Network (SCPN) parks. The purpose of the monitoring program is to improve our scientific understanding of the status and trends in the condition of a targeted subset of park resources, thus contributing to describing regional resource conditions. Unless otherwise specified herein, the terms and conditions as stated in the Cooperative Agreement will apply to this Task Agreement. Field Ecology and Technical Support for Long-Term Monitoring in National Parks of the SCPN As part of the SCPN Vital Signs monitoring program, this project contributes to understanding the current status and tracking trends in condition through time for a selected suite of indicators of ecosystem condition. The purpose of the project described herein is for SCPN and NAU to collaborate to conduct long-term monitoring of upland, riparian/aquatic and landscape-level indicators in targeted park ecosystems and to communicate monitoring results to a broad audience of park managers, partners and the general public. Through this collaboration, NPS and NAU will contribute to describing regional ecological integrity and furthering scientific understanding of the current conditions of park resources, which often serve as reference conditions when evaluating the condition of public lands that are more impacted by human use. Results from this project will be publicly available through the SCPN website (http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/scpn/index.cfm) and the Learning Center of the American Southwest website (http://www.southwestlearning.org/). RECIPIENT INVOLVEMENT 1. To implement long-term water resources monitoring of selected SCPN streams and springs and to collaborate with the SCPN staff toward the completion of water resources monitoring protocols and reports. Monitoring topics include 1) riparian ecosystems, 2) aquatic macroinvertebrates, 3) water quality, and 4) spring ecosystems. 2. To implement long-term upland vegetation and soils monitoring within selected upland ecological sites and to collaborate with the SCPN staff toward the completion of upland monitoring reports. 3. To implement the SCPN Data Management Plan and to to collaborate with the SCPN staff toward developing and maintaining the program¿s data management and GIS capabilities. 4. To collaborate with SCPN staff to provide technical writing, editing, and report preparation. The writer/editor will work in collaboration with SCPN staff to produce Natural Resource Technical Report Series publications and other web-based or printed materials for the program, thus promoting the communication of I&M results to NPS managers, partners and the broader public. NAU will also provide printing services support to prepare final reports for distribution to SCPN parks, cooperators and the public. 5. To collaborate with SCPN staff to develop science communication materials about the natural resources of SCPN parks and related NPS management and science issues/activities. These projects will contribute to public understanding of park resources and resource topics and may be written for the SCPN and/or LCAS websites. A NAU School of Communication Intern will be involved in some of these projects. 6. To provide support for the Learning Center of the American Southwest (LCAS) website in coordination with SCPN and the Chihuahuan, Sonoran, and Southern Plains Networks. 7. Through Deaver Herbarium, to resolve NPS herbarium collection record issues in order to improve tracking of NPS collections. This will also contribute to a more accurate regional understanding of the distribution of plant species across the Colorado Plateau. 8. To provide project oversight and administration. The NAU Principal Investigator will supervise the NAU staff involved with tasks above and will serve as a senior scientist providing scientific review and guidance, as well as coordination with SCPN staff. NATIONAL PARK SERVICE INVOLVEMENT Substantial involvement on the part the National Park Service is anticipated for the successful completion of the objectives to be funded by this award. In particular, the National Park Service will be responsible for the following: SCPN staff will work collaboratively with NAU to complete monitoring protocols. NPS Staff will select systems & sites for monitoring & will provide training/oversight for monitoring work. SCPN GIS specialist will provide sampling design & GPS Support. SCPN data managers will develop database formats & metadata standards for documenting results of NAU monitoring. SCPN staff will work with NAU to communicate research results to NPS resource managers & the public. Substantial involvement is also necessary to ensure NPS I&IM data standards are met & to provide substantive review of data products and the reports. SINGLE-SOURCE JUSTIFICATION DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SINGLE SOURCE POLICY REQUIREMENTS Department of the Interior Policy (505 DM 2) requires a written justification which explains why competition is not practicable for each single-source award. The justification must address one or more of the following criteria as well as discussion of the program legislative history, unique capabilities of the proposed recipient, and cost-sharing contribution offered by the proposed recipient, as applicable. In order for an assistance award to be made without competition, the award must satisfy one or more of the following criteria: (1) Unsolicited Proposal ¿ The proposed award is the result of an unsolicited assistance application which represents a unique or innovative idea, method, or approach which is not the subject of a current or planned contract or assistance award, but which is deemed advantageous to the program objectives; (2) Continuation ¿ The activity to be funded is necessary to the satisfactory completion of, or is a continuation of an activity presently being funded, and for which competition would have a significant adverse effect on the continuity or completion of the activity; (3) Legislative intent ¿ The language in the applicable authorizing legislation or legislative history clearly indicates Congress¿ intent to restrict the award to a particular recipient of purpose; (4) Unique Qualifications ¿ The applicant is uniquely qualified to perform the activity based upon a variety of demonstrable factors such as location, property ownership, voluntary support capacity, cost-sharing ability if applicable, technical expertise, or other such unique qualifications; (5) Emergencies ¿ Program/award where there is insufficient time available (due to a compelling and unusual urgency, or substantial danger to health or safety) for adequate competitive procedures to be followed. The National Park Service did not solicit full and open competition for this award based the following criteria: (2) CONTINUATION SINGLE SOURCE JUSTIFICATION DESCRIPTION: THIS IS A NOTICE OF INTENT TO AWARD This is a Task Agreement (P14AC00859) under Cooperative Agreement (H2370094001) in the amount of $195,000.00 with a period of performance from date of award until 12/31/2014. “This proposed project between Northern Arizona University and the National Park Service is authorized to go through the Colorado Plateau CESU at the negotiated overhead rate of 17.5% because it passes the test of substantial involvement by the NPS, public purpose and consistency with the mission of the CESU Network” Also, on the SF 424 forms that the partner sponsored programs office fills out for each project, requires a CFDA number – 15.945, which is the number associated with the CFDA Title: COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND TRAINING PROGRAMS – RESOURCES OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (CESU). STATUTORY AUTHORITY A. 16 U.S.C. §1g authorizes the NPS to enter into cooperative agreements that involve the transfer of NPS appropriated funds to state, local and tribal governments, other public entities, educational institutions, and private nonprofit organizations for the public purpose of carrying out National Park Service programs. B. 16 U.S.C. §1a-2(j) Cooperative research and training programs. Authorizes the NPS to enter into cooperative agreements with public or private educational institutions, states, and their political subdivisions, for the purpose of developing adequate, coordinated, cooperative research and training programs concerning the resources of the national park system. Pursuant to such agreements, the cooperator may accept from or make available to the NPS technical and support staff, financial assistance for mutually agreed upon research projects, supplies and equipment, facilities, and administrative services relating to cooperative research units as the Secretary deems appropriate (research projects subject to Federal Acquisition Regulation excluded). Modified 5/31/05 ¿ Agreement Handbook Memorandum Number 2 C. 16 U.S.C. §5933 Cooperative agreements. The Secretary is authorized and directed to enter into cooperative agreements with colleges and universities, including but not limited to land grant schools, in partnership with other Federal and State agencies, to establish cooperative study units to conduct multi-disciplinary research and develop integrated information products on the resources of the National Park System, or the larger region of which parks are a part.

Link to additional information:   http://www.grants.gov

If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:  June Zastrow, 303-987-6718 June_Zastrow@nps.gov

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FACT SHEET & REPORT: Opportunity for All: My Brother’s Keeper Blueprint for Action

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

FACT SHEET & REPORT: Opportunity for All: My Brother’s Keeper Blueprint for Action

The My Brother’s Keeper Task Force Report to the President can be found HERE.

Over the past five years, the hard work and grit of the American people pulled our economy back from the brink of collapse. We are now moving forward again. But there is more work to do, and for decades opportunity has lagged behind for some, including millions of boys and young men of color. Boys of color are too often born into poverty and live with a single parent. And while their gains contributed to the national high school graduation rate reaching an all-time high, in some school districts dropout rates remain high. Too many of these boys and young men will have negative interactions with the juvenile and criminal justice system, and the dream of a college education is within grasp for too few. Our society can and will do more to help remove barriers to all young people’s success, because America prospers not only when hard work and responsibility are rewarded but also when we all pull forward together.

Rebuilding that core American value—community—is why the President launched My Brother’s Keeper, an initiative designed to determine what works to help young people stay on track to reach their full potential.

The Administration is doing its part by identifying programs and policies that work, and recommending action that will help all our young people succeed. Since the launch of My Brother’s Keeper, the President’s Task Force has met with and heard from thousands of Americans, through online and in-person listening sessions, who are already taking action. Cities and towns, businesses, foundations, faith leaders and individuals have made commitments to helping youth get a strong start in school and life and later connect them to mentoring, support networks and specialized skills they need to find a good job or go to college and work their way up into the middle class. As President Obama has said, “We are stronger when America fields a full team.”

Today, the President met with his Cabinet to discuss the Task Force’s initial assessments and recommendations and the President called on the American people to get engaged through mentorship opportunities nationwide.

Call to Action

The President is calling on Americans interested in getting involved in My Brother’s Keeper to sign up as long-term mentors to young people at WH.gov/mybrotherskeeper. This effort will engage Americans from all walks of life to sign up to develop sustained and direct mentoring relationships that will play vital roles in the lives of young people.

It is important that all children have caring adults who are engaged in their lives. But too many young people lack this support. For example, roughly two-thirds of Black and one-third of Hispanic children live with only one parent. Moreover, research suggests that a father’s absence increases the risk of his child dropping out of school among Blacks and Hispanics by 75 percent and 96 percent respectively. We see significant high school dropout rates—as high as 50 percent in some school districts—including among boys and young men from certain Southeast Asian and Pacific Islander populations. And some 27 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives live in poverty, compared to 11.6% of White Americans.

Presidential Task Force 90-Day Report

As part of its 90-day report, the Task Force has identified a set of initial recommendations to the President, and a blueprint for action by government, business, non-profit, philanthropic, faith and community partners.

In developing its recommendations, the Task Force identified key milestones in the path to adulthood that are especially predictive of later success, and where interventions can have the greatest impact:

  1. Getting a healthy start and entering school ready to learn;
  2. Reading by third grade;
  3. Graduating from high school ready for college and career;
  4. Completing post-secondary education or training;
  5. Entering the workforce;
  6. Keeping kids on track and giving them second chances.

By focusing on these key moments, and helping our young people avoid roadblocks that hinder progress across life stages, we can help ensure that all children and young people have the tools they need to build successful lives. Focused on areas of action that can improve outcomes at these key moments, the President’s Task Force today presented him with recommendations including:

Cross-Cutting Recommendations

  • Launch a public-private campaign to actively recruit mentors for youth and improve the quality of mentoring programs.
  • Make the status and progress of boys and young men of color and other populations more visible by improving data collection and transparency.

A Healthy Start and Ready for School

  • Eliminate suspensions and expulsions in preschool and other early learning settings.

Reading at Grade Level by the End of Third Grade

  • Close the word gap by launching a public and private initiative to increase joint and independent reading time outside of school and build a reading culture in more homes.

Graduating from High School

  • Increase focus on transforming the schools and districts producing the majority of the country’s dropouts.

Completing Post-Secondary Education or Training

  • Increase college completion by expanding students’ access to and successful completion of rigorous courses, such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate and dual enrollment options in high school.

Entering the Workforce

  • Increase awareness about youth summer employment and use of pre-apprenticeships as good entry-level jobs.

Reducing Violence and Providing a Second Chance

  • Institutionalize community oriented policing practices in the field and employ methods to address racial and ethnic bias within the juvenile and criminal justice systems.

The recommendations identified by the President’s Task Force mark the starting point of what must and will be a long-term effort. The Task Force and public, private and philanthropic actors will continue to develop recommendations and support community solutions well beyond this 90-day progress report.

In addition to today’s announcements, in coming weeks and months, leading foundations will independently announce specific commitments to help ensure young people can succeed. The following foundations will together seek to invest at least $200 million: The Annie E. Casey Foundation, The Atlantic Philanthropies, Bloomberg Philanthropies, The California Endowment, The Ford Foundation, The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, The Open Society Foundations, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, The Kapor Center for Social Impact, and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

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OPEN REGISTRATION :: 2014 HBCU Week Conference

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPENHBCUs: Innovators for Future Success

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities

2014 National HBCU Week Conference

HBCUs: INNOVATORS FOR FUTURE SUCCESS

September 22-23, 2014

Washington Marriott Wardman Park

2660 Woodley Road NW, Washington, DC 20008

 

QUICK LINKS

Conference Summary

2014 HBCU Week Conference Overview

Hotel Information

Exhibitor Application Information

Frequently Asked Questions

General Registration

Free Admission | Online Registration is Required

Questions?? Contact Us

Join our listserv for automatic updates.

Press inquiries?  Contact press@ed.gov for information.

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RFP – CREST & HBCU-RISE Letters of Intent and Proposals

The National Science Foundation has issued the new Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) and HBCU Research Infrastructure for Science and Engineering (RISE) solicitation.  A link to the document including deadlines for letters of intent and proposals and contact officials is below. 

Eligibility for the 4 categories of proposals solicited in the CREST and HBCU-RISE are:

  • Preliminary and invited full CREST Center proposals may be submitted by minority-serving institutions of higher education in the United States. This denotes institutions that have undergraduate enrollments of 50% or more (based on total student enrollment) of members of minority groups underrepresented among those holding advanced degrees in science and engineering fields: African Americans, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Hispanic Americans, Native Hawaiian, and Native Pacific Islanders. Eligibility as a minority-serving institution will be determined by reference to the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) of the US Department of Education National Center for Education Statistics (http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/). Proposals are also invited from institutions of higher education that primarily serve populations of students with disabilities (http://www.nsf.gov/od/broadeningparticipation/nsf_frameworkforaction_0808.pdf). Support may be provided to partner institutions through subawards.
  • HBCU-RISE proposals are invited from Historically Black Colleges and Universities that offer doctoral degrees in science (including social, behavioral, and economic science), technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.
  • SBIR /STTR diversity collaborative supplement proposals are invited from current SBIR/STTR Phase II grantees and their CREST Center or HBCU-RISE institution partners.
  • BPR in STEM Education proposals are invited from institutions meeting the organizational eligibility for CREST Center or HBCU-RISE proposals.
    Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) and HBCU Research Infrastructure for Science and Engineering (RISE)

Available Formats:
HTML: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2014/nsf14565/nsf14565.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

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Accepting Applications for High School Summer Bridge Program in Environment & Sustainability

Now Accepting Applications for the 2014 Summer Bridge Program in Environmental and Sustainability Sciences

The College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSES) of the University of the District of Columbia has announced it is accepting applications for the 2014 Summer Bridge Program in Environmental and Sustainability Sciences. The course is designed to provide high school and incoming college students with the essential skills necessary to succeed in college studies and beyond. 

This year’s program will again focus on the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) disciplines of environmental computing, cloud computing, sustainability, water quality, climate change, engineering design and mobile technologies. An experiential learning opportunity, students will participate in lab analysis, field studies, educational field trips and a capstone project in the hands-on, interactive program led by Dr. Tolessa Deksissa, director of the Water Resources Research Institute, a division of CAUSES. Other instructors include Drs. Lily Liang, Suzan Harkness and Pradeep Behera.

“It is important we offer the students of D.C. the opportunity to gain STEM skills and knowledge, in order to remain competitive in today’s world. I am looking forward to another successful Summer Bridge course,” stated Dr. Deksissa.

Summer Bridge will be offered Mondays through Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., June 30 – July 25, 2014, on UDC’s Van Ness campus. Click here to apply. Applications are due by June 20.

The Summer Bridge Program in Science and Technology is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Last year, nearly 30 D.C. high school students participated in Summer Bridge. Learn more about last year’s program or contact Dr. Tolessa Deksissa for more information.

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