The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking a Senior Executive Manager

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking a senior executive for the position of Manager, Richland Operations Office in SE WA State.

This position has full authority and responsibility to manage and oversee contract organizations performing cleanup activities on the Hanford Site. This position is also responsible for budget recommendations and program execution for technically, scientifically, and institutionally sound integrated contract and project management that includes compliance requirements in an environmentally sound and safe manner. Scope of work includes managing a portfolio of cleanup projects whose lifecycle costs are in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

For information on how to apply, visit USAJOBS at https://www.usajobs.gov/seniorexecutives Under “Keyword” enter DOE-RL-14-049

 

U.S. Department of the Interior Office of the Solicitor Legal Internship / Externship Program

U.S. Department of the Interior Office of the Solicitor Legal Internship / Externship Program

Program Application Schedule

Opening Date Closing Date Semester Year Status
August 1, 2014 September 1, 2014 2015 Spring 1L, 2L, 3L  
November 1, 2014 January 1, 2015 2015 Summer 2L, 3L
December 1, 2014 January 1, 2015 2015 Summer 1L

The Office of the Solicitor is responsible for the legal work of the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), with nearly 200 practicing attorneys in the headquarters office and more than 300 attorneys nationwide. DOI is the Nation’s premier conservation agency. Our mission is to protect America’s treasures for future generations, provide access to our nation’s natural and cultural heritage, offer recreation opportunities, honor our trust responsibilities to American Indians and Alaska Natives and our responsibilities to island communities, conduct scientific research, provide wise stewardship of energy and mineral resources, foster sound use of land and water resources, and conserve and protect fish and wildlife. The work that we do through our offices and bureaus (including the National Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Geological Survey, Bureau of Reclamation, Office of Surface Mining, and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement) affects the lives of millions of people; from the family taking a vacation in a national park to a child studying in an Indian school.

With this diverse work load and the demand of extensive litigation and program counseling, the Office is continually looking for talented, dedicated law students with an interest in gaining practical experience advising agencies on the legal aspects of their mission as well as participating in complex civil litigation before administrative tribunals or assisting the Justice Department in litigating matters before federal courts. Our legal interns/externs are called upon to conduct legal research on a variety of environmental and administrative law issues, as well as issues involving Indian law. The Office resolves appeals under the Freedom of Information Act and is also home to the Department’s Ethics Office. Students typically draft legal memoranda, briefs and motions, and assist with discovery in active federal cases. Students may participate in conference calls and strategy sessions with other agency counsel, including Justice Department lawyers and agency officials. There may be additional opportunities to attend hearings and meetings in the Washington, D.C. area.

Because of our unique responsibilities to support the Department’s programs to benefit American Indians and Alaska Natives, Native American candidates are strongly encouraged to apply. The United States Government does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, political affiliation, sexual orientation, marital status, disability, age, membership in an employee organization, or other non-merit factor.

Qualifications:  To qualify, you must be a student in good standing at an accredited law school with excellent legal research and writing skills.

How to Apply:  Students should submit the following documents:

  1. Resume  with 2 professional or academic references
  2. Student Volunteer Application Form (designate locations/organizations for which you wish to be considered).
  3. Cover Letter
  4. Copy of most recent transcript (official or unofficial)
  5. Writing Sample (no more than 3 pages)

*A consolidated .PDF file of all documents submitted for consideration (with the resume as the first page) is preferred.

Please submit application packages via EMAIL to studentemployment@sol.doi.gov

Please include in the subject line: “INTERNSHIP APPLICATION - YEAR and SEMESTER

If you have questions regarding this program, you may contact Kimberly Benton, (202) 208-6240 or  Lori Jarman, (202) 208-5764.

National Hispanic Environmental Council (NHEC) – 13th annual, national “New Mexico Minority Youth Environmental Training Institute – July 25—Aug 3, 2014, in New Mexico

The National Hispanic Environmental Council (NHEC) is accepting applications from students from across the country and Puerto Rico to attend our 13th annual, national “New Mexico Minority Youth Environmental Training Institute”, to be held July 25—Aug 3, 2014, at national forests, national parks, and other environment sites in northern New Mexico.  This is one of 3 such Institutes NHEC runs (others in CA and NYC) each summer as we work to build the next generation of Latino enviro leaders, professionals and scientists.  Interested students should apply promptly for this unique opportunity.

The NM Institute is an intensive, residential, science-based, 10 day long environmental education and environment career program for top students, aged 17-20 (typically high school seniors and freshmen, sophomores, or juniors in college) competitively selected from across the U.S.  The Institute is held and students housed/fed at the Glorieta Conference Center, in Glorieta, NM, 15 miles north of Santa Fe.

Through a full scholarship, NHEC will cover ALL costs for selected students, including airfare; housing; meals, science equipment; and more.   Utilizing an Environmental STEM curriculum students will explore a wide range of environmental/natural resource issues, as well as conduct field studies (air, soil, water testing, biological assessments, birding, and more) using professional-grade environmental science equipment, taught by NHEC’s experienced instructors.

Also participating are volunteer role models — environmental professionals, many minority, from every discipline but especially the sciences — coming to engage and inspire students to pursue an environmental or conservation career.

The major sponsors for the NM Institute are the U.S. Forest Service; the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service; and the U.S. EPA.  Students will also learn about federal internships and youth jobs with these agencies and others.  Our federal sponsors are actively recruiting top students of color to work for them in 2014 and next year too.  So if you are passionate about the environment, enjoy science, have a minimum 3.0 GPA, AND seek a job in the environment field, this program is for you.     

1. there is no deadline per se; NHEC reviews applications and selects students on a rolling basis as received, until all slots are filled.  Thus students are strongly urged to apply asap; and,

2. as this is a federally funded program, eligibility is limited to U.S. Citizens and Permanent Legal Residents.

We also ask that you forward this email on to those you think may be interested in this exciting program, including qualified students, educators, high schools, colleges, youth/enviro organizations, and more.  We appreciate your help.

Please contact NHEC, especially our Programs Coordinator, Juan Rodriguez, at  jrodriguez@nheec1.org  or rrivera@nheec1.org  if you have further questions.  Or call NHEC at 703-683-3956.   You can also download the materials and learn more about NHEC/our Institutes thru our website at  www.nheec1.org

 

PRESS RELEASE: Chinese Government signs MOU with Historically Black Colleges & Universities in Beijing Today

Chinese Government signs Memorandum of Understanding with Historically Black Colleges & Universities in Beijing Today

HBCUs and Chinese universities meet to discuss implementation of 1,000 scholarships for HBCU students to study in China

(BEIJING) – A delegation of presidents and senior administrators from eight American Historically Black Colleges & Universities signed an MOU today with the China Education Association for International Exchange (CEAIE), China’s nationwide nonprofit organization conducting international educational exchanges and cooperation on behalf of the Ministry of Education.

The delegation also participated in the HBCUs-Chinese Universities Roundtable where they engaged in dialogue with their Chinese university counterparts to discuss mutually agreed upon processes for implementing the 1,000-scholarship award initiative.

“We’re delighted to be a part of this historic moment in progressive global student exchange and study. This collaboration between the Chinese government and HBCUs provides an excellent opportunity to enable our students to become competent in Chinese history and culture, and will significantly enhance their abilities to be successful global leaders throughout the world,” said Dr. David Wilson, president of Morgan State University and the delegation’s leader. Dr. Wilson signed the MOU on behalf of the delegation.

The MOU formally acknowledges the 1,000 scholarships for HBCU students announced by Vice Premier Liu Yandong at a November 2013 Capitol Hill meeting in Washington, D.C. between leadership of the Congressional Black Caucus and HBCU presidents from Howard University, Morgan State University, Tougaloo College and Xavier University of Louisiana.

The HBCUs meetings in Beijing this week are parallel to the 5th U.S.-China Consultation on People to People Exchange (CPE) being held in Beijing from July 9-11, 2014. The CPE is co-hosted by U.S. Sec. Of State John Kerry and China’s Vice Premier Madam Liu Yandong, China’s highest-ranking government official overseeing education. The CPE is designed to enhance and strengthen ties between the citizens of the United States and the People’s Republic of China in the areas of culture, education, science and technology, sports, and women’s issues. On Wednesday, July 10, the HBCU delegation will attend the closing session of the CPE meetings with Sec. Kerry and Vice Premier Liu.

The HBCU trip to China is the culmination of the collective works of the Chinese government and the China-U.S. Exchange Foundation (CUSEF), a Hong Kong-based nonprofit organization that encourages and facilitates exchanges among public policy makers, civic leaders, think tanks, academia, and business organizations in the U.S. and China to enhance understanding and mutually beneficial relationships. CUSEF hosted and organized the first meeting of the HBCUs with Vice Premier Liu during the HBCU’s first visit to China in September 2013.

The other HBCU delegates to Beijing are: Dr. Beverly Hogan, president of Tougaloo College, Dr. John S. Wilson, Jr., president of Morehouse College; Dr. Pamela Hammond, provost of Hampton University; Dr. Weldon Jackson, provost of Bowie State University; Dr. Myra Burnett, vice provost of Spelman College; Dr. Barbara Inman, V.P. for Student Affairs, Hampton University; Dr. T. Joan Robinson, V.P. Division of International Affairs, Morgan State University; Dr. Anthony Wutoh, Assistant Provost for International Affairs, Howard University; Dr. Kathleen Kennedy, dean of the School of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana; Dr. Clarissa Myrick-Harris, dean of Humanities & Social Sciences, Morehouse College; Dr. Loye Ashton, director of International Studies, Tougaloo College; and Dr. Ruihua Shen, director of Chinese Studies, Morehouse College.

A key goal of the HBCU – Chinese University Collaboration is to encourage and increase international educational study opportunities for diverse students to study in China. The HBCU delegation’s visit from the U.S. side is managed and organized by Julia Wilson, CEO and founder of Wilson Global Communications, an international consultant to the HBCU pilot group, and the liaison representative for the China-United States Exchange Foundation (CUSEF). In China, the CEAIE is managing logistics on behalf of the Ministry of Education.

The Southern Education Foundation releases the Performance Funding Report for MSIs

The Southern Education Foundation is proud to announce the release of:

Performance Funding at MSIs
Considerations and Possible Measures for Public Minority-Serving Institutions Report

As states increasingly allocate higher education funds based on measures of institutional performance there must be a critical consideration of the implications of such funding models for campuses with unique missions and/or student populations, like Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs).

View the full report here: http://www.southerneducation.org/cmspages/getfile.aspx?guid=9356be8d-5a39-45f7-ad54-089d7050b5c0

National Science Foundation toolkit highlights impact of NSF investments

National Science Foundation toolkit highlights impact of NSF investments Toolkit includes new video on merit review, infographics and directorate brochures
NSF’s Data By Design infographics are a snapshot of NSF’s programs, processes, funding and impact. Credit: NSF Credit and Larger Version

Today the National Science Foundation (NSF) released a robust toolkit that includes new videos, infographics, fact sheets and brochures that describe NSF investments in fundamental research and how they contribute to the nation’s science and engineering enterprise.

“NSF’s toolkit offers a range of information about the vital work of the Foundation in a compelling way using modern communications methods,” said NSF’s Office of Legislative and Public Affairs Director Judith Gan. “We encourage the NSF community and the general public to explore the materials we’re releasing today to learn more about how the agency helps our nation remain at the competitive forefront of discovery and innovation.”

Part of the toolkit package is an animated, NSF-produced video describing the agency’s rigorous merit review process. The agency also developed infographics called, “Data by Design: Snapshot of NSF’s Programs, Processes, Funding & Impact.” These colorful charts showcase the Foundation’s role in building tomorrow’s workforce, driving innovation, influencing national and international discoveries, and facilitating interdisciplinary collaborations.

In addition, NSF developed brochures that highlight each directorate’s contributions to pushing the frontiers of science, engineering and education. These contributions include the fundamental research that led to self-driving cars, the artificial retina, modeling seismic waves, accuracy of GPS devices, real-time emergency information to emergency workers and residents, unraveling cancer, rescue robots, building a diverse STEM workforce, and more.

For more than 60 years, NSF has supported fundamental researchers who devote time, inspiration and hard work to unraveling mysteries, solving problems, spurring the economy and offering insights into our world. NSF’s research directorates include biological sciences, computer and information sciences, education and human resources, engineering, geosciences, mathematical and physical sciences, and social, behavioral and economic sciences.

Have you Heard? Bowie State University Partners with Local, State Public Safety on First Responder Mobile Applications

We thought you might be interested in our recent blog article about Bowie State University working with Prince George’s County to establish a program that supports the development of wireless broadband applications and security for the FirstNet public safety broadband network.

The post is available on our website at http://firstnet.gov/newsroom/blog/maryland-college-partners-local-state-public-safety-first-responder-mobile

More About FirstNet:

FirstNet’s mission is to develop, build and operate the country’s first nationwide broadband network dedicated to public safety.

http://firstnet.gov/

Fayetteville State Awarded $718K Naval Research Grant

High school students in Fayetteville, NC and undergraduates at Fayetteville State University will soon have access to training and career preparation in military research and development, thanks to a $718,338 grant from the Office of Naval Research.

Through two outreach programs designed to engage HBCU students and to increase minority participation in the sciences, FSU’s Center for Defense and Homeland Security will oversee STEM instructional delivery to local high school students and enhanced research opportunities for undergraduates.

FSU officials expect for 20 undergraduate students to complete research at Naval Research Laboratories over the life of the three-year grant.

Get More Details Here: Fayetteville State Awarded $718K Naval Research Grant

Tennessee State Selected for National Environmental Health Program

Tennessee State University was recently announced as part of a national consortium of colleges and universities partnering with the Environmental Protection Agency to promote awareness of air toxicity.

The 2014 Toxic Release Inventory University Challenge promotes student innovation in raising awareness around environmental hazards in communities nationwide. TSU was selected from a pool of 11 institutional applicants, and will conduct research and awareness campaigns through its Geographic Information Sciences Laboratory.

The winning proposal was submitted by associate Geography professor Dr. David A. Padgett. Tennessee State is the only historically Black college in this year’s consortium.

Get More Details here: Tennessee State Selected for National Environmental Health Program

FAMU Professor and Engineering Student Named Fulbright Scholars

FAMU Professor and Engineering Student Named Fulbright Scholars

Researchers will study Nigerian plants to find engineering, medical solutions

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida A&M University (FAMU) mechanical engineering doctoral candidate Renee Gordon and biochemistry professor Ngozi Ugochukwu, Ph.D., have been named Fulbright Scholars. The prestigious Fulbright Scholars Program is a highly competitive international education exchange program that awards grants to students, faculty or professionals who wish to study, teach and conduct research abroad. Both Gordon and Ugochukwu will conduct respective research on the indigenous resources of Nigeria.

ReneeGordon

Renee Gordon, Engineering Student Takes Green Ambitions to Nigeria
Gordon is the first student in the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering to receive the Fulbright grant. Her research will focus on using biomass, specifically Nigeria’s cassava leaves, as a green alternative to case hardening steel. She will reside at Nigeria’s Federal University of Technology (FUT) in Akure, which partners with FAMU in a mutual teaching and research exchange program.

According to Gordon, receiving the Fulbright grant brings her closer to fulfilling her desire to do something “forward thinking and innovative” with the indigenous resources of Nigeria. Her goal upon completing her Ph.D. is to work in green engineering with a focus on sustainable and alternative energy and to eventually return to FAMU as a professor to share her knowledge and experiences with others.

“It’s about using sustainable materials and resources that don’t take away from our fossil fuels and using materials that can be regenerated and regrown,” said Gordon about the focus of her research, which picks up where her mentor and research supervisor Peter Kalu, Ph.D. left off.

Kalu, a 3M Distinguished Research Professor in Mechanical Engineering at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering and 2009-2010 Fulbright Scholar, also conducted research on how Nigeria’s cassava leaves could be used as an alternative method for hardening metal. His research was essential to the establishment of FAMU’s exchange program with FUT.

“We’re making headway there and she’s going to really take the research further,” said Kalu, expressing confidence in his protégé’s potential.

Gordon is a first generation American citizen by way of Jamaica, and first generation college graduate. She said receiving the Fulbright grant is a milestone in the progress of her research after having to overcome several obstacles in order to continue her work.

When Gordon and Kalu were invited to present their research at the Fifth International Conference on Structural Engineering, Mechanics and Computation in Cape Town, South Africa in 2013, the duo had planned to have research samples delivered to Nigeria to complete an important heat treatment process phase of the cassava project, however a lack of resources and funding limited them in getting the samples to their destination, until then-Interim President Larry Robinson, Ph.D., stepped in to help.

After receiving the funding they needed, Gordon and Kalu were able to journey to Nigeria for six days prior to their presentation in South Africa, complete the heat treatment and return stateside to continue the research.

“My mom has always instilled in me that I should go as far as I can with my education,” said

Gordon. “I’ve had a lot of hurdles and stumbling blocks, so it’s great for it to come full circle.”

NgoziUgochukwu

Ngozi Ugochukwu, Ph.D., Professor Journeys to Nigeria to Combat Diabetes
Ugochukwu will also complete her research in Nigeria at FUT in Minna. Her research will focus on ethnopharmacology, the study of ethnic groups and their use of drugs. She will also conduct research on bioactive compounds and their role as leads for drug discovery, and uses for traditional medicine in diabetes therapy.

Ugochukwu has been researching diabetes since her tenure began at FAMU in 1998. Her expertise includes the use of biochemical and gene technology techniques in deciphering the underlying mechanisms in the pathophysiology of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, congestive heart failure and colon cancer. Her research focus also includes finding effective preventive strategies and therapies for these diseases.

“Diabetes is considered by the World Health Organization and International Diabetes Foundation as one of the major threats to human health in the 21st century,” said Ugochukwu. “The Fulbright grant will give me the opportunity to collaborate with researchers at the FUT Minna Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology and the Global Institute for Bio-exploration to scientifically screen and identify anti-diabetic bioactive phytonutrients in indigenous Nigerian plants.”

According to Ugochukwu, this collaborative research could accelerate the discovery and development of new phytopharmaceuticals for diabetes therapy.

Her passion for diabetes research began while she was working on her Ph.D. in Nigeria. Her mission then was to find a fundamental human chronic disease that didn’t have a cure. Her research ultimately led her to diabetes.

“I have this inner quest to find some form of therapy for diabetes,” Ugochukwu said. “Especially because I have done research on the underlying root causes, which are oxidative stress and inflammation. So, discovering anything that will quell those things will be key.”

“I work with chronic diseases like hypertension, heart disease, congestive heart failure, colon cancer and the like, and underneath them all you see diabetes surfacing its ugly head,” she added.

In addition to her research, Ugochukwu will teach classes in biochemical pharmacology, clinical biochemistry and biochemistry laboratory including virtual proteomics exercises.

She attributes much of her success in research to the support of the FAMU research community, especially her students.

“I am elated about my selection as a Fulbright grantee,” Ugochukwu said. “It’s quite an honor to be recognized by this prestigious body. However, I must attribute this to the collaborative research work my graduate students and I have conducted on chronic diseases over the years at FAMU.”