Empowering Working Families Across America with Valerie Jarrett and Mayor Kasim Reed- July 7th

With Special Thanks to the City of Atlanta and Mayor Kasim Reed,

The White House and Department of Labor invite you to participate in an

  Armchair Conversation on “Lead on Leave: Empowering Working Families Across America”

Building on the President’s State of the Union announcements supporting greater workplace flexibility for families, the White House and the Department of Labor are pleased to invite you to our next step in the “Lead on Leave: Empowering Working Families Across America” tour. We hope you can join Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed, and Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women & Girls Valerie Jarrett for this important conversation about how to support working families across the nation.

When:            Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Please arrive by 11:00 AM. The program will begin at 11:15 AM

Where:           Atlanta City Hall

Old Council Chambers

68 Mitchell St SW

Atlanta, GA 30303

RSVP:  Please RSVP with first name, last name, organization, and e-mail address to cwg@who.eop.gov by Monday, July 6 at 10:00 AM Eastern Time.  RSVPs will be honored on a ‘first-come, first-served’ basis. Please send on to others who may be interested in the conversation.

For questions, please e-mail the White House Council on Women & Girls at cwg@who.eop.gov or call (202) 456-4853.

 

White House Celebrates Entreprenuers Around the World

The White House Celebrates Entrepreneurs Around the World

On Monday, the President welcomed emerging entrepreneurs from across the country and around the world to the White House to honor their achievements in their fields of business. He also announced new commitments in support of the Spark Global Entrepreneurship Initiative — a bold goal of generating $1 billion in new investment for emerging entrepreneurs worldwide by 2017.

READ MORE

Email from Broderick Johnson on the My Brother’s Keeper Alliance

White House Seal

Today, I will join President Obama as he travels to Lehman College in the Bronx, NY to speak about the importance of expanding opportunity and to applaud a new private-sector entity — the My Brother’s Keeper Alliance.A group of private-sector leaders and other prominent private citizens, led by Joe Echevarria (the former CEO of Deloitte LLP) have come together to form this new, independent non-profit. Joined by a diverse range of philanthropic, community, and private-sector partners, leaders of the Alliance are pledging to work to expand opportunity for youth, strengthen the American workforce, and fortify the economic stability of communities across America.

The Alliance will join other private-sector organizations all across America to focus on expanding opportunity and tearing down barriers facing our youth so that we can truly say the American Dream is available to all.

Meanwhile, at the White House, the work of the President’s My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) Task Force, which it is my honor to chair, will continue to move forward on the work the President has charged us with. We will continue — with great urgency — to disseminate best practices, strengthen federal policy, and implement strategies to support communities in their efforts to expand opportunity for all youth.

When President Obama first announced the My Brother’s Keeper initiative from the East Room of the White House in February 2014, he framed it as a call to action for every American to recognize that “my neighbor’s child is my child” — that each of us has an obligation to give every child the same chance this country has given so many of us.

Over the past year, foundations, corporations, small business owners, educators, philanthropies, law enforcement, artists, athletes, and all levels of government from across the country have responded with remarkable energy and resolve, and they have announced an array of fresh initiatives to attack the challenges facing our youth in new ways.

Over the course of the Administration, we have made consistent progress on important goals, such as reducing high school dropout rates and lowering unemployment and crime.

Yet persistent gaps in employment, educational outcomes, and career skills remain, barring too many youth from realizing their full potential, and creating harmful social and economic costs to our nation.

Over the past year, we already have made progress addressing the central goals originally laid out by the President’s MBK Task Force to ensure that all young people enter school ready to learn, all young people are reading at grade level by the third grade, all youth are graduating from high school ready for college and career, all youth are completing postsecondary education or training, all young people are successfully entering the workforce, and all young people are safe from violence and provided the second chances they deserve.

Here are some examples on how we are working to achieve these goals:

Beyond the work of the President’s MBK Task Force, there are now more than 200 communities that have accepted the President’s My Brother’s Keeper Community Challenge, committing to launching Local Action Plans with bold goals and strategies to produce results that will bridge opportunity gaps.

And, since the President’s call to action in February 2014, nearly $500 million in grants and in-kind resources have been independently committed by the private sector to attack the challenges facing our youth in new ways and expand opportunity, including a $100 million announcement just last week from Equal Opportunity Schools and its partners to increase enrollment of low-income and minority students in advance courses.

For so many of us, the My Brother’s Keeper initiative is deeply personal. As a proud son of Baltimore, this week’s announcement comes at a time of unique and special resonance for me.

As the country reflects on our shared responsibility to ensure that opportunity reaches every young person, I urge everyone to look at their own capacity to make a difference. Whether it’s taking time to mentor, tutoring young people in your neighborhood, or creating new internship or apprenticeship opportunities for young people in your community — everyone can play a role in building a brighter future.

The President’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative is about recognizing that our young people are not the problem, but rather the solution. And it’s about each of us seeing our neighbor’s child as our own. Their futures as individuals, and as members of a shared community and economy, are forever tied together.

As we move further into the fourth quarter of President Obama’s time in office, our entire team is following his lead and preparing to accomplish as much as we possibly can with the MBK Task Force. And as leaders like Joe Echevarria, MBK Alliance honorary chair John Legend, and their colleagues take initiative to respond to the challenges facing our youth in new ways — big and small, locally and nationally — I share the President’s confidence that we will begin to see a future come into focus that is increasingly inclusive, empowering, and rich with opportunity for all Americans.

We welcome the newly organized My Brother’s Keeper Alliance to this work, and look forward to the progress they will help build.

Broderick Johnson Chair, My Brother’s Keeper Task Force The White House

Please do not reply to this email. Contact the White House

The White House • 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW • Washington, DC 20500 • 202-456-1111

Job Opportunities with U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Office of Minority and Women Inclusion (OMWI) has job opportunities available.

Brief Background:

OMWI was established in July of 2011, as required by Section 342 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010.  OMWI is responsible for:

  • taking affirmative steps to seek diversity at all levels of the SEC’s workforce,
  • increasing participation of minority-owned and women-owned businesses in the SEC’s programs and contracts, including standards for coordinating technical assistance to such businesses; and
  • assessing the diversity policies and practices of entities regulated by the SEC.

For more information regardign the job opportunities see : Vacancy Announcement or contact

Germon Rochez
Recruitment Coordinator
Phone: 202-551-6046
omwi@sec.gov

 

 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Released Funding Opportunities

HHS office of Minority Heatlh has released a newletter with funding and grant opportunities for Minority Serving Institutions. Visit the link below to find more information on future solicitations that might be of interest to HBCUs.

 HHS Funding and Grant  Opportunities

FOR MORE INFORMATON ABOUT THE OFFICE OF MINORITY HEALTH VISIT

www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov

 

U.S. Department of the Interior’s Grants Notices (Opened to Colleges and Universities)

U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service

Funding Opportunity Number: P14AS00125

Funding Opportunity Title: Long Term Monitoring of Southern Colorado Plateau Network

Opportunity Category: Discretionary

Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement

Category of Funding Activity:  Education Employment, Labor and Training Environment Natural Resources Regional Development Science and Technology and other Research and Development

Posted Date: June 9, 2014

Original Closing Date for Applications: Jun 23, 2014

Estimated Total Program Funding: $195,000

Description:

NOTICE OF INTENT TO AWARD This Funding Announcement is not a request for applications. This announcement is to provide public notice of the National Park Service¿s intention to fund the following project activities without full and open competition. ABSTRACT Funding Announcement P14AS00125 Project Title Long Term Monitoring of Southern Colorado Plateau Network Recipient Northern Arizona University CP-CESU Principle Investigator / Program Manager Dr. James Allen Total Anticipated Award Amount $195,000.00 Cost Share none New Award or Continuation? Continuation of Cooperative Agreement H2370094001 Anticipated Length of Agreement From Date of award until 12/31/2016 Anticipated Period of Performance From Date of award until 12/31/2016 Award Instrument Cooperative Agreement Statutory Authority 16 USC 1(g) CFDA # and Title Single Source Justification Criteria Cited (2) Continuation NPS Point of Contact June Zastrow 303-987-6718 june_zastrow@nps.gov OVERVIEW Cooperative Agreement Number H2370094001 was entered into by and between the Department of the Interior, National Park Service (NPS), and Northern Arizona University (NAU) for the purpose of providing field ecology and technical support for long-term monitoring in Southern Colorado Plateau Network (SCPN) parks. The purpose of the monitoring program is to improve our scientific understanding of the status and trends in the condition of a targeted subset of park resources, thus contributing to describing regional resource conditions. Unless otherwise specified herein, the terms and conditions as stated in the Cooperative Agreement will apply to this Task Agreement. Field Ecology and Technical Support for Long-Term Monitoring in National Parks of the SCPN As part of the SCPN Vital Signs monitoring program, this project contributes to understanding the current status and tracking trends in condition through time for a selected suite of indicators of ecosystem condition. The purpose of the project described herein is for SCPN and NAU to collaborate to conduct long-term monitoring of upland, riparian/aquatic and landscape-level indicators in targeted park ecosystems and to communicate monitoring results to a broad audience of park managers, partners and the general public. Through this collaboration, NPS and NAU will contribute to describing regional ecological integrity and furthering scientific understanding of the current conditions of park resources, which often serve as reference conditions when evaluating the condition of public lands that are more impacted by human use. Results from this project will be publicly available through the SCPN website (http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/scpn/index.cfm) and the Learning Center of the American Southwest website (http://www.southwestlearning.org/). RECIPIENT INVOLVEMENT 1. To implement long-term water resources monitoring of selected SCPN streams and springs and to collaborate with the SCPN staff toward the completion of water resources monitoring protocols and reports. Monitoring topics include 1) riparian ecosystems, 2) aquatic macroinvertebrates, 3) water quality, and 4) spring ecosystems. 2. To implement long-term upland vegetation and soils monitoring within selected upland ecological sites and to collaborate with the SCPN staff toward the completion of upland monitoring reports. 3. To implement the SCPN Data Management Plan and to to collaborate with the SCPN staff toward developing and maintaining the program¿s data management and GIS capabilities. 4. To collaborate with SCPN staff to provide technical writing, editing, and report preparation. The writer/editor will work in collaboration with SCPN staff to produce Natural Resource Technical Report Series publications and other web-based or printed materials for the program, thus promoting the communication of I&M results to NPS managers, partners and the broader public. NAU will also provide printing services support to prepare final reports for distribution to SCPN parks, cooperators and the public. 5. To collaborate with SCPN staff to develop science communication materials about the natural resources of SCPN parks and related NPS management and science issues/activities. These projects will contribute to public understanding of park resources and resource topics and may be written for the SCPN and/or LCAS websites. A NAU School of Communication Intern will be involved in some of these projects. 6. To provide support for the Learning Center of the American Southwest (LCAS) website in coordination with SCPN and the Chihuahuan, Sonoran, and Southern Plains Networks. 7. Through Deaver Herbarium, to resolve NPS herbarium collection record issues in order to improve tracking of NPS collections. This will also contribute to a more accurate regional understanding of the distribution of plant species across the Colorado Plateau. 8. To provide project oversight and administration. The NAU Principal Investigator will supervise the NAU staff involved with tasks above and will serve as a senior scientist providing scientific review and guidance, as well as coordination with SCPN staff. NATIONAL PARK SERVICE INVOLVEMENT Substantial involvement on the part the National Park Service is anticipated for the successful completion of the objectives to be funded by this award. In particular, the National Park Service will be responsible for the following: SCPN staff will work collaboratively with NAU to complete monitoring protocols. NPS Staff will select systems & sites for monitoring & will provide training/oversight for monitoring work. SCPN GIS specialist will provide sampling design & GPS Support. SCPN data managers will develop database formats & metadata standards for documenting results of NAU monitoring. SCPN staff will work with NAU to communicate research results to NPS resource managers & the public. Substantial involvement is also necessary to ensure NPS I&IM data standards are met & to provide substantive review of data products and the reports. SINGLE-SOURCE JUSTIFICATION DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SINGLE SOURCE POLICY REQUIREMENTS Department of the Interior Policy (505 DM 2) requires a written justification which explains why competition is not practicable for each single-source award. The justification must address one or more of the following criteria as well as discussion of the program legislative history, unique capabilities of the proposed recipient, and cost-sharing contribution offered by the proposed recipient, as applicable. In order for an assistance award to be made without competition, the award must satisfy one or more of the following criteria: (1) Unsolicited Proposal ¿ The proposed award is the result of an unsolicited assistance application which represents a unique or innovative idea, method, or approach which is not the subject of a current or planned contract or assistance award, but which is deemed advantageous to the program objectives; (2) Continuation ¿ The activity to be funded is necessary to the satisfactory completion of, or is a continuation of an activity presently being funded, and for which competition would have a significant adverse effect on the continuity or completion of the activity; (3) Legislative intent ¿ The language in the applicable authorizing legislation or legislative history clearly indicates Congress¿ intent to restrict the award to a particular recipient of purpose; (4) Unique Qualifications ¿ The applicant is uniquely qualified to perform the activity based upon a variety of demonstrable factors such as location, property ownership, voluntary support capacity, cost-sharing ability if applicable, technical expertise, or other such unique qualifications; (5) Emergencies ¿ Program/award where there is insufficient time available (due to a compelling and unusual urgency, or substantial danger to health or safety) for adequate competitive procedures to be followed. The National Park Service did not solicit full and open competition for this award based the following criteria: (2) CONTINUATION SINGLE SOURCE JUSTIFICATION DESCRIPTION: THIS IS A NOTICE OF INTENT TO AWARD This is a Task Agreement (P14AC00859) under Cooperative Agreement (H2370094001) in the amount of $195,000.00 with a period of performance from date of award until 12/31/2014. “This proposed project between Northern Arizona University and the National Park Service is authorized to go through the Colorado Plateau CESU at the negotiated overhead rate of 17.5% because it passes the test of substantial involvement by the NPS, public purpose and consistency with the mission of the CESU Network” Also, on the SF 424 forms that the partner sponsored programs office fills out for each project, requires a CFDA number – 15.945, which is the number associated with the CFDA Title: COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND TRAINING PROGRAMS – RESOURCES OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (CESU). STATUTORY AUTHORITY A. 16 U.S.C. §1g authorizes the NPS to enter into cooperative agreements that involve the transfer of NPS appropriated funds to state, local and tribal governments, other public entities, educational institutions, and private nonprofit organizations for the public purpose of carrying out National Park Service programs. B. 16 U.S.C. §1a-2(j) Cooperative research and training programs. Authorizes the NPS to enter into cooperative agreements with public or private educational institutions, states, and their political subdivisions, for the purpose of developing adequate, coordinated, cooperative research and training programs concerning the resources of the national park system. Pursuant to such agreements, the cooperator may accept from or make available to the NPS technical and support staff, financial assistance for mutually agreed upon research projects, supplies and equipment, facilities, and administrative services relating to cooperative research units as the Secretary deems appropriate (research projects subject to Federal Acquisition Regulation excluded). Modified 5/31/05 ¿ Agreement Handbook Memorandum Number 2 C. 16 U.S.C. §5933 Cooperative agreements. The Secretary is authorized and directed to enter into cooperative agreements with colleges and universities, including but not limited to land grant schools, in partnership with other Federal and State agencies, to establish cooperative study units to conduct multi-disciplinary research and develop integrated information products on the resources of the National Park System, or the larger region of which parks are a part.

Link to additional information:   http://www.grants.gov

If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:  June Zastrow, 303-987-6718 June_Zastrow@nps.gov

LANDRIEU SECURES $224 MILLION FOR HBCUS

Bill gets final vote this week 

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Mary L. Landrieu, D-La., today secured $224 million for the nation’s 105 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) as part of the bill that will fund the government for FY2014. The bill rolls back $8 million in previously scheduled cuts. Louisiana’s six HBCUs – Dillard University, Grambling State University, Southern University and A&M College, Southern University at New Orleans, Southern University at Shreveport and Xavier University of Louisiana – can apply for this funding to continue educating students, as they have done for nearly 150 years. The bill is anticipated to pass this week and then head to the President for his expected signature.

“Historically Black Colleges and Universities represent a valuable element of the American education system, and they have been cornerstones in our communities for decades and many Louisiana families have counted on them to gain the skills and education necessary for greater economic security. This funding will provide the financial support necessary for our HBCUs to continue providing quality and affordable higher education for all children. I look forward to continue working with Louisiana’s six HBCUs and fighting for funding for their continued growth to educate and develop the next generation of leaders in Louisiana,” said Sen. Landrieu.

Sen. Landrieu has long supported Louisiana’s HBCUs. Last year, Sen. Landrieu authored legislation to save HBCUs in Louisiana over $200 million with loan modification for loans received as a result of Hurricane Katrina.

For her commitment to HBCUs, the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education awarded a Sen. Landrieu their Congressional Award.

WHI-HBCU Presents: 2014 HBCU All Star Students

Note: The HBCU All-Star program is not a grant, contract, employment, or internship opportunity.

 

2014 HBCU All Stars

ALABAMA

Huntsville–Sharesse Mason –attends Alabama A&M University, Normal

Mobile–Justin Wells –attends Bishop State Community College, Mobile, AL

Aliceville–Keiwan Harris –attends Concordia College Alabama, Selma, AL

Tuscaloosa–Morgan Curry –attends Shelton State Community College, Tuscaloosa, AL

Tuscaloosa–Jeraun Pouge –attends Stillman College,  Tuscaloosa, AL

Talladega–Chuck Stewart –attends Talladega College, Talladega, AL

Tuskegee—Kalauna Carter –attends Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL

ARKANSAS

Little Rock–Chelsea Fox –attends Philander Smith, Little Rock, AR

CALIFORNIA

Los Angeles–Nicole Tinson –attends Dillard University, New Orleans, LA

Fresno–Arogeanae Brown –attends Virginia State University, Petersbury, Virginia

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Tyrone Hankerson –attends Howard University, District of Columbia

-Jocelyn Cole –attends Howard University, District of Columbia

-LaTrice Clayburn –attends Livingstone College, Salisbury, NC

Abdul Nurriddin –attends University of the District of Columbia Community College, District of Columbia

FLORIDA

Daytona–Shantel Braynen –attends Bethune-Cookman University, Daytona Beach, FL

Tallahassee–Jamil McGinnis –attends Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL

Tallahassee–Jazmyne Simmons –attends Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL

Miami–Jonte Myers –attends Florida Memorial University, Miami Gardens, FL

Orlando–Vivian Nweze –attends Howard University, District of Columbia

GEORGIA

Riverdale–Kelcey Wright –attends Albany State University, Albany, GA

Atlanta–Lillian Harris –attends Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA

Rex–Elijah Porter –attends Fort Valley State University, Fort Valley, GA

Atlanta–Cameron Weathers –attends Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA

Atlanta–David Johnny –attends Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA

Atlanta–Sarah Dillard –attends Savannah State University, Savannah, GA

Albany–Bria Carrithers –attends Spelman College,  Atlanta, GA

KENTUCKY

Frankfort–Chaundra Bush –attends Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY

LOUISIANA

Grambling–Breonna Ward –attends Grambling State University, Grambling, LA

Ruston–Brooke Battiste –attends Grambling State University, Grambling, LA

Zachary–Robert Chambers –attends Southern University A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA

MARYLAND

Accokeek–Symone Jordan –attends Bowie State University, Bowie, MD

Fort Washington–Kayla Reynolds –attends Delaware State University, Dover, DE

Baltimore–Triston Bing-Young –attends Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD

Fort Washington–Trevor McKie –attends Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD

Silver Spring–Chanel Banks –attends University Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD

Princess Anne–So Jin Park –attends University Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD

MISSISSIPPI

Brookhaven–Lawrence Warren –attends Alcorn State University, Alcorn, MS

Jackson–Candace Chambers –attends Jackson State University, Jackson, MS

Itta Bena–Rodney Rice –attends Mississippi Valley State University, Itta Bena, MS

Holly Springs–Larrance Carter –attends Rust College, Holly Springs, MS

Bolton–Kisa Harris –attends Tougaloo College, Jackson, MS

NORTH CAROLINA

Greensboro–Jasmine Everett –attends Bennett College, Greensboro, NC

Raleigh–Victoria Jones –attends North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC

Whiteville–Valerie Edwards –attends Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, NC

Gates–Amanda Eure –attends Fayetteville State University, Fayetteville, NC

Charlotte–Jheanelle Linton –attends Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, NC

Greensboro–Shakera Fudge –attends North Carolina Agricultural &Technical State University, Greensboro

Greensboro–Leon White –attends North Carolina Agricultural &Technical State University, Greensboro

Knightdale–Joseph Wyatt –attends St. Augustine’s University, Raleigh, NC

Winston-Salem–Georges Guillame –attends Winston Salem State University, Winston Salem, NC

NEW JERSEY

Newark–Akirah Crawford –attends Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA

OKLAHOMA

Ardmore–Beautiful- Joy Fields –attends Langston University, Langston, OK

PENNSYLVANIA

Chester–Ahn-yea Graham –attends Cheyney University of PA, Cheyney, PA

SOUTH CAROLINA

Leesville–Rodrea Zeigler –attends Allen University, Columbia, SC

Orangeburg–Jessica Mong –attends Claflin University, Orangeburg, SC

Lynchburg–Refugio Banuelos –attends Morris College, Sumter, SC

Orangeburg–Harold Rickenbacker –attends South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, SC

Orangeburg–Jasmine Harris –attends South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, SC

TENNESSEE

Nashville–Ciera Carter –attends Fisk University, Nashville, TN

Jackson–Stephanie Phillips –attends Lane College, Jackson, TN

Memphis–Gilbert Carter –attends LeMoyne- Owen College, Memphis, TN

Nashville–Ciera Scales –attends Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN

Nashville–Jeremiah Cooper –attends Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN

Jackson–Aneesa Sood –attends Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL

TEXAS

Houston–Antoine Southern –attends Oakwood University, Huntsville, AL

Dallas–Priscilla Barbour –attends Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX

Cedar Hill–Glenn Johnson –attends Texas College, Tyler, TX

Houston–Jarrauri Curry –attends Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

Houston–Candace Jones –attends Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

Garland–Jade Crutch –attends Xavier University, New Orleans,  LA

VIRGINIA

Suffolk–Chanae LeGrier –attends Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, NC

Dendron–Whitney Johnson –attends Hampton University, Hampton, VA

Richmond–Caprichia Moses –attends Virginia Union University, Richmond, VA

VIRGIN ISLANDS

Christiansted–Shereena Cannonier –attends Lincoln University PA, Lincoln, PA

Christiansted–Kevin Dixon –attends University of the Virgin Islands, St. Thomas, USVI

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities ( HBCUs) works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation, and sustainability. In 2014, the Initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement.

PURPOSE

To empower and directly engage with the next generation of leaders who will graduate from HBCUs and go on to make meaningful contributions to society.

GOALS

  • Identify and formally commend current HBCU students who are simultaneously achieving their educational goals and making a difference in their community.
  • Raise awareness about the Initiative as a networking resource by sharing promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to achieve their educational and career potential.

Over the course of the year (February 2014- January 2015), HBCU All-Star Students will:

  • Serve as ambassadors of the Initiative by leveraging their social media presence and community-based organization relationships to promote the value of education;
  • Have their individual work featured on the Initiative’s website;
  • Be invited to participate in regional events, where appropriate;
  • Network with other scholars to showcase individual and/or collective talent across the HBCU community; and
  • Join quarterly webchats with Deputy Director, Ivory Toldson and other professionals.

Nominate yourself as an ALL-STAR today!

TIMELINE

Nomination Period: December 16, 2013- January 10, 2014

Selection Period: January 13, 2014- January 31, 2014

Notifications: No later than February 7, 2014

ELIGIBILITY AND RULES

1. Nominee must be a current undergraduate or graduate student at a Historically Black College or University (HBCU).

2. Only completed applications will be considered. This includes signed nomination form, unofficial transcripts, short essay, resume and endorsement.

3. Submissions entered past the due date will not be acknowledged.

Applications must be submitted by, 11:59 p.m., EST on January 10, 2014 Please submit application to: oswhi-hbcu@ed.gov

Find the 2014 ALL- STAR Application here: 2014 All-Star Application

 

CSWE’s Minority Fellowship Program (MFP), 2014-2015 Mental Health/Substance Abuse Minority Fellowship Application Period is NOW open!

CSWE’s Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) is pleased to announce that the 2014-2015 Mental Health/Substance Abuse Minority Fellowship Application Period is now open. Deadline for submission of the 2014-2015 application is Friday, February 28, 2014 at 11:59 pm (ET).

New this year: Fellowship applications will be submitted via an online submission process. Applicants should carefully review the application instructions as the fellowship program is also initiating a practice-focused shift in priorities.

Application materials are posted on the MFP “How to Apply” webpage (below) along with a link for submission of completed materials to the online submission system. Applicants will submit all materials including recommendations as part of their online application packet.

 http://www.cswe.org/CentersInitiatives/ScholarshipsandFellowships/MFP/31830.aspx

 The Mental Health & Substance Abuse Fellowship is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) for the purpose of reducing health disparities and improving health care outcomes of racially and ethnically diverse populations by increasing the number of culturally competent behavioral health professionals available to underserved populations in the public and private nonprofit sectors. The SAMHSA MFP closely aligns with the Affordable Care Act and SAMHSA’s Eight Strategic Initiatives by addressing the current and projected behavioral health workforce shortages and the need to train providers on recovery-based practices. The goal of SAMHSA’s Minority Fellowship Program is to increase the percentage of professionals who are qualified to provide leadership in research, practice, education, and policy promulgation in government and private organizations that are central to the development and implementation of culturally specific and patient-centered programs for underserved ethnic minority persons with mental health or substance abuse disorders.

 All applicants are expected to demonstrate a strong commitment to a career in behavioral health services with underserved ethnic minority individuals or communities and an interest in mental health or substance use treatment, recovery, or prevention. CSWE’s MFP is particularly interested in persons with (1) an interest in advanced clinical practice in mental health/substance use treatment and recovery or serving as behavioral health practitioners at a broadly defined level such as management/administration, policy promulgation, or community organization; (2) an interest in translational research in behavioral health with a focus on practice interventions in mental health/substance abuse prevention, treatment, or recovery; or (3) a desire to teach clinical practice in the area of mental health/substance use prevention, treatment, or recovery.

Questions: Please contact Carrie Brock, MFP Program Manager at cbrock@cswe.org or 703-519-2050 or Geraldine Meeks at gmeeks@cswe.org or 703-519-2049.