TMCF Webinar: Acing the Application Process

Learn about internship opportunities with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and how to ace the application process.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

5:30pm-6:30pm EST

To register for the webinar, please e-mail: OMWI@sec.gov- indicating TMCF 2/5 webinar in the subject line. You will be provided confirmation in addition to a call-in number and link to the session

Vice President Biden Announces $25 Million in Funding for Cybersecurity Education at HBCUs

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Vice President

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 15, 2015

Vice President Biden Announces $25 Million in Funding for Cybersecurity Education at HBCUs

 

Today, Vice President Biden, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, and White House Science Advisor John Holdren are traveling to Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia to announce that the Department of Energy will provide a $25 million grant over the next five years to support cybersecurity education. The new grant will support the creation of a new cybersecurity consortium consisting of 13 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), two national labs, and a k-12 school district.

 

The Vice President will make the announcement as part of a roundtable discussion with a classroom of cybersecurity leaders and students at Norfolk State University. The visit builds on the President’s announcements on cybersecurity earlier this week, focusing on the critical need to fill the growing demand for skilled cybersecurity professionals in the U.S. job market, while also diversifying the pipeline of talent in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. The event and announcement is also an opportunity to highlight the Administration’s ongoing commitment to HBCUs.

 

Details on the Announcement

As highlighted by the President earlier in the week, the rapid growth of cybercrime is creating a growing need for cybersecurity professionals across a range of industries, from financial services, health care, and retail to the US government itself. By some estimates, the demand for cybersecurity workers is growing 12 times faster than the U.S. job market, and is creating well-paying jobs.

 

To meet this growing need, the Department of Energy is establishing the Cybersecurity Workforce Pipeline Consortium with funding from the Minority Serving Institutions Partnerships Program housed in its National Nuclear Security Administration. The Minority Service Institutions Program focuses on building a strong pipeline of talent from minority-serving institutions to DOE labs, with a mix of research collaborations, involvement of DOE scientists in mentoring, teaching and curriculum development, and direct recruitment of students.

 

With $25M in overall funding over five years, and with the first grants this year, the Cybersecurity Workforce Pipeline Consortium will bring together 13 HBCUs, two DOE labs, and the Charleston County School District with the goal of creating a sustainable pipeline of students focused on cybersecurity issues. The consortium has a number of core attributes:

 

  • It is designed as asystem. This allows students that enter through any of the partner schools to have all consortia options available to them, to create career paths and degree options through collaboration between all the partners (labs and schools), and to open the doors to DOE sites and facilities.

 

  • It has a range of participating higher education institutions.With Norfolk State University as a the lead, the consortium includes a K-12 school district, a two-year technical college, as well as four-year public and private universities that offer graduate degrees.

 

  • Built to change to evolving employer needs:To be successful in the long term, this program is designed to be sufficiently flexible in its organization to reflect the unique regional priorities that Universities have in faculty research and developing STEM disciplines and skills, and DOE site targets for research and critical skill development.

 

  • Diversifying the pipeline by working with leading minority-serving institutions:As the President stated in Executive Order 13532, “Promoting Excellence, Innovation, and Sustainability at Historically Black Colleges and Universities” in February 2010, America’s HBCUs, for over 150 years, have produced many of the Nation’s leaders in science, business, government, academia, and the military, and have provided generations of American men and women with hope and educational opportunity.

 

The full list of participating consortium members are:

 

Virginia

Norfolk State University (lead)

 

Georgia

Clark Atlanta University

Paine College

 

Maryland

Bowie State University

 

North Carolina

North Carolina A&T State University

 

South Carolina

Allen University

Benedict College

Claflin University

Denmark Technical College

Morris College

South Carolina State University

Voorhees College

Charleston County School District

 

US Virgin Islands

University of the Virgin Islands

 

California

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

 

New Mexico

Sandia National Laboratory

 

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Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Summer Faculty Opportunities

ORNL is the largest science and energy laboratory in the Department of Energy system.  Scientific programs focus of materials, neutron sciences, energy, high-performance computing, systems biology and national security.  Visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSCdUJ8cavw to discover some exciting reasons why ORNL offers great research opportunities!

Opportunities listed by program

Visiting Faculty, Deadline 5:00 ET on Januar 9, 2015: http://science.energy.gov/wdts/vfp/ 

Higher Education Research Experience Faculty, Deadline February 1, 2015:  http://www.orau.org/ornl/faculty/default.htm#here

HBCU/MEI Faculty, Deadline 5:00pm ET on January 9, 2015: http://www.orau.org/ornl/faculty/hbcu-mei-summer-program.htm

For more information contact Julie Malicoat at (865) 576-2311 or Julie.Malicoat@orau.org

 

Two Stormwater Training Events at UDC

Rethinking Swale & Filter Strip Design

March 2, 2015 – 9am – 4pm

University of the District of Columbia (meeting room TBA) 4200 Connecticut Avenue, Washington, DC 20008 Workshop Website SPONSORED BY: University of the District of Columbia, Center for Sustainable Development College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSES) and NC State University Stormwater Engineering Group

CONTINUING EDUCATION: 6 Professional Development Hours are available for professional engineers and land surveyors. 6 CEUs are pending approval from the American Society of Landscape Architects.  5.25 credit hours are approved by the American Planning Association for AICP members.

DESCRIPTION: Swales and filter strips are an important, but often overlooked, part of stormwater management and Low Impact Development. Being simple to construct, however, does not translate into minimal benefits. Swales “out-punch their weight” with respect to removal of certain pollutants. Recent research has led to new design guidance for swales that allows engineers and other designers to customize swale design to specific water quality goals, while still conveying needed flows. By making relatively simple adjustments to swale cross-section, length and grass height, swales can be very effective. This workshop will review the most innovative designs for swales. Design for urban areas will be emphasized. Additionally, a new swale concept, the regenerative stormwater conveyance (RSC), which is a step pool conveyance system incorporating specially-designed media focused on nutrient removal, will be discussed. Recent research on these systems has shown potential hydrologic and water quality improvements.  As part of this workshop, attendees will need to bring a laptop, as a simple swale design model (SwaleMod) will be distributed and demonstrated. Please bring a PC laptop; this will not work on a Mac running Windows. REG FEE: $175 Early Bird; $225 Regular (includes lunch, refreshments and workshop materials)

For more information and to REGISTER ONLINE, please visit our website at:

http://www.bae.ncsu.edu/stormwater/training/swales.html

Innovative Rainwater Harvesting

March 3, 2015 – 8:30am – 5pm

University of the District of Columbia (meeting room TBA) 4200 Connecticut Avenue, Washington, DC 20008 Click here to visit the Workshop Website.  SPONSORED BY: University of the District of Columbia, Center for Sustainable Development College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSES) and NC State University Stormwater Engineering Group

CONTINUING EDUCATION: Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors earn 7 PDHs for the successful completion of the workshop. 7 CEUs are pending approval by the American Society of Landscape Architects. Planners and others may appeal to their respective board to obtain credit.

DESCRIPTION: Rainwater harvesting (RWH) systems are extremely useful practices for supplementing and replacing potable water resources; however, if designed appropriately, these systems can also be used to meet stormwater management goals. This workshop describes the different types of RWH systems and presents innovative design modifications for increasing the stormwater management benefits of these systems. These modifications include passive and active release mechanisms, excess irrigation and water usage adjustments. The NCSU Rainwater Harvester Model will be demonstrated and participants will learn how to use the new version of the model to design systems and estimate stormwater management benefits. REG FEE: $150 Early Bird; $200 Regular (includes lunch, refreshments and workshop materials) For more information and to REGISTER ONLINE, please go to: http://www.bae.ncsu.edu/stormwater/training/waterharvesting.html

Training Coordinators:  Cathy Smith / Chrissie Shepard NC State University Dept. of Biological & Agricultural Engineering  919-515-6780 / 919-513-2192

 

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Scholars Program

USDA

Office of Advocacy & Outreach (OAO) recently released its USDA 1890 National Scholars Program. The National Scholars Program is a major effort of the USDA and nineteen 1890 Historically Black Land-Grant Institutions (HBCUs) to award scholarships to students to attend one of the nineteen 1890 Institutions in any field of study in agriculture, food, natural resource sciences or other related disciplines.

The USDA/1890 National Scholars Program will provide full tuition, employment, employment benefits, fees, books, and room and board each year for up to 4 years to selected students pursuing a bachelor’s degree at the following universities:

  • Alabama A&M University
  • Alcorn State University
  • Central State University, Ohio
  • Delaware State University
  • Florida A&M University
  • Fort Valley State University, Georgia
  • Kentucky State University
  • Langston University, Oklahoma
  • Lincoln University, Missouri
  • North Carolina A&T State University
  • Prairie View A&M University, Texas
  • South Carolina State University
  • Southern University, Louisiana
  • Tennessee State University
  • Tuskegee University, Alabama
  • University of Arkansas Pine Bluff
  • University of Maryland Eastern Shore
  • Virginia State University
  • West Virginia State University

Eligible students must be U.S. citizens, have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, have been accepted at one of the 1890 HBCUs, study agriculture, food, natural resource sciences or other related academic disciplines, demonstrate leadership and community service, and etc. Please visit the USDA 1890 National Scholars Program website for more information.

Share this information with all high school students, parents of students, school guidance counselors, principals, teachers, and churches. The scholarship may be renewed each year contingent upon satisfactory academic performance and normal progress toward the bachelor’s degree. High school applications and college applications may be downloaded from the site below:

http://www.outreach.usda.gov/education/1890/

Application and supporting documentation DEADLINE: February 1, 2015

Press Release – Expanding Library Support for Faculty Research – Sub Grant Awards

PRESS RELEASE 
HBCU Library Alliance Awards Faculty Research Sub Grants to Recipients
Atlanta, GA – December 9, 2014 – The Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Library Alliance has selected eight institutions as recipients of sub grants as part of the Alliance’s larger effort to expand library support for faculty research. This grant funded-initiative, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, focuses on improving library services at individual HBCU campuses and developing collaborative approaches to expand HBCU community-wide library support for faculty research.

The sub grants have been awarded to libraries at HBCU institutions that have proposed or are in the midst of model projects that are developing or expanding research support services. These projects will help address an identified gap in HBCU library support for research among faculty and library deans/directors.

The eight HBCU recipients of these sub grants are:

  • Atlanta University Center Woodruff Library (Georgia)
  • Fisk University (Tennessee)
  • Jackson State University (Mississippi)
  • North Carolina A&T State University
  • Prairie View A&M State University (Texas)
  • Savannah State University (Georgia)
  • Shaw University (North Carolina)
  • Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge (Louisiana)

The sub grants were awarded based on criteria established by a nine member Faculty/Librarian Advisory Committee (FLAC), and included looking at the effectiveness of each library’s proposed plan in addressing an identified faculty need and the ability of the project to serve as a model for other HBCUs. Each sub grant recipient has four months to complete the project. Final performance and financial reports will be included in the project results documentation. In addition, each library grantee will be required to present a webinar in early 2015 to HBCU Library Alliance members to describe their project and its impact.

“We look forward to seeing the project results, and the subsequent impact they have on faculty research in these eight institutions and the greater HBCU community – whether it’s conducting ongoing literature reviews across a wide variety of sources, managing intellectual property rights and copyright, preserving access to data sets and publications through repositories, or forming partnerships to increase availability of resources,” states Cynthia L. Henderson, Executive Director of the Louis Stokes Health Sciences Library at Howard University and Chair of the HBCU Library Alliance Board of Directors.

“These sub grants extend the HBCU Library Alliance’s mission to strengthen member libraries through leadership development, archives preservation and strategic planning and assessment. This effort enables the implementation of innovative programs and increasing engagement with faculty in support for research, with the critical need to replicate effective programs on additional HBCU campuses,” says Sandra Phoenix, HBCU Library Alliance Executive Director.

For more information about the HBCU Library Alliance, please visit www.hbculibraries.org.

 

About the HBCU Library Alliance

The HBCU Library Alliance is a consortium that supports the collaboration of institutions dedicated to providing resources designed to strengthen the libraries and archives of Historically Black Colleges and Universities and their constituents. The purpose of the HBCU Alliance is to ensure excellence in HBCU Libraries and the development, coordination, and promotion of programs and activities to enhance member libraries.

For more infotmatoin please contact:

SANDRA M. PHOENIX
Executive Director
HBCU Library Alliance
sphoenix@hbculibraries.org
www.hbculibraries.org
800-999-8558, ext. 4820
404-702-5854

 

 

 

S&T Snapshot: Pre-solicitation Topics Announced for Nine Homeland Security Challenges Pre-solicitation

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) announced the release of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program FY15.1 Pre-Solicitation. The Pre-Solicitation, HSHQDC-15-R-00017, contains topic descriptions from both S&T and the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) for which Phase I proposals are sought. These include seven topics from S&T and two topics from DNDO.

Interested in learning more? Read the full S&T Snapshot story. Do you have any questions about the publication? Please e-mail st.snapshots@hq.dhs.gov

Summer Experiential Learning Fellowships in Disability Policy Research

Summer Experiential Learning Fellowships in Disability Policy Research The 2015 Summer Experiential Learning Fellowship program is an opportunity for graduate students in the social sciences and related disciplines to learn about the current state of the disability policy debate, pressing policy issues surrounding the employment of individuals with disabilities, and to conduct high-quality research in these areas. This opportunity is funded by a cooperative agreement between Mathematica and the Social Security Administration (SSA) via its Disability Research Consortium.

During their experience in summer 2015, fellows will:

  • Select a policy research topic on which to conduct an independent research project, and receive mentoring and guidance from a Mathematica researcher;
  • Write a research report summarizing their research by the end of the program and verbally present their findings to Mathematica and SSA staff;
  • Participate with other summer fellows in a weekly discussion group on selected disability policy readings, facilitated by a Mathematica researcher;
  • Meet with Mathematica researchers and SSA research and policy staff to discuss their research and other policy topics;
  • Have the opportunity to attend policy and research forums on a range of topics at Mathematica and in the DC area.

Fellows will receive a stipend of $6,500 for their efforts over the 8-week fellowship period. We expect to award up to four fellowships for summer 2015.

Program Eligibility

Eligible applicants include students who:

  • Are currently enrolled in or recently graduated (in the 6 months prior to the program start date) from a Master’s program, or are students early in a Ph.D. program (prior to the dissertation phase);
  • Have a strong interest in disability policy and a background in economics, sociology, psychology, political science, public policy, public administration, special education, public health, social work, or a related discipline;
  • Are available to be onsite at Mathematica Policy Research in Washington, DC for approximately 30 hours per week from June 1, 2015 through July 31, 2015;
  • At the time of fellowship award, selected graduate student researchers must be citizens or non-citizen nationals of the United States, or must have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence. Individuals on temporary or student visas are not eligible for stipend award.

Applications from minority students, students with a disability, and students attending a Minority Institutionare strongly encouraged!

Application Requirements and Selection Criteria

To apply, interested candidates should submit the following materials:

1. Resume with candidate’s contact information;

2. Graduate transcript (unofficial or official) from current program documentingpr ogress toward degree;

3. A letter from the candidate’s advisor or department chair confirming the pplicant’s field of study, status in the graduate program, and reason why the applicant is a strong fit for the fellowship;

4. 2-page (double-spaced) personal statement detailing (a) educational and professional background, (b) reason for interest in disability policy, (c) proposed research topic and (d) how the selected topic and/or ELF opportunity relates to graduate study or future research or professional portfolio. Candidates should be sure to use the personal statement to draw a strong link between their current program of study and proposed summer research project. This is especially important for applicants who are students in disciplines not mentioned in the eligibility criteria above; while other disciplines are not excluded from applying, there must be a strong case made for why this program would be a good fit in those instances.

Please carefully proofread this statement and ensure that each of the topics mentioned above is fully addressed. We do not expect candidates to have fully researched their topic prior to arrival. Rather, we suggest selecting a topic that is relevant to the candidate’s current graduate studies. Research topics should be closely related to programs under SSA’s purview and/or promoting employment for individuals with disabilities. For students who have not yet narrowed their dissertation topic, we suggest selecting from the following list, ensuring that the proposed topic is linked to your current studies. Determinants of adult employment success for youth with disabilities, potentially including strengths and weaknesses of the current support system and/or how socioeconomic factors affect outcomes. The potential role of the federal/state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program in reducing the reliance on federal disability benefits through early intervention andeturn-to-work supports.

The role of increasing obesity prevalence on rates of disability and predictions regarding future strains on the federal disability system. The effect of the Affordable Care Act (the ACA or “Obamacare”) reforms on the employment and well-being of individuals with disabilities. Including an Historically Black College or University (HBCU), Tribal College or University (TCU), Hispanic- Serving Institution (HSI), or Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander Institution (AANAPISI).

The role of program rules and work incentives in Social Security Disability Insurance and/or Supplemental Security Income on the return-to-work efforts of federal disability beneficiaries. Unique challenges faced by individuals with mental illness and psychiatric conditions in finding and maintaining employment, gaps in the support system, and promising practices for reform.

The United States’ support system for individuals with disabilities in an international context and reform proposals. Individuals with questions or seeking more information about the program should contact Jody Schimmel Hyde at JSchimmel@mathematica-mpr.com. Applications (with all supporting materials included as separate Microsoft Word or PDF files) should be ubmitted via email to DRCSummerFellows@mathematica-mpr.com. Complete applications must be received by

Friday, February 13, 2015 at midnight to be considered. A review committee will evaluate applications, and phone interviews will be conducted with finalists during mid-April. Selected fellows will be notified of their award no later than April 15, 2015.

Social Security Admistration Grant and Fellowship Programs for 2015!

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College announces the 2015 Sandell Grant Program and 2015 Dissertation Fellowship Program for research on retirement income and policy. These programs are funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration.

2015 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

  • Provides the opportunity for junior scholars entering a new field to pursue projects on retirement income and policy. The program is open to scholars in all academic disciplines.
  • Awards up to three grants of $45,000 for one-year projects.
  • The submission deadline for grant proposals is January 31, 2015. Grant award recipients will be announced by April 2015.
  • Visit the Sandell Program website to view the proposal guidelines.

2015 Dissertation Fellowship Program

  • Supports doctoral candidates writing dissertations on retirement income and policy. The program is open to scholars in all academic disciplines.
  • Awards up to three fellowships of $28,000.
  • The submission deadline for proposals is January 31, 2015. Grant award recipients will be announced by April 2015.
  • Visit the Dissertation Fellowship website to view the proposal guidelines.

For questions, please contact: Marina Tsiknis, tsiknis@bc.edu.617-552-1092

Center for Retirement Research at Boston College 258 Hammond Street, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (617) 552-1762 • fax: (617) 552-0191 • crr.bc.edu