FY 2015 Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad (SA) Program Announcement

COMPETITION ANNOUNCED!

CFDA Number: 84.018A

The SA Program supports short-term study and travel abroad for U.S. educators for the purpose of improving their understanding and knowledge of the peoples and cultures of other countries. The program is open to U.S. educators and administrators at the K-12 level.  For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 competition, we are offering a seminar to China, administered through a contractual agreement with the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations (NCUSCR).

The Fiscal Year 2015 Seminars application package will be available starting February 27, 2015 at www.g5.gov. The due date for submitting applications is April 1, 2015.  For additional program information, please go to: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/iegpssap/index.html

A Seminars Abroad Competition webinar will be offered Saturday, March 7, 12:00pm EST.

To register go to:

https://educate.webex.com/educate/j.php?RGID=r7786b20778828e93310ce7f85ed66494 

Once the host approves your request, you will receive a confirmation email with instructions in order to join the webinar on March 7th.

For audio, you must call in to the conference call line below. (PLEASE NOTE: Audio will not be provided if you just log onto the webinar using the information above).

Dial the Access Phone Number: 888-989-4712.

When prompted, dial the access code: 6256310.

If you have questions once the webinar begins please contact Carla.white@ed.gov.

For additional information on how to apply to the program, please go to:

http://www2.ed.gov/programs/iegpssap/index.html

White House Honors Historically Black Colleges and Universities “Champions of Change”

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of Communications

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 20, 2015

 

White House Honors Historically Black Colleges and Universities “Champions of Change”

WASHINGTON, DC – On February 24, the White House will recognize faculty and staff members at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) as “Champions of Change” who are finding success promoting college completion and success. These leaders have worked with students, families, and policymakers to build pathways to graduation at their respective institutions. The event will feature a panel discussion moderated by actor and E! News Co-Host, Terrence Jenkins, remarks from Senior Advisor to the President Valerie Jarrett and U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx.

The Champions of Change program was created as an opportunity for the White House to feature individuals doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities. The event is closed to press but will be live streamed on the White House website. To watch this event live, visit >www.whitehouse.gov/live< on February 24, at 10:00AM.  To learn more about the White House Champions of Change program, visit >www.whitehouse.gov/champions<. Follow the conversation at #HBCUchamps.

Deloris Alexander, Ph.D., Auburn Alabama

Deloris Alexander, Ph.D., serves as Director of the Integrative Biosciences PhD Program at Tuskegee University.  This program facilitates the progression of talented, motivated students from the collegiate through doctorate level to careers in the professorate and other areas.  A second-generation college graduate and the second person in her family to receive a PhD degree, Dr. Alexander is also a collaborator on several federally-funded projects involving graduate and undergraduate education, especially initiatives meant to increase access to education for socioeconomically-deprived students. She also leads programs designed to increase both diversity and America’s competitiveness in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields.

Abayomi Ajayi-Majebi, Ph.D., PE, Wilberforce, Ohio

Dr. Abayomi Ajayi-Majebi, serves as a Professor of Manufacturing Engineering and Past Chairman of the Manufacturing Engineering Department undergraduate program at Central State University (CSU). Over the past 30 years, he has supported hundreds of CSU Manufacturing Engineers, CSU STEM students, and CSU graduates, leading to their gainful employment in the U.S. and around the world.

Frank A. James, Little Rock, Arkansas

Frank James is a Professor of Mathematics at Philander Smith College a small Methodist institution located in Little Rock, Arkansas.  He was the Vice President for Academic Affairs at Philander Smith College from 2006-2013. He also serves as the Principal Investigator for a National Science Foundation (NSF) Implementation Grant [2012-2017]. He mentors students interested in becoming Engineers through a 3/2 joint MOU with the University of Arkansas and Philander Smith College.

Freddie T. Vaughns, Ph.D., Bowie, Maryland

Freddie T. Vaughns, Ph.D., currently serves as Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs for Bowie State University, one of the oldest historically black universities in the nation and the oldest in the state of Maryland. In his capacity he works with and advises the Provost on student concerns ranging from academic difficulties to retention and graduation efforts. Also, he is tenured faculty in the Child and Adolescent Studies program, preparing graduates to make significant contributions in the global community.

Gregory Goins, Ph.D., Greensboro, North Carolina

Dr. Goinsis an Associate Professor of Biology at North Carolina A&T State University where he organized the Integrative Biomathematical Learning and Empowerment Network for Diversity (iBLEND). The iBLEND initiative represents a partnership between faculty mentors from various science, mathematics, and engineering disciplines working together to retain undergraduates in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). In addition, iBLEND mentors help students prepare for future post-graduate opportunities and careers primarily at the interface between biology and mathematics. Since 2010, over 100 undergraduates from North Carolina A&T State University have completed research internships collaborating with iBLEND.

Herbert W. Thompson, Ph.D., Daytona Beach, Florida

Dr. Herbert W. Thompson is a tenured professor of Biology and Dean of the College of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics (CSEM) at Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Florida.  Under Dr. Thompson’s leadership, the CSEM, which is organized into five departments offering curricula for Baccalaureate Degrees, recently assessed each program to insure that graduates have the knowledge to solve real world problems.  A strong student advocate, Dr. Thompson continues to mentor students and faculty.  Over the years he has guided many to careers in medicine, STEM research and STEM education.  Prior to his appointment as Dean, he served as Chair of the Department of Biology and Project Director of the Health Careers Opportunity Program at Bethune-Cookman.

J.K. Haynes, Atlanta, Georgia

J.K. Haynes is the David Packard Professor of Science and Dean of Science and Mathematics at Morehouse College, in Atlanta, Georgia.  For over 36 years, he has served as a research scientist, professor and administrator at the College.  During this time, he has led numerous efforts to enrich the curriculum and to provide engaging extra-curricula experiences for STEM students as well as to increase the number of STEM graduates of the College.

Rennae Elliott, Ph.D., Huntsville, Alabama

Rennae Elliott, Ph.D., currently serves as the Chairperson and an Associate Professor of the Communication Department at Oakwood University in Huntsville, AL.   In addition to classroom teaching and academic advising, Dr. Elliott serves as coach of Oakwood’s Honda Campus All Star Challenge (HCASC) team, a post she’s held for over 17 years.  Influenced by her mentoring and advising, the team has won two championships and placed in the top four on five occasions. In 2014, HCASC named her Coach of the Year.  Dr. Elliott’s committee posts include the University’s Quality Enhancement Plan, Rank and Continuous Appointment, and the Dean’s Council.

Robert A. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D, Princess Anne, Maryland

Robert A. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D. serves as the Chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) in Princess Anne, Maryland. UMES is a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) and 1890 Land Grant Institution dedicated to providing educational programs for aspiring students. Dr. Johnson has centered his professional efforts on identifying, securing, and establishing resources that create awareness and stimulate interests in the vast opportunities that exist in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields. He and a team of faculty members have secured over $3,000,000 in federal, state, and industry funds to aid students in completing financial obligations related to collegiate study, gateway course completion, completing intense research projects, and matriculation to graduation. In addition, Dr. Johnson served, from 1999-2009, as the Director of the UMES Summer Transportation Institute, supported through funds provided from the U.S. Department of Transportation/Federal Highway Administration. The program assisted over 200 high school students in honing essential academic and social skills necessary for successful entry into collegiate environments and matriculation through STEM disciplines.

Tanya V. Rush, Baltimore, Maryland

Tanya V. Rush, serves as the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland. Representing the Vice President in various capacities and special projects, her primary responsibilities include oversight for the Division’s fiscal affairs and providing direct oversight to the directors of the University Health Center, Student Center/Student Activities, and the University Chapel.  Always willing to serve, Tanya volunteers her time with numerous university committees and worthwhile community activities. But her greatest joy is her service to students, undergraduate and graduate.  She is student-centered, dedicated to student development and success – academically, personally and professionally.

Tommie “Tonea” Stewart, Ph.D., Montgomery, Alabama

Dr. Tommie “Tonea” Stewart is a native of Greenwood, Mississippi and is a child of the civil rights movement. She is a professional actress; motivational speaker, theatre director, national museum exhibit director, tenured professor, and Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Alabama State University.  Dean Stewart is a graduate of Jackson State University (B.S.), the University of California at Santa Barbara (M.A.), and Florida State University with a Ph.D. in Theatre.  Stewart was the first African American female to receive a doctorate from the FSU school of Theatre and the first McKnight Doctoral Fellow in Theatre Arts. She is a New York World Festival Gold Medal Award winner for the narration of Public Radio International’s series “Remembering Slavery.”  She holds four honorary doctorates degrees and is a life member of the NAACP, Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority.

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NASA Student Opportunities – Deadlines are approaching

02/10 – 12/2015 – NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (OSSI) Online Career Week. 

Under the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships (NIFS), the first OSSI Online Career Week will take place on February 10 – 12, 2015. This is a virtual activity that will connect NASA Centers, STEM employers and top graduate programs with a highly qualified and diverse pool of prospective applicants from colleges and universities across the country. The Office of Education will coordinate and collaborate with the Office of Human Capital Management to leverage this activity.  The career week will include: NASA DAY (February 10), with participation from all NASA Centers; STEM INDUSTRY DAY (February 11), with participation from several STEM companies; and STEM Graduate Programs Fair (February 12), with participation from a total of up to 10 Predominantly Black Colleges, Predominantly White Institutions, and Hispanic Serving Institutions that offer STEM Graduate Programs.

POC: Carolyn Knowles, carolyn.knowles-1@nasa.gov.

One Stop Shopping Initiative (OSSI), NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships (NIFS)

NASA Internships are educational hands-on traineeships that provide unique NASA-related research and operational experiences for high school, undergraduate, and graduate students as well as educators. These internships integrate participants with career professionals emphasizing mentor-directed, degree-related, real-world task completion. During the internship participants engage in scientific or engineering research, development, and operations activities. In addition, there are non-technical internship opportunities to engage in professional activities which support NASA business and administrative processes. Through these internships, participants leverage NASA’s unique mission activities and mentorship to enhance and increase their professional capabilities and clarify their long-term career goals.

NASA Internships can be full or part-time, conducted at a NASA facility, contractor facility, or anywhere activities are ongoing to advance NASA’s missions. Mentors can be civil servants, contractors, or faculty conducting activities directly related to NASA’s unique assets and ongoing mission activities.

NASA internships occur within the following 4 sessions per year generally corresponding to the academic calendar: spring, summer, fall, and year-long (often following the academic year Aug.-May)

Summer internship applications are accepted: 11/10/2014 – 03/01/2015

For more information  Go to https://intern.nasa.gov.

NASA Office of Education Scholarship and Research Opportunities

Applications Deadline: March 31, 2015

NASA Office of Education (OE) provides funds for the NASA Scholarship and Research Opportunities (SRO), which awards scholarships to individuals who are pursuing degrees in undergraduate studies specifically in areas of projected deficiencies in the NASA Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) workforce. Students interested in applying to the NASA Scholarship and Research Opportunities may apply to either the Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) Scholarships, the Aeronautics Scholarships, or both scholarships, provided the student meets the eligibility criteria. The MUREP Scholarship awards scholarships for individuals pursuing or planning to pursue undergraduate studies leading to Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree in one or more relevant NASA related, STEM disciplines. Students must currently attend or plan to attend an accredited Minority Serving Institution (MSI) in the United States. The NASA Scholarship and Research Opportunities for Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarships (AUS) awards scholarships for individuals pursuing or planning to pursue undergraduate studies leading to Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree in areas related to aeronautics. These scholarships are directed toward enhancing the state of aeronautics for the nation, transforming the nation’s air transportation system, and developing the knowledge, tools, and technologies to support future air and space vehicles.

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the NASA Office of Education MUREP Advanced STEM Training and Research (ASTAR) Fellowships appendix. NASA Office of Education Fellowships support independently conceived or designed research, or senior design projects for graduate students in disciplines needed to help advance NASA’s missions. ASTAR fellowships provides awards for individuals, early in their graduate studies, pursuing or planning to pursue graduate studies leading to Masters and Doctoral degrees in relevant NASA-related disciplines at accredited U.S. universities. The fellowship award includes tuition offset, student stipend, and funding for an annual Center Based Research Experience (CBRE), resulting in an annual award of up to $50,000 for a student pursuing a Masters’ degree/ $55,000 for a student pursuing a Doctoral degree. Fellowships awards are made in the form of training grants to academic institutions and are for a duration of no more than three academic years. Proposals are due May 4, 2015.

For more information regarding ASTAR Fellowships, please visit the NASA EONS page on NSPIRES http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/

NASA EONS Solicitation- Student Fellowship Opportunity

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

Audience: Prospective and 1st year Graduate Student
Proposal Deadline: May 4, 2015

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the NASA Office of Education MUREP Advanced STEM Training and Research (ASTAR) Fellowships appendix. NASA Office of Education Fellowships support independently conceived or designed research, or senior design projects for graduate students in disciplines needed to help advance NASA’s missions. ASTAR fellowships provides awards for individuals, early in their graduate studies, pursuing or planning to pursue graduate studies leading to Masters and Doctoral degrees in relevant NASA-related disciplines at accredited U.S. universities. The fellowship award includes tuition offset, student stipend, and funding for an annual Center Based Research Experience (CBRE), resulting in an annual award of up to $50,000 for a student pursuing a Masters’ degree/ $55,000 for a student pursuing a Doctoral degree. Fellowships awards are made in the form of training grants to academic institutions and are for a duration of no more than three academic years. Proposals are due May 4, 2015.

For more information regarding ASTAR Fellowships, please visit the NASA EONS page on NSPIRES http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/

 

Release of Final Text of the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education – Cooperative Agreement Notice NNH15ZDA004C

On February 4, 2015, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is releasing a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) soliciting team-based proposals for SMD science education for community review and comment. The final text will be downloadable from the NSPIRES web page at https://nspires.nasaprs.com/ by selecting Solicitations and searching for NASA Science Education or NNH15ZDA004C.

The goal of NASA SMD Science Education is to enable NASA scientists and engineers into the learning environment more efficiently and effectively for learners of all ages.  This CAN is to meet the following NASA SMD Science Education Objectives: Enabling STEM education, improving U.S. science literacy; advancing National education goals; and leveraging science education through partnerships.  NASA intends to select one or more focused, science discipline-based team(s).  While it is envisioned that multiple agreements may be awarded, selection of a single award to support all of SMD science education requirements is not precluded.  Awards are anticipated by September 30, 2015.

Issuance of this CAN is dependent on programmatic factors, including NASA receiving an appropriation and operating plan containing adequate funding within the NASA budget. Any costs incurred by prospective investigators in preparing submissions in response to this CAN are incurred completely at the submitter’s own risk.

A virtual preproposal conference will be held on February 17, 2015, at 1:00 PM ET to provide interested parties with the opportunity to better understand the intent, scope, and selection criteria of this CAN. Information about the preproposal conference will be posted at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/.

Programmatic questions regarding this solicitation should be submitted no later than 15 days prior to the proposal due date by e-mail using the character string “Science Education CAN” (without quotes) included in the subject line of all transmissions. The identity of those submitting comments will be held in confidence. Answers to questions about this Announcement and Frequently Asked Questions from the draft CAN text are available on the website at https://nspires.nasaprs.com/.  Note that it is the responsibility of interested proposers to check for such information prior to the submission of their proposals.  Programmatic questions should be submitted to:

Kristen Erickson

E-mail: CANsci-ed@hq.nasa.gov

Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters

300 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20546

Anticipated NASA SMD Science Education CAN schedule:

CAN Release Date………………………………………………………………….. February 4, 2015

Preproposal Conference………………………………………………………….. February 17, 2015 (1:00 PM ET)

Notice of Intent to Propose Deadline…………………………………………. March 4, 2015

Electronic Proposal Submittal Deadline

at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time………………………………………………….….. May 4, 2015

Selections Announced (target)……………………………………………..….. Summer 2015

Projects Begin (target)………………………………………………………..……October 1, 2015

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Released Funding Opportunities

HHS office of Minority Heatlh has released a newletter with funding and grant opportunities for Minority Serving Institutions. Visit the link below to find more information on future solicitations that might be of interest to HBCUs.

 HHS Funding and Grant  Opportunities

FOR MORE INFORMATON ABOUT THE OFFICE OF MINORITY HEALTH VISIT

www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov

 

Innovation challenge to foster higher ed-affiliated service year positions

The Franklin Project at the Aspen Institute, the National Conference on Citizenship and the Corporation for National and Community Service announce the Service Year + Higher Ed Innovation Challenge. All post-secondary education institutions are invited to participate in the challenge running from January 15 to April 15, 2015. Each college or university entrant will compete for a prize to support the planning and creation of new education-affiliated service year positions. Lumina Foundation is supporting the prize. The challenge seeks to promote innovative ideas related to the integration of learning and service during the college experience. There will be three categories of entrants – public, private, and community colleges – with each category winner receiving $30,000. Additionally, an Audience Choice Award winner will receive a $10,000 prize.

More information about the challenge can be found at http://www.sychallenge.org/about-the-challenge/.

Eligibility and Applications

To be eligible for the challenge, institutions must design a service year program that will result in academic credit, meet Service Year exchange certification criteria, be designed for sustainability, have the support of the institution’s leadership, and provide a model for other similar post-secondary institutions. Applications can be submitted online starting January 15 through March 6 at http://www.sychallenge.org/apply/.

Finalists and Judges

Finalists will be announced on March 13. Finalists will be invited to present their program concepts in person to a panel of judges, including potential funders, during an all-day event on April 15 at the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC. Esteemed leaders participating as judges for the Challenge include Holly Zanville, Strategy Director at Lumina Foundation; Maureen Curley, former President of Campus Compact; Harris Wofford, formerly US Senator, Special Assistant to President Kennedy, and the CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service under President Clinton; Alan Khazei, Co-Founder of City Year, Founder & CEO of Be the Change, and Co-Chair, Franklin Project at The Aspen Institute; Bill Basl, Director of AmeriCorps; and Lattie Coor, Chairman and CEO of the Center for the Future of Arizona, and Former President of Arizona State University and University of Vermont.

The Challenge will be hosted by John Bridgeland, former Director, White House Domestic Policy Council under President George W. Bush, Member, White House Council for Community Solutions under President Obama, and Co-Chair, Franklin Project at The Aspen Institute; and Shirley Sagawa, Chief Service Officer of the National Conference on Citizenship and former Deputy Chief of Staff for First Lady Hillary Clinton. Media will also be invited to attend the event.

“Today, we are challenging the nation’s colleges and universities to innovate around the idea that a service year, aligned with programs of study, should become part of what it means to be educated in America,” said Jamie Merisotis, president & CEO of Lumina Foundation. “All learning should count — including a service year — toward a high-quality postsecondary credential with value in the workplace. Our hope is that this prize will unleash innovative models in higher education across our nation.”

“Service and higher education go hand in hand,” said Wendy Spencer, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “Many institutions of higher learning are enlisting AmeriCorps to provide service opportunities that help their students serve with community leaders to solve local problems. We are proud to support this new public-private partnership that will encourage additional service-focused initiatives at colleges and universities.”

John Bridgeland, co-chair of the Franklin Project at the Aspen Institute, said, “With leadership and support from Lumina Foundation, innovative colleges and universities will be able to harness the energy of this generation of students to serve. The integration of a service year into institutions of higher learning will prepare future leaders to get big things done for our country.”

“As preeminent civic leaders, the higher ed community influences how young people engage in communities today and throughout their lives. We are honored to work with these leaders to help make service years widespread and deeply impacting,” said Ilir Zherka, Executive Director of the National Conference on Citizenship.

Application materials and more information on the challenge can be found on the website here: http://www.sychallenge.org/

Portions of the April 15 event will be live streamed on the Aspen Institute website. Event updates will be featured at www.twitter.com/aspeninstitute and www.twitter.com/franklinproj. A limited number of press passes are available.

About the Challenge Partners

Lumina Foundation is an independent, private foundation committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025. Lumina’s outcomes-based approach focuses on helping to design and build an accessible, responsive and accountable higher education system while fostering a national sense of urgency for action to achieve Goal 2025.

National Conference on Citizenship is a congressionally chartered organization dedicated to strengthening civic life in America. We pursue our mission through a cutting-edge civic health initiative, an innovative national service project, and cross-sector conferences. At the core of our belief is that every person has the ability to help their community and country thrive.

The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) is a federal agency that engages more than five million Americans in service through its AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, Social Innovation Fund, and Volunteer Generation Fund programs, and leads the President’s national call to service initiative, United We Serve. For more information, visit NationalService.gov. CNCS also administers the Presidents Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest honor a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement.

The Franklin Project is a new venture by the Aspen Institute to marshal the best case for a voluntary civilian counterpart to military service in the United States. At the 2012 Aspen Ideas Festival, General Stanley McChrystal called for large-scale civilian national service to engage more Americans in serving community and country. The Franklin Project believes national service can and should become a common expectation and common opportunity for all Americans to strengthen our social fabric and solve our most pressing national challenges. To realize this vision, the Franklin Project engages outstanding Americans from the private sector, higher education, government, the military, the faith community, the philanthropy, and nonprofit organizations, to develop innovative policy ideas and to build momentum around advancing a new vision of civilian service for the 21st century.

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. Its mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and to provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues. The Institute is based in Washington, DC; Aspen, Colorado; and on the Wye River on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. It also has offices in New York City and an international network of partners. For more information, visit www.aspeninstitute.org

America’s College Promise and HBCUs

America’s College Promise and HBCUs

Ivory A. Toldson

Recently, President Obama unveiled a proposal to offer free community college tuition for all Americans who maintain a 2.5 GPA, and make steady progress toward completing their program.  Today, community colleges educate more African American undergraduate students than any other higher education provider. So, this policy can lead to significant increases in the number of students who transfer to four-year Historically Black Colleges and Universities, or HBCUs, including many students who had not been accepted for first-time admission to a four-year college.

Currently, twelve of the 100 Title IV participating HBCUs are community colleges and would benefit directly from President Obama’s America’s College Promise proposal.  These colleges are: Bishop State Community College (AL); Gadsden State Community College (AL); H Councill Trenholm State Technical College (AL); Hinds Community College (MS); J F Drake State Community and Technical College (AL); Lawson State Community College-Birmingham Campus (AL); Shelton State Community College (AL); Southern University at Shreveport (LA); Coahoma Community College (MS); Denmark Technical College (SC); St Philip’s College (TX); and Shorter College (AR).

However, four-year HBCUs have as much to gain from the America’s College Promise as community colleges.  Today, community colleges educate a large number of students who could not otherwise gain admissions to four-year HBCUs due to new, tougher admissions criteria at many colleges and universities.  Over the last ten years, state laws or board policies have restricted admissions at traditional four-year colleges, including state HBCUs, based on the premise that less academically prepared students should start their postsecondary experience at a community college.  These changes range from setting a minimum ACT or SAT requirement for public universities, to prohibiting public four-year colleges from offering remedial classes.  According to The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, 65 of the 100 HBCUs that qualify for Federal Student Financial Aid have selective admissions, while the remaining 34 campuses have open admissions. Only 4 of the 34 open admissions HBCUs are 4-year public institutions.

The America’s College Promise proposal can supplement the changes already occurring at four-year HBCUs by covering the cost of tuition during the years that students are receiving remedial developmental education.  In addition, the proposal would require states to maintain or increase existing higher education investments, as a condition of participating in this historic federal program.  This means the Administration’s proposal would both supplement state higher education budgets and safeguard state HBCUs from budget cuts.

Finally, the America’s College Promise proposal can inspire more articulation agreements between HBCUs and community colleges, and possibly expand out-of-state enrollment at HBCUs.  Twenty U.S. states and one U.S. territory are home to HBCUs.  However, even states with no HBCUs recognize the potential of these unique and distinguished institutions to provide support to Black community college transfer students.  For example, the California Community Colleges system has taken a historic step towards advancing transfer partnerships with HBCUs though a memorandum of understanding, which will be ceremonially signed by selected HBCU presidents at the California Community Colleges Board of Governors meeting in Sacramento.

In short, the America’s College Promise proposal would help to complement and strengthen the efforts of America’s HBCUs, by: providing direct support to the 12 percent of HBCUs that are community colleges; mitigating selective admissions requirements by providing free developmental support to students that four-year HBCUs may have initially been required to reject; and supporting and expanding articulation agreements between HBCUs and community colleges across the nation.

America’s College Promise is a win-win for community colleges and HBCUs — and for the nation’s students.

 

Ivory A. Toldson, Ph.D., was appointed by President Barack Obama to be the deputy director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. He is currently on leave from his position as associate professor at Howard University. He is also contributing educational editor for The Root. Follow him on twitter @toldson.

TMCF Webinar: Acing the Application Process

Learn about internship opportunities with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and how to ace the application process.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

5:30pm-6:30pm EST

To register for the webinar, please e-mail: OMWI@sec.gov- indicating TMCF 2/5 webinar in the subject line. You will be provided confirmation in addition to a call-in number and link to the session