How HBCUs Can Get Federal Sponsorship from the United States Department of Justice

By: Ivory A. Toldson & Amanda Washington

Over more than 150 years, HBCUs have provided students with the tools to meet the challenges of a changing world.  These institutions are hubs of opportunity that lift up Americans and instill in their students a sense of who they are and what they can become.  Their campuses are engines of economic growth and community service and proven ladders of intergenerational advancement. – President Barack Obama, 2014 Proclamation

Highlights

  • Office of Justice Programs (OJP) typically makes more than 3,500 grant awards to criminal and juvenile justice organizations and victim service providers at the national, state, local, and tribal level, totaling more than $2 billion.
  • The FY 2016 Federal budget requests $154 million in additional funding for DOJ grant programs (Office of Justice Programs, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, and Office on Violence Against Women), for a total grant program request of $2.7 billion.
  • In 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice awarded $40,019,662 to Institutions of Higher Education with $822,596 of the grant funding specifically awarded to HBCUs.
  • In 2014, eleven HBCUs applied to receive grant funding through Office of Justice Programs.
  • In 2014, less than 10 percent of HBCUs applied for any funding from the DOJ and less than 3 percent received funding.

Introduction

Recent high profile interactions between the Black community and law enforcement officials underscore the need for criminal justice research, programs and advocacy at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) awards over $40 million to institutes of higher education, but HBCUs receive only a small percentage of this revenue. The reasons for HBCUs receiving less money are complex. Many contend that HBCUs are smaller institutions with less university personnel to deliver high quality proposals, while others identify systemic biases that may influence raters’ judgments of HBCU’s proposals.

Despite the challenges, some HBCUs have produced successful proposals to the DOJ. As an assistant professor at Southern University A & M in Baton Rouge, Dr. Ivory A. Toldson, the co-author of this article, received a grant from DOJ to study police misconduct. More recently, Howard University, Lincoln University and Elizabeth City State University received grants to address sexual violence. The purpose of this article is to provide information relevant to HBCUs who are interested in securing federal sponsorship for their research and programs through the DOJ.

This series is designed to expand Federal support of HBCU research, programs, and outreach through competitive grants and contracts. HBCUs receive approximately $287 million per year for research and development from 32 federal agencies. However, this is only a fraction of the more than $25 billion awarded to all institutions of higher education. The White House Initiative on HBCUs (WHIHBCUs) believes that increasing revenues to HBCUs from federal grants and contracts is vital to the long term sustainability of our institutions. By developing innovative proposals, working with HBCU liaisons at federal agencies and taking advantage of federal funding opportunities, HBCUs can increase the resources necessary to initiate and sustain vital programs.

The U.S. Department of Justice Overview

The U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP) provides innovative leadership to federal, state, local, and tribal justice systems, by disseminating state-of-the art knowledge and practices across America, and providing grants for the implementation of these crime fighting strategies.  For FY 2016, President Obama requested $28.7 billion for the DOJ; an increase of approximately $2.5 billion over the previous year. The DOJ’s FY 2016 request includes 118,001 positions including 26,274 Agents, 12,519 Attorneys, 20,921 Correctional Officers, and 4,613 Intelligence Analysts. The FY 2016 budget also request $154 million in additional funding for DOJ grant programs (Office of Justice Programs, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, and Office on Violence Against Women), for a total grant program request of $2.7 billion.

Specifically, FY 2016 request:

  • For OJP totals $2.7 billion, including $1.6 billion for discretionary grant programs and $1.1 billion for mandatory grant programs. It includes $427.1 million in discretionary enhancements, including increased funding for an indigent defense initiative, Second Chance Prisoner Reentry, Justice Reinvestment, and juvenile justice programs.
  • For Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) totals $303.5 million. The COPS request includes $249.5 million for the COPS Hiring Program, with $5.0 million targeted towards increasing diversity in law enforcement, and $35.0 million for Tribal Law Enforcement.
  • For the Office of Violence Against Women (OVW) totals $473.5 million. OVW’s budget includes a total of $50 million in enhancements. Protecting students from sexual assault is a top priority for this Administration, and the Budget includes a $14 million increase to the Campus Violence Program to better meet the need on college campuses.

White House Initiative on HBCUs’ Liaison to the U.S. Department of Justice

As the liaison between the White House Initiative on HBCUs (WHIHBCUs) and OJP, Kevin Jenkins (kevin.jenkins@usdoj.gov) works with the WHIHBCUs to organize efforts to strengthen the capacity of HBCUs through increased participation in appropriate Federal programs and initiatives.

Specifically, Mr. Jenkins helps the WHIHBCUs to:

  1. Establish how the department or agency intends to increase the capacity of HBCUs to compete effectively for grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements and to encourage HBCUs to participate in Federal programs;
  2. Identify Federal programs and initiatives in which HBCUs may be either underserved or underused as national resources, and improve HBCUs’ participation therein; and
  3. Encourage public-sector, private-sector, and community involvement in improving the overall capacity of HBCUs.

Kevin Jenkins serves as the Intergovernmental Affairs Specialist at the Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. He has been with the Department since March 2008 and has spent his entire professional career in public service working for non-profit organizations, as well as local, state, and federal government agencies, focusing on issues such as mental health, homelessness, transportation, community planning, and advocating for developmentally disabled persons in the criminal justice system.

What opportunities are there for HBCUs to compete for grants/contracts through the agency?

In fiscal year 2011, OJP made more than 3,500 grant awards to criminal and juvenile justice organizations and victim service providers at the national, state, local, and tribal level. These awards include a total of more than $2 billion to support public safety and justice initiatives in every part of the United States[i]. This federal agency offers several grant opportunities for Institutions of Higher Education to implement and strengthen innovative programs. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice awarded $40,019,662 to Institutions of Higher Education with $822,596 of the grant funding specifically awarded to HBCUs.

Several bureaus and offices within the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs provide funding and award opportunities to Institutions of Higher Education. In the year 2014, ten HBCUs applied to receive grant funding through the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), and the Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking (SMART).

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) provides the most amount of money to higher education and provides significant funding and award opportunities to HBCUs. The NIJ funds physical and social science research, development and evaluation projects about criminal justice through competitive solicitations. The focus of the solicitations varies from year to year based on research priorities and available funding[ii]. In 2014, Texas Southern University, Claflin University, Alabama State University, Bowie State University, Howard University and Clark Atlanta University applied for grants within the NIJ.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) also provides discretionary funding to organizations to implement various programs including strategic enhancement to mentoring, community initiatives to increase child safety, and programs that discourage youth gang membership. In 2014, Clark Atlanta University, Hampton University, Florida Memorial University, Alabama State University, and Dillard University applied for grants within the OJJDP.

The Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking (SMART) provide jurisdictions with guidance regarding the implementation of the Adam Walsh Act, and provide technical assistance to the states, territories, Indian tribes, local governments, and to public and private organizations. The SMART Office also tracks important legislative and legal developments related to sex offenders and administers grant programs related to the registration, notification, and management of sex offenders. In 2014, Johnson C. Smith University applied for a grant with SMART.

In recent years, how successful have HBCUs been in obtaining grants/contracts from DOJ?

According to Mr. Jenkins, many HBCUs have expressed that they are unaware of the resources at the U.S. Department of Justice, and only a small percentage of HBCUs have applied for funding. Recently, Howard University, Lincoln University and Elizabeth City State University received grants to address sexual violence, with total awards ranging from $300,000 to $35,000 through the Office on Violence Against Women.

What advice does DOJ give to HBCUs in order to be more competitive in obtaining grants and contracts?

  1. Get involved. OJP is always seeking qualified individuals to join the pool of subject matter experts they call upon to review the strengths and weaknesses of applications for grant funding. More HBCU scholars should join the pool. If you are interested, start the enrollment process by e-mailing ojppeerreview@lmbps.com.
  2. Make connections. Contact the program officer in charge of a request for proposals before starting the application. Find out about administration priorities and application imperatives. If you have difficulties identifying the program officer, contact the HBCU liaison or Ivory A. Toldson (toldson@ed.gov), the Deputy Director of WHIHBCUs.
  3. Start early. Institutions should apply for grant funding early while also striving for the proposal to be collaborative, evidence-based, measured, and comprehensive. Build in an initial rejection and revision into the expected time between starting the application and getting funded.
  4. Collaborate. The U.S. Department of Justice urges Institutions of Higher Education to apply for grants as the primary fiscal agent while also identifying partnerships with local and national agencies, regional organizations and a variety of relevant affiliates.
  5. Ground your proposal in research. In addition, successful grant proposals provide in-depth scholarly work and consist of concrete action plans.
  6. If at first you don’t succeed, try again. If your institution is denied grant funding, it is important to follow up with the Office of Justice Programs to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the proposal. The agency suggests that denied applicants utilize this feedback to revise grant proposals and reapply in the next application season.

Conclusions

The process of obtaining a grant from the Federal Government can be daunting, but there’s only one way to guarantee that a proposal will not be funding – not to apply. Currently, the DOJ funds HBCUs at a level that is less than the average for all Federal agencies. However, this is partially attributed to the low numbers of HBCUs, which have applied. Nationally, 6 HBCUs have law schools, most have criminal justice programs and all offer classes that are relevant to law and justice. In addition, HBCUs have students and faculty members should take leadership in shaping justice-relevant research, policy and practice. In partnership, government officials and HBCUs can expand support to HBCUs through the DOJ.

Specially, the WHIHBCUs should regularly produce reports such as this, which has information regarding the agency’s HBCU liaison, background facts, funding trends, existing HBCU relationships, and agency emphasis. The WHIHBCUs should also work with Federal partners to provide technical assistance to HBCUs who are interested in applying for funding.

HBCUs should work with the President’s Board of Directors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities and the WHIHBCUs to identify institutional strengths and establish partnerships with federal agencies. HBCUs should also build their institutional capacity to produce competitive grants. Members of Congress can help HBCUs to network with key personnel at federal agencies. Members can also help HBCUs connect with corporate and philanthropic partners to strength collaborative efforts.

Links/Resources to Opportunities

[i] http://ojp.gov/grants101/index.htm

[ii] http://ojp.gov/partnerships/partnerships.htm

 

Ivory A. Toldson, Ph.D., was appointed by President Barack Obama to be the deputy director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. He is currently on leave from his position as associate professor at Howard University.

Amanda Washington is an M.A. degree student in Education Policy at the EPSA department at Teacher College Columbia University. She graduated from Spelman College.

NASA Astrobiology Minority Institution Research Support (MIRS) Program – Deadline March 16

NASA Astrobiology Minority Institution Research Support (MIRS) Program

The goal of the MIRS Program is to help train a new generation of researchers in astrobiology and to increase diversity within the astrobiology community. Over the past ten years, the program has provided opportunities for faculty members and students from minority-serving institutions to partner with astrobiology investigators.

One of the program’s main objectives is to engage more faculty from under-represented schools in astrobiology research and increase the number of students pursuing careers in astrobiology.

Please contact Melissa Kirven-Brooks, Melissa.kirven@nasa.gov for more information.

2015 MIRS ApplicationThe application deadline is: March 16, 2015

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) seeking interns

GSFC will be accepting applications between March 9, 2015 and March 16, 2015 for our Fall 2015 Pathways IEP opportunities.

You can search and apply for NASA federal opportunities on

http://nasajobs.nasa.gov/. For the specific IEP jobs see below:

NASA’s Office of Education sponsors seasonal opportunities including internships, fellowships and scholarships.

If you are interested in non- federal service student research-based science, technology, egineering and math (STEM) opportunities apply directly at:

https://intern.nasa.gov/non-us-opportunities/index.html

FY 2015 Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad (SA) Program Announcement

COMPETITION ANNOUNCED!

CFDA Number: 84.018A

The SA Program supports short-term study and travel abroad for U.S. educators for the purpose of improving their understanding and knowledge of the peoples and cultures of other countries. The program is open to U.S. educators and administrators at the K-12 level.  For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 competition, we are offering a seminar to China, administered through a contractual agreement with the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations (NCUSCR).

The Fiscal Year 2015 Seminars application package will be available starting February 27, 2015 at www.g5.gov. The due date for submitting applications is April 1, 2015.  For additional program information, please go to: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/iegpssap/index.html

A Seminars Abroad Competition webinar will be offered Saturday, March 7, 12:00pm EST.

To register go to:

https://educate.webex.com/educate/j.php?RGID=r7786b20778828e93310ce7f85ed66494 

Once the host approves your request, you will receive a confirmation email with instructions in order to join the webinar on March 7th.

For audio, you must call in to the conference call line below. (PLEASE NOTE: Audio will not be provided if you just log onto the webinar using the information above).

Dial the Access Phone Number: 888-989-4712.

When prompted, dial the access code: 6256310.

If you have questions once the webinar begins please contact Carla.white@ed.gov.

For additional information on how to apply to the program, please go to:

http://www2.ed.gov/programs/iegpssap/index.html

NASA Student Opportunities – Deadlines are approaching

02/10 – 12/2015 – NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (OSSI) Online Career Week. 

Under the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships (NIFS), the first OSSI Online Career Week will take place on February 10 – 12, 2015. This is a virtual activity that will connect NASA Centers, STEM employers and top graduate programs with a highly qualified and diverse pool of prospective applicants from colleges and universities across the country. The Office of Education will coordinate and collaborate with the Office of Human Capital Management to leverage this activity.  The career week will include: NASA DAY (February 10), with participation from all NASA Centers; STEM INDUSTRY DAY (February 11), with participation from several STEM companies; and STEM Graduate Programs Fair (February 12), with participation from a total of up to 10 Predominantly Black Colleges, Predominantly White Institutions, and Hispanic Serving Institutions that offer STEM Graduate Programs.

POC: Carolyn Knowles, carolyn.knowles-1@nasa.gov.

One Stop Shopping Initiative (OSSI), NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships (NIFS)

NASA Internships are educational hands-on traineeships that provide unique NASA-related research and operational experiences for high school, undergraduate, and graduate students as well as educators. These internships integrate participants with career professionals emphasizing mentor-directed, degree-related, real-world task completion. During the internship participants engage in scientific or engineering research, development, and operations activities. In addition, there are non-technical internship opportunities to engage in professional activities which support NASA business and administrative processes. Through these internships, participants leverage NASA’s unique mission activities and mentorship to enhance and increase their professional capabilities and clarify their long-term career goals.

NASA Internships can be full or part-time, conducted at a NASA facility, contractor facility, or anywhere activities are ongoing to advance NASA’s missions. Mentors can be civil servants, contractors, or faculty conducting activities directly related to NASA’s unique assets and ongoing mission activities.

NASA internships occur within the following 4 sessions per year generally corresponding to the academic calendar: spring, summer, fall, and year-long (often following the academic year Aug.-May)

Summer internship applications are accepted: 11/10/2014 – 03/01/2015

For more information  Go to https://intern.nasa.gov.

NASA Office of Education Scholarship and Research Opportunities

Applications Deadline: March 31, 2015

NASA Office of Education (OE) provides funds for the NASA Scholarship and Research Opportunities (SRO), which awards scholarships to individuals who are pursuing degrees in undergraduate studies specifically in areas of projected deficiencies in the NASA Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) workforce. Students interested in applying to the NASA Scholarship and Research Opportunities may apply to either the Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) Scholarships, the Aeronautics Scholarships, or both scholarships, provided the student meets the eligibility criteria. The MUREP Scholarship awards scholarships for individuals pursuing or planning to pursue undergraduate studies leading to Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree in one or more relevant NASA related, STEM disciplines. Students must currently attend or plan to attend an accredited Minority Serving Institution (MSI) in the United States. The NASA Scholarship and Research Opportunities for Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarships (AUS) awards scholarships for individuals pursuing or planning to pursue undergraduate studies leading to Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree in areas related to aeronautics. These scholarships are directed toward enhancing the state of aeronautics for the nation, transforming the nation’s air transportation system, and developing the knowledge, tools, and technologies to support future air and space vehicles.

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the NASA Office of Education MUREP Advanced STEM Training and Research (ASTAR) Fellowships appendix. NASA Office of Education Fellowships support independently conceived or designed research, or senior design projects for graduate students in disciplines needed to help advance NASA’s missions. ASTAR fellowships provides awards for individuals, early in their graduate studies, pursuing or planning to pursue graduate studies leading to Masters and Doctoral degrees in relevant NASA-related disciplines at accredited U.S. universities. The fellowship award includes tuition offset, student stipend, and funding for an annual Center Based Research Experience (CBRE), resulting in an annual award of up to $50,000 for a student pursuing a Masters’ degree/ $55,000 for a student pursuing a Doctoral degree. Fellowships awards are made in the form of training grants to academic institutions and are for a duration of no more than three academic years. Proposals are due May 4, 2015.

For more information regarding ASTAR Fellowships, please visit the NASA EONS page on NSPIRES http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/

NASA EONS Solicitation- Student Fellowship Opportunity

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

Audience: Prospective and 1st year Graduate Student
Proposal Deadline: May 4, 2015

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the NASA Office of Education MUREP Advanced STEM Training and Research (ASTAR) Fellowships appendix. NASA Office of Education Fellowships support independently conceived or designed research, or senior design projects for graduate students in disciplines needed to help advance NASA’s missions. ASTAR fellowships provides awards for individuals, early in their graduate studies, pursuing or planning to pursue graduate studies leading to Masters and Doctoral degrees in relevant NASA-related disciplines at accredited U.S. universities. The fellowship award includes tuition offset, student stipend, and funding for an annual Center Based Research Experience (CBRE), resulting in an annual award of up to $50,000 for a student pursuing a Masters’ degree/ $55,000 for a student pursuing a Doctoral degree. Fellowships awards are made in the form of training grants to academic institutions and are for a duration of no more than three academic years. Proposals are due May 4, 2015.

For more information regarding ASTAR Fellowships, please visit the NASA EONS page on NSPIRES http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/

 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Released Funding Opportunities

HHS office of Minority Heatlh has released a newletter with funding and grant opportunities for Minority Serving Institutions. Visit the link below to find more information on future solicitations that might be of interest to HBCUs.

 HHS Funding and Grant  Opportunities

FOR MORE INFORMATON ABOUT THE OFFICE OF MINORITY HEALTH VISIT

www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov

 

Innovation challenge to foster higher ed-affiliated service year positions

The Franklin Project at the Aspen Institute, the National Conference on Citizenship and the Corporation for National and Community Service announce the Service Year + Higher Ed Innovation Challenge. All post-secondary education institutions are invited to participate in the challenge running from January 15 to April 15, 2015. Each college or university entrant will compete for a prize to support the planning and creation of new education-affiliated service year positions. Lumina Foundation is supporting the prize. The challenge seeks to promote innovative ideas related to the integration of learning and service during the college experience. There will be three categories of entrants – public, private, and community colleges – with each category winner receiving $30,000. Additionally, an Audience Choice Award winner will receive a $10,000 prize.

More information about the challenge can be found at http://www.sychallenge.org/about-the-challenge/.

Eligibility and Applications

To be eligible for the challenge, institutions must design a service year program that will result in academic credit, meet Service Year exchange certification criteria, be designed for sustainability, have the support of the institution’s leadership, and provide a model for other similar post-secondary institutions. Applications can be submitted online starting January 15 through March 6 at http://www.sychallenge.org/apply/.

Finalists and Judges

Finalists will be announced on March 13. Finalists will be invited to present their program concepts in person to a panel of judges, including potential funders, during an all-day event on April 15 at the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC. Esteemed leaders participating as judges for the Challenge include Holly Zanville, Strategy Director at Lumina Foundation; Maureen Curley, former President of Campus Compact; Harris Wofford, formerly US Senator, Special Assistant to President Kennedy, and the CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service under President Clinton; Alan Khazei, Co-Founder of City Year, Founder & CEO of Be the Change, and Co-Chair, Franklin Project at The Aspen Institute; Bill Basl, Director of AmeriCorps; and Lattie Coor, Chairman and CEO of the Center for the Future of Arizona, and Former President of Arizona State University and University of Vermont.

The Challenge will be hosted by John Bridgeland, former Director, White House Domestic Policy Council under President George W. Bush, Member, White House Council for Community Solutions under President Obama, and Co-Chair, Franklin Project at The Aspen Institute; and Shirley Sagawa, Chief Service Officer of the National Conference on Citizenship and former Deputy Chief of Staff for First Lady Hillary Clinton. Media will also be invited to attend the event.

“Today, we are challenging the nation’s colleges and universities to innovate around the idea that a service year, aligned with programs of study, should become part of what it means to be educated in America,” said Jamie Merisotis, president & CEO of Lumina Foundation. “All learning should count — including a service year — toward a high-quality postsecondary credential with value in the workplace. Our hope is that this prize will unleash innovative models in higher education across our nation.”

“Service and higher education go hand in hand,” said Wendy Spencer, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “Many institutions of higher learning are enlisting AmeriCorps to provide service opportunities that help their students serve with community leaders to solve local problems. We are proud to support this new public-private partnership that will encourage additional service-focused initiatives at colleges and universities.”

John Bridgeland, co-chair of the Franklin Project at the Aspen Institute, said, “With leadership and support from Lumina Foundation, innovative colleges and universities will be able to harness the energy of this generation of students to serve. The integration of a service year into institutions of higher learning will prepare future leaders to get big things done for our country.”

“As preeminent civic leaders, the higher ed community influences how young people engage in communities today and throughout their lives. We are honored to work with these leaders to help make service years widespread and deeply impacting,” said Ilir Zherka, Executive Director of the National Conference on Citizenship.

Application materials and more information on the challenge can be found on the website here: http://www.sychallenge.org/

Portions of the April 15 event will be live streamed on the Aspen Institute website. Event updates will be featured at www.twitter.com/aspeninstitute and www.twitter.com/franklinproj. A limited number of press passes are available.

About the Challenge Partners

Lumina Foundation is an independent, private foundation committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025. Lumina’s outcomes-based approach focuses on helping to design and build an accessible, responsive and accountable higher education system while fostering a national sense of urgency for action to achieve Goal 2025.

National Conference on Citizenship is a congressionally chartered organization dedicated to strengthening civic life in America. We pursue our mission through a cutting-edge civic health initiative, an innovative national service project, and cross-sector conferences. At the core of our belief is that every person has the ability to help their community and country thrive.

The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) is a federal agency that engages more than five million Americans in service through its AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, Social Innovation Fund, and Volunteer Generation Fund programs, and leads the President’s national call to service initiative, United We Serve. For more information, visit NationalService.gov. CNCS also administers the Presidents Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest honor a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement.

The Franklin Project is a new venture by the Aspen Institute to marshal the best case for a voluntary civilian counterpart to military service in the United States. At the 2012 Aspen Ideas Festival, General Stanley McChrystal called for large-scale civilian national service to engage more Americans in serving community and country. The Franklin Project believes national service can and should become a common expectation and common opportunity for all Americans to strengthen our social fabric and solve our most pressing national challenges. To realize this vision, the Franklin Project engages outstanding Americans from the private sector, higher education, government, the military, the faith community, the philanthropy, and nonprofit organizations, to develop innovative policy ideas and to build momentum around advancing a new vision of civilian service for the 21st century.

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. Its mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and to provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues. The Institute is based in Washington, DC; Aspen, Colorado; and on the Wye River on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. It also has offices in New York City and an international network of partners. For more information, visit www.aspeninstitute.org

TMCF Webinar: Acing the Application Process

Learn about internship opportunities with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and how to ace the application process.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

5:30pm-6:30pm EST

To register for the webinar, please e-mail: OMWI@sec.gov- indicating TMCF 2/5 webinar in the subject line. You will be provided confirmation in addition to a call-in number and link to the session

U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Scholars Program

USDA

Office of Advocacy & Outreach (OAO) recently released its USDA 1890 National Scholars Program. The National Scholars Program is a major effort of the USDA and nineteen 1890 Historically Black Land-Grant Institutions (HBCUs) to award scholarships to students to attend one of the nineteen 1890 Institutions in any field of study in agriculture, food, natural resource sciences or other related disciplines.

The USDA/1890 National Scholars Program will provide full tuition, employment, employment benefits, fees, books, and room and board each year for up to 4 years to selected students pursuing a bachelor’s degree at the following universities:

  • Alabama A&M University
  • Alcorn State University
  • Central State University, Ohio
  • Delaware State University
  • Florida A&M University
  • Fort Valley State University, Georgia
  • Kentucky State University
  • Langston University, Oklahoma
  • Lincoln University, Missouri
  • North Carolina A&T State University
  • Prairie View A&M University, Texas
  • South Carolina State University
  • Southern University, Louisiana
  • Tennessee State University
  • Tuskegee University, Alabama
  • University of Arkansas Pine Bluff
  • University of Maryland Eastern Shore
  • Virginia State University
  • West Virginia State University

Eligible students must be U.S. citizens, have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, have been accepted at one of the 1890 HBCUs, study agriculture, food, natural resource sciences or other related academic disciplines, demonstrate leadership and community service, and etc. Please visit the USDA 1890 National Scholars Program website for more information.

Share this information with all high school students, parents of students, school guidance counselors, principals, teachers, and churches. The scholarship may be renewed each year contingent upon satisfactory academic performance and normal progress toward the bachelor’s degree. High school applications and college applications may be downloaded from the site below:

http://www.outreach.usda.gov/education/1890/

Application and supporting documentation DEADLINE: February 1, 2015