Higher Education Grants of Interest to African Americans

Check out the latest news of grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities!

Johnson C. Smith University, the historically Black educational institution in Charlotte, North Carolina, received a $399,536 grant from the National Science Foundation that will be used to equip its new science center with instruments such as an ultra performance liquid chromatograph and an ultraviolet-visible spectrometer.

Howard University in Washington, D.C. received a $200,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Science for its Portal to the Black Experience project. The new internet portal will allow scholars to search for published and archival materials by race, gender, and other traits.

Winston-Salem State University, the historically Black educational institution in North Carolina, is partnering with Wake Forest University in a $2.3 million grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. The grant will be used for programs aimed at increasing the number of Black and other minority students who pursue doctoral degrees in the biomedical sciences.

Historically Black Clark Atlanta University received a $3.4 grant from the National Science Foundation to lead the Georgia-Alabama Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation in STEM fields. The grant will provide funds for 130 students each year to have research experience in STEM disciplines.

The nursing school at historically Black Hampton University in Virginia received a $1.3 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to increase the enrollment of veterans at the school and to fund programs to help them succeed once they enroll. The grant program is under the direction of Sherri Saunders-Goldson, an assistant professor of nursing at Hampton University who is an Air Force veteran.

Southern University, the historically Black educational institution in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, received a three-year, $900,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for substance abuse and HIV prevention programs targeting African American college students and other young adults between the ages of 18 and 24. The grant program is under the direction of Alma Thornton, director of the Center for Social Research at the university.

Historically Black Morgan State University in Baltimore, received a $250,000 grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation to establish the Urban Digital Journalism program at the university. The funds will be used to train 40 students in broadcast news-gathering techniques and for technical training in digital journalism.

Tuskegee University in Alabama received a $1,003,014 federal grant to increase the number of Black and other minority students in the field of nursing. The funds will be used for recruitment and retention programs and for scholarships.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.