Iredell-Statesville Schools Are Raising Achievement for Students with the Highest Needs

North Carolina’s Iredell-Statesville Schools (I-SS) are raising academic achievement amongst their high-needs students, English learners and students with disabilities. In 2010, I-SS received the $4.99 million Development grant through the U.S. Department of Education’s Investing in Innovation(i3) competition that is making this possible.

I-SS-5th-graders

In one of Iredell-Statesville’s elementary schools, (left to right) 5th-grade students Ashley, Sitaly, Jose, Jasiah, and Bobbie work together during their science intervention time to discover the meaning of “force.” (Photo courtesy of Jada Jonas and the Iredell-Statesville Schools)

Their plan, called COMPASS — the Collaborative Organizational Model to Promote Aligned Support Structures — focuses on aligning support structures for teachers, strengthening collaborations between educators in professional learning communities, analyzing student performance data, improving curricula and developing differentiated instruction to address individual needs and raise academic achievement. According to project director Sherrard Lewis, COMPASS has been “a unifying force — a glue — that brings the data usage, heightened curricular goals, and instructional improvements together.”

COMPASS was implemented in participating schools in three stages, the last of which began during the 2013-2014 school year. The first stage involved staff training and support. The second worked to improve and increase data use to inform teaching practices and curriculum creation.

“When teachers analyze and understand data, it helps them understand a child’s true potential,” Lewis said. The district created quarterly “Data Days,” which allow teachers to focus on student performance data and other measures to identify student needs and then select evidence-based interventions to help students reach specific, measurable goals.

Professional development workshops, managed by the I-SS i3 team, immediately follow the Data Days and are geared to help teachers meet their students’ needs.

One principal involved in the COMPASS program said, “One thing I really appreciated is that the support we’ve gotten this year has really been differentiated based upon the needs of our school … [the COMPASS team’s] support has been very unique and tailored to our schools and what our teachers need.”

Since these initial changes and training sessions, graduation rates have increased for several of the targeted groups. In 2010, for example, high-needs students were graduating at a rate of 65 percent. In 2012, that number had risen to 90.

I-SS will continue to build on this foundation with additional support from a $19.9 million dollar U.S. Department of Education Race to the Top-District grant for a new project called IMPACT — Innovative Methods for Personalizing Academics, Complemented by Technology. Their learner-centered model seeks to reinforce the strides that have already been made through COMPASS.

Cross-posted from the June 10, 2014, article by ED’s Office of Innovation and Improvement.

 

Hawaii Zones of School Innovation Committed to Improvement

Four students pose for a photo, holding vegetables they have picked as part of an agriculture project with Makaha Farms.

Hawaii created two Zones of School Innovation to support regions with many of the state’s lowest performing schools. Schools in these zones benefit from greater flexibility and from state investments in curriculum, professional development, technology, teacher recruitment, and wraparound services such as medical care and nutrition education. Photo credit: Hawaii Department of Education

Investing in teachers, time, services and technology to close achievement gaps

Bem is a ninth-grade student who lives with his parents, cousins and grandparents, migrants from the Marshall Islands, in a sparsely populated area of the island of Hawaii, 25 miles away from Kau High School. There are many obstacles Bem faces on a daily basis to receive an education. Just getting to school regularly is a challenge, as it is for many other students in this largely rural part of the State.

But, lately, Bem has been attending school more regularly and has become more engaged in his school work. He even says he wants to get involved in student government. “He’s been coming to school every day, he’s more serious about his studies and he knows that learning is going to take hard work,” said Kau High and Pahala Elementary Principal Sharon Beck.

A comprehensive set of policies and services put in place over the past few years across the sprawling Kau–Keaau–Pahoa Complex Area of schools is starting to make a difference. Unlike every other State, Hawaii has a single, statewide school system. Complex areas function like school districts in other States. In its successful application for a Federal Race to the Top grant, Hawaii said it would make two complexes—Kau–Keaau–Pahoa on the island of Hawaii and Nanakuli–Waianae on the island of Oahu—Zones of School Innovation (ZSIs) because they each had several schools that were among the lowest performing in the State.

That meant additional flexibilities and investments for ZSI schools including:  more instructional time during the school year as well as in the summer; financial incentives to attract effective teachers and leaders to remote schools; a common curriculum; intensive support for early-career as well as experienced teachers; an infusion of technology to expand students’ understanding of the world; giving principals more control over hiring decisions; and arranging for medical care, mental health counseling, nutrition education and other services.

These enormous changes have led to evidence of progress. Eight of the 18 schools in the zones identified as low-performing four years ago have now met performance targets and, in more than half, student growth is outpacing State averages in both reading and mathematics. Statewide, Hawaii public schools have narrowed the achievement gap by 12 percent, and on-time graduation has increased by seven percent.

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Teachers Leading Transformative Changes in Ohio School Districts

Three teachers discuss strategies.

Photo credit: U.S. Department of Education

Teachers are taking the lead in increasing college and career readiness and improving instruction in several school districts in Southeastern Ohio, according to the Ohio Race to the Top newsletter. High school teachers in the Franklin Local School District near Zanesville developed a Peer Assisted Review process that gives teachers time to plan together and support one another in the classroom. This and other teacher-led initiatives in the district created a “culture of collaboration” and “just-in-time” support for teachers striving to prepare their students for college and career success. Teams of teachers in nearby Coshocton City Schools are working together to assess students and analyze data to improve instruction.

Read more about these teacher-led initiatives here.

Delaware and Hawaii Putting Student Data and Teacher Collaboration at the Heart of Instructional Improvement

Three teachers looks at and discussing student data at North Dover Elementary School in Delaware in order to improve instruction.

Teachers discuss student data at North Dover Elementary School. Photo credit: Lindsay Osika

When North Dover Elementary School in Dover, Delaware was awarded $50,000 as one of the State’s 17 “recognition” schools for its gains in student achievement in 2013, Principal Suzette Marine gave some of the credit to what she called the school’s “Go Green” culture. “Students know that any time their data is green it’s great because students have reached their benchmarks on proficiency levels and are on track for success,” Marine wrote on the school’s website.

“Go Green” refers to the way positive data is displayed on the computer dashboard the school uses to keep track of student progress. Teachers meet with their students several times each year “to look at data and talk about ‘this is where you perform’ and ‘where would you like to be next time’ and ‘what do you need to get to the next level,’” she said. Teachers also meet for 90 minutes once a week to analyze their own performance. “It’s phenomenal the way they lean on each other and they share,” Marine said of her teachers. “When they look at data, they can say, ‘this is my concern, this is what I’m seeing in the classroom’ and then talk together about how to address it.”

Five teachers at North Dover Elementary School discussing student data in order to improve instruction during a Professional Learning Community.

A Professional Learning Community at North Dover Elementary School. Photo credit: Lindsay Osika

That was what State, district and union leaders hoped would happen after winning a Federal Race to the Top grant in 2010. Teachers in many schools already were meeting to discuss their students’ work. The grant deepened the discussions by making it possible to hire coaches. Coaches help teachers in each of the State’s 237 schools become more adept at using student data to focus their instruction on the concepts and skills that their children needed the most help mastering.

As a result of the weekly meetings, which are called “professional learning communities (PLCs),” Marine is seeing much more differentiation of instruction in both reading and mathematics when she observes classrooms. “Teachers are going above and beyond to meet the needs of every student,” she said.

North Dover is one of two schools in the Capital School District that have been recognized by the State for the progress they are making. Pam Herrera, who oversees the professional learning communities for the district, said the entire district is focused on using data and improving instruction as a way of implementing the Common Core State Standards adopted by the State. Those standards, adopted by 45 States and the District of Columbia, emphasize the critical thinking, creativity, and communication skills needed for success in college and careers.

“Our focus is on our students and we communicate that throughout the district in terms of our expectations and cultures and the professional learning communities fit right into that,” Herrera said. “We’re looking at the student data and getting right at the heart of what’s happening with all of our students.”

Christopher Ruszkowski, who heads the Delaware Department of Education’s Teacher and Leader Effectiveness Unit, said he hears comments like that all over the state. “Every teacher, every principal, every superintendent cites the professional learning communities as a core reason they have seen gains over the past three years.”

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