Addressing the Challenges of Developmental Education

On August 12, leaders from across the higher education, philanthropic and non-profit communities gathered to discuss the research, evidence, and challenges associated with reinventing developmental education. Secretary Duncan framed the developmental education challenge as both a completion and equity issue, saying, “As you know, we can no longer use the traditional approach to developmental education, which has been a long sequence of remedial classes that do not count toward a degree and few students are able to complete.”

Read ED’s Homeroom Blog. where Deputy Assistant Secretary Mark Mitsui recaps the meeting and highlights how the White House is building momentum around addressing developmental education challenges.

Renewing Economic Opportunity for All

“For the one million young men and women who are out of school and who are out of work, this program will permit us to take them off the streets, put them into work training programs, to prepare them for productive lives, not wasted lives […] It will help those small businessmen who live on the borderline of poverty. It will help the unemployed heads of families maintain their skills and learn new skills. ”

Photo of President Johnson signing the EOA in a ceremony in the White House rose garden surrounded by onlookers.

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964.

These words were spoken by President Lyndon B. Johnson on August 20, 1964 as he signed the Economic Opportunity Act (EOA), a keystone of the “War on Poverty.” The EOA created several programs across a number of federal agencies that aimed to “eliminate the paradox of poverty in the midst of plenty in this Nation by opening to everyone the opportunity for education and training, the opportunity to work, and the opportunity to live in decency and dignity.” EOA was a legislative milestone that highlighted the need for investments in high quality education for youth as well as adults. In addition to programs like Head Start, Job Corps, and VISTA, EOA authorized federal grants for adult basic education, which marked the beginning of federal statutory involvement in adult literacy. This Law set the stage for other crucial adult education legislation to address the issue of illiteracy such as the Adult Education Act of 1966 and the National Literacy Act of 1991.

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Dear Colleague Letter on School Counseling

Ensuring that students are college and career-ready is a top priority for the Obama Administration. President Obama has called for the United States to lead the world in college completion by 2020.

That’s why, as we prepare for the upcoming school year, the departments of Education, Health and Human Services and Labor are working together to help local school systems around the country make use of the available resources to help ensure our young people are the best prepared workers in the world. Through this cross-agency collaboration, we are sharing information about how federal resources can help provide relevant and timely information so students can plan for their future careers.

The Departments have sent a jointly signed letter to education, workforce development, social services, and private-sector leaders around the country asking them to join us in our commitment to help high schools utilize the resources available to them through their local American Job Centers. We believe this effort will not only prepare our students for future jobs, but will secure the United States’ place in the global economy.

School guidance counselors play a critical role is preparing our students for college and careers, but the growing number of students compared to counselors may mean not every student can get the attention they need to find their path to their desired career.

That’s where the federal job training services can help. By leveraging the resources available from the nearly 2,500 American Job Centers around the country, schools can ensure their students are getting the most up-to-date information about the job market and what education and training is necessary to land their dream job.

In today’s global economy, opportunity and success have never been more closely linked to the education and skills you have.  That’s why connecting workforce services to education makes common sense.  These connections – which already help job seekers and employers to connect with one another – will help students better understand the skills they need to succeed in today’s job market, while they are in a position to make the decisions at an earlier age.

The American Job Center network can supplement the activities of school counselors by providing career development services and local labor market information, offering career counseling, resume and interview help, share information about Registered Apprenticeships and pre-apprenticeship programs like Job Corps and YouthBuild, and create opportunities for summer and year-around youth employment.

Some states have already begun to integrate these services. In Wisconsin, school officials developed the Career 101 initiative that provides career information to students that promotes career awareness and supports learning about career opportunities. Or take Minneapolis Promise, a local initiative that uses private funding to locate College and Career Centers inside all seven Minneapolis public high schools and eight specialty high schools. The centers offer students career and college planning resources, trained career counselors to guide students, and an online career planning tool to help each ninth-grader develop a personalized “My Life Plan.”

These partnerships can help ensure that high school students have the information they need to be ready for college and careers, and alleviate some of the gaps in college and career counseling that is provided in high schools today.

Tuba City High School CTE Students Graduate with College Degrees

Tuba City High School awarded students in their Early Childhood Education (ECE) career and technical education program Child Development Associates (CDA) degrees. Tuba City is the third school in the nation to award CDA National Credentials to high school students. The program was developed in partnership with Coconino Community College and funded as part of a discretionary grant that was awarded to the State of Arizona by OCTAE.

The Tuba City CTE program and its seven CDA graduates were featured in articles in the Arizona Daily Sun and the Navajo-Hopi Observer.

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CCR Standards Implementation Institute Registration Opens

Registration is now open for the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards Implementation Institutes. The two-day institute will be offered three times:

April 1-2, New Orleans LA

April 30-May 1, Phoenix AZ

June 4-5, Washington DC

The goal of these training institutes is to provide adult education program staff with understanding of the fundamental advances in instruction and curriculum materials specified by the CCR standards, and to offer new ways to incorporate these techniques and materials into adult education programs.

States and programs are encouraged to send a team of three to five staff, so that instructional leaders in literacy and mathematics as well as program administrators and professional development staff will benefit from the sessions. There is no fee for registration, attendance, or materials. Interested teams will be responsible only for their travel, meal, and hotel costs.

CCR Standards Implementation Institute Dates Announced

OVAE is pleased to announce an exciting opportunity for adult education staff at both the state and local levels to receive hands-on training at the upcoming College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards for Adult Education: Implementation Institute. The Implementation Institute will be repeated in three regional locations:

  • April 1-2 in New Orleans, LA
  • April 30-May 1 in Phoenix, AZ
  • June 4-5 in Washington, DC

The institute will bring together expert coaches in literacy and mathematics to provide training and individualized support to teams of educators on how implementation of CCR standards would impact instruction and curriculum. Throughout the 2-day institute, attendees will develop a practical and transferable understanding of:

  • The CCR Standards for Adult Education (2013)
  • The fundamental shifts in instruction and curriculum that the standards indicate
  • Alignment between current state standards and the demands of CCR standards
  • Different approaches for how to implement CCR standards successfully
  • Concrete steps to begin to transform instructional and curriculum approaches and materials

Susan Pimentel and StandardsWork, Inc. are conducting this institute, on behalf of OVAE, as a way to assist programs—no matter where they are on the continuum of standards implementation—with creating a sustainable model for advancing CCR standards-based reform. To provide a rich training experience, states and programs are encouraged to send a team of two or more staff members. The team should include instructional leaders or administrators who are responsible for literacy and mathematics, program management or professional development. States/programs will be responsible for supporting the travel and hotel costs for each team member.

Watch for more information about the CCR Standards for Adult Education: Implementation Institute, including how to register, in early 2014.

Maine CTE: It’s Not Your Parents’ Vocational Education

Cross-posted from the U.S. Department of Education blog.

Students at the Biddeford Regional Center of Technology in Biddeford, Maine are excited about learning — and they’re eager to tell you why.  They can also show you some pretty impressive proof that they’ve mastered the concepts they’ve studied.

Take, for example, the house they built as the capstone of one project.

Programs at Biddeford Regional Center of Technology

A selection of CTE programs offered at Biddeford Regional Center of Technology

“It’s not just about wiring a house, it’s about the theory and science [of] what is actually happening in the wires. In my other classes, you don’t really get hands-on, you just do what’s in the book,” a senior at the Center recently explained to visitors from the U.S. Department of Education.

Part of my role as a Teaching Ambassador Fellow (TAF) is to help teachers and other educators around the country learn about the Department’s efforts to support world-class teaching and learning. But, it’s just as important for us to bring teacher, principal, and student perspectives back to policymakers in Washington. For both those reasons, I traveled to Biddeford.

Right now, there’s an important shift taking place in schools and districts across the United States: a shift away from vocational education, and toward career and technical education, or CTE. The narrow vocational training of our parents’ and grandparents’ day was often separated from the college preparatory curriculum, and geared to the needs of the industrial age. Today’s CTE programs are designed to meet the needs and opportunities of the global economy and the digital age, and prepare students for equal success in college and careers.

When change is this ambitious, it can take a while for old perceptions to catch up to new realities. CTE teachers and students in CTE courses often find themselves having to correct the belief that CTE courses are less rigorous than traditional “college prep” classes. The experiences of the students and teachers at Biddeford certainly debunked this myth.

Biddeford offers professionally certified programs in career fields like legal studies, architecture, early childhood education, and health sciences. The students told us they feel good about learning a combination of academic, technical and employability skills that will equip them for success in college and in the 21st century’s technology-rich, team-based, results-oriented professions.

The teachers we spoke with called the Center “a direct link to college.” They explained that participating in the Biddeford program helps students set their sights on postsecondary education, giving them confidence in their abilities and real-world opportunities to apply ideas. A health sciences teacher, for example, spoke proudly of Biddeford graduates who are now in medical school or have launched careers as pharmacists, physical therapists, and registered nurses.

The CTE students at this regional center attend their home school for half of the day. Then, they travel by bus to Biddeford, to spend the second half-day in courses directly related to a career pathway, including work-based learning and other activities that require them to think critically, put theory into practice, and serve as constructive team members.  They graduate with a high school diploma and certification in their field.  This allows them to go directly to work in high-demand jobs, or continue their education at a community or four-year college.

A senior electrical engineering student explained the extra value he’ll be able to provide to his employer, beyond a strong grasp of the scientific skills his field requires. That added value is leadership: something he’s been able to practice in his classes, and as a member of a student council that offers peer-to-peer outreach.

Secretary Duncan has said that “a career-ready student must have the knowledge and skills that employers need from day one. That means having critical thinking and problem-solving skills, an ability to synthesize information, solid communication skills, and the ability to work well on a team.”

As these learners discussed the house they’d built, it was clear that they’re engaged in something worlds away from the “voc ed” of a generation ago. They didn’t just pound nails into 2 x 4 planks. Instead, they applied a wide range of academic and technical skills – from architectural design principles, to safety rules, to the physics of wiring. They also exercised the key critical thinking and communication skills they’ll need to get ahead, no matter what professions they ultimately pursue.

As one student put it, “If communication isn’t happening, that’s a safety issue – and the project doesn’t get completed.”  You can’t get much more real-world than that.

The students at Biddeford showed us what today’s career and technical education can look like: CTE that prepares 21st century learners for the demands of 21st century college and careers.

Kareen Borders is a 2012-2013 Full-Time Teaching Ambassador Fellows at the U.S. Department of Education.

Read the Department of Education’s Blueprint for Transforming Career and Technical Education

Join a Discussion on Standards in Adult Education

Join a week-long event on LINCS.ed.gov  to explore Kentucky’s Strategic Initiative to implement Common Core standards in adult education.  The event begins with a free webinar on Monday, June 24  from 2:00-3:00pm ET; click here to register. The webinar will be followed by discussion in the LINCS online community’s College and Career Standards topic group. To participate in the online discussion, join the LINCS Community.

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The Key Shifts Behind College and Career Readiness Standards

Susan Pimentel has been involved with OVAE for the past decade assisting states with the establishment and implementation of standards-based education.  At the Annual State Directors Meeting (ASDM) on May 22, she presented an overview of the recently released College and Career Readiness Standards document while making a strong case for increasing the rigor of adult education teaching and learning.  “It is crucial that adult students have the opportunity to acquire skills they need for postsecondary and career success,” she said.

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Pre-solicitation for Implementing College and Career Readiness Standards

OVAE is seeking a contractor for the new procurement, Implementing College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards in Adult Education. This project will support the development and delivery of educational programs able to prepare adult students for postsecondary school and career success through the state adoption and implementation of the CCR Standards for Adult Education.

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