Family & Consumer Sciences delegates visit DC

Gayla Randel standing at podium

NASAFACS President, Gayla Randel addresses the audience

The Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education recently held a briefing to learn how Family and Consumer Sciences Education is contributing to the Administration’s education priorities.

State leaders of the National Association of State Administrators of Family and Consumer Sciences (NASAFACS) addressed the importance of career-ready foundation for all youth and adults, and explained how its programs, standards, and instructional strategies are preparing students to succeed in their careers and communities. In particular, the audience heard how Family and Consumer Sciences Education improves college and career readiness and workforce success by addressing foundational STEM literacy, 21st century employability skills development, and the technical skills in career clusters with high labor demand.

a group of NASAFACS members stand in front of the flags of the Department of Education and U.S. Flags

A NASAFACS delegation attended the briefing during its visit to Washington D.C. for its annual meeting.

Gayla Randel, the 2014-15 President of NASAFACS, explained how Family and Consumer Sciences provides foundational life skill development, employability skills education, and workforce education and training through more than 27,000 middle and secondary level teachers who reach approximately 3.5 million students annually. These students represent a range of diverse communities in large and small educational systems and from all geographic locations in the United States.

Materials from the briefing can be downloaded below:
Download PDF – 2 Pages STEM and FCS
Download PDF – 2 pages FCS and Workforce Connections Issue Brief
Download PDF – 45 pages NASAFACS Presentation

WIOA: A Vision to Revitalize the Workforce System

Reminder: Public comments are being accepted on the 5 proposed notices of rulemaking until June 15, 2015. See the announcement with docket numbers, an FAQ document, a recorded statement by Acting Assistant Secretary Uvin, and a recorded webinar on entering comments.

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) aims to increase access to and opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services, particularly for individuals with the greatest barriers to employment. WIOA, which marks the most significant change to the Federal adult education, vocational rehabilitation, and workforce development systems in more than a decade, promotes stronger alignment of workforce, education, vocational rehabilitation, and other human services systems in order to improve the structure and delivery of services to individuals, including adults and youth with disabilities and others who face barriers to employment.

While the Departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services have always strived to create and expand access to education, training, and employment opportunities for the millions of youth and adults who seek services through their programs, WIOA modernizes and streamlines the workforce development system to offer holistic, wrap around services to support gainful employment in the competitive integrated labor market. WIOA also supports innovative strategies to keep pace with changing economic conditions and calls for improved collaboration among agencies, not just at the State and local levels, but also at the Federal level.

The successful implementation of WIOA will require States and local areas to establish strong partnerships with core programs and other partners in the community, including local educational agencies, in order to successfully serve program participants, workers, and learners. WIOA’s unified and combined state planning provisions support this coordination by requiring a four-year strategy based on an analysis of workforce, employment and unemployment data, labor market trends, and the educational and skills level of a State’s workforce. The strategic planning process will help States align education, employers, and the public workforce system for efficient and effective use of resources. This coordinated planning will also ensure that programs and services are responsive to employer, business, and regional and community needs.

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SkillsUSA Celebrates its 50th Anniversary

Happy Birthday, SkillsUSA!

Tim Lawrence and Karen Ward stand and cut the first slice of the birthday cake while Brooke Johnson stands in the background

National SkillsUSA Executive Director, Tim Lawrence, and SkillsUSA Massachusetts Director, Karen Ward, cut the birthday cake. President Brooke Johnson looks on.

SkillsUSA celebrated its 50th anniversary on May 8th at its National Leadership Center in Leesburg, Virginia, by celebrating with a Founders Day to recognize the contributions of its members, their instructors, administrators, state association directors, industry partners and alumni.

Some of the event highlights included a dedication of the new entryway of the Leadership Center, designed and constructed by students, memories and testimonies shared among charter members, state directors, and former members, and the opening of the 25th Anniversary Time Capsule.

Brooke Johnson and Ahmad Shawwal stand at a podium

SkillsUSA 2014-15 Presidents Brooke Johnson, NC and Ahmad Shawwal, VA, at the podium during the flag raising ceremony of the 50th Anniversary of SkillUSA celebrations.

Over its 50 years, cumulative membership is more than 11.9 million. The 2014-15 membership of SkillsUSA is 360,404. Its first conference in Nashville, Tennessee 50 years ago brought 200 students, teachers and administrators together. Last year more than 16,000 attended the annual National Leadership and Skills Conference.

SkillsUSA was founded as the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA) with a goal of establishing a nationwide organization to represent trade and industrial education and serve students’ needs. VICA was changed to SkillsUSA in 2004 but what has not changed is the organization’s commitment to help students discover career interests, develop relevant skills to compete globally, and value their own self-worth. SkillsUSA continues to reach toward the founders’ vision, whether it’s fulfilling the 1965 motto of “Preparing for Leadership in the World of Work” or helping to develop today’s “Champions at Work”.

SkillsUSA and is a partnership of students, teachers and industry working together to ensure America has a skilled workforce. SkillsUSA helps each student excel by providing educational programs, events and competitions that support career and technical education (CTE) in the nation’s classrooms.

You can find more information about SkillsUSA on their website at SkillsUSA.org.

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Robin Utz serves as the chief for the College and Career Transitions branch in the Division of Academic and Technical Education (DATE) for Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) at the US Department of Education.

Upskill America: More Education and Training for Front-line Workers

YouTube video of Vice President Speaking at Upskill

Remarks by Vice President Biden at the March 24, 2015 Upskill Summit.

On April 24, the White House convened nearly 200 employers, labor leaders, foundations, non-profits, educators, workforce leaders and technologists who are answering the President’s call to action to join his Upskill Initiative, a new campaign to help workers of all ages and backgrounds earn a shot at better, higher-paying jobs. The Upskill Initiative is a public-private effort to create clear pathways for the over 20 million workers in front-line jobs who may too often lack the skills or opportunity to progress into higher-paying jobs, and realize their full potential.

Since the President’s call to action in January, the Upskill Initiative has already made significant progress with an initial set of partners and resources already on board:

  • Over 100 leading employers – representing more than 5 million workers – and 30 national and local labor unions answering the President’s call to action
  • Coalition of 10 national business networks partnering together to form Upskill America
  • New tools and resources for workers and employers

Last week’s White House Summit is just the beginning for the Upskill campaign. As the President and Vice President have highlighted, the Initiative’s success will require much more: Employers and labor leaders, philanthropists and tech innovators, educators and workforce leaders, and more committed to unlocking the potential of every American worker.

What is adult education’s role in the Upskill Initiative?

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Exploring Games for Learning

How can games transform education? That question was at the core of the Games for Learning summit that was held in New York City in conjunction with the 12th Annual Games for Change Festival. The Office of Education Technology led the day-long event that convened educators, game developers, and technology companies to discuss the latest trends, products, and barriers to developing games that effectively deliver education content.

Photo a crowd viewing a series of video displays with demonstrations of games

Game developers try the latest educational games at the Games for Change Festival in New York City.

OCTAE had the opportunity to announce the EdSim Challenge that will be launching soon. The EdSim, or Educational Simulations, Challenge seeks to demonstrate the value of establishing a predictable framework for developers, schools, and businesses to develop and use high-quality immersive 3D simulations to deliver high-quality CTE. The framework will be developed through a crowdsourced comment phase through which the public can recommend technology and educational approaches to integrate into the challenge.

To stay updated on the EdSim Challenge and receive notification when the public comment period opens, register for email notifications on EdPrizes.com.

Also on Twitter at #EdSimChallenge and #EdPrizes.

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act — Five Notices of Proposed Rulemaking Available for Public Comment

On April 16, 2015, the U.S. Departments of Education (ED) and Labor (DOL) announced the release of five notices of proposed rulemaking (NPRMs) related to the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), signed into law on July 22, 2014.  The NPRMs are available for public comment on the Federal Register website at http://www.regulations.gov.  We encourage you to share this information with interested stakeholders.

The five NPRMs include:

  • DOL NPRM – This NPRM proposes to implement changes made to titles I and III of WIOA, including the adult, dislocated worker, and youth formula programs; state and local workforce development boards; designation of regions and local areas; local plans; the one-stop system; and national programs authorized under title I; and amends the Wagner-Peyser Act under title III. Provide your comments on docket ETA-2015-0001.
  • Joint Rule for Unified and Combined State Plans, Performance Accountability, and the One-Stop System Joint Provisions —The U.S. Departments of Education and Labor developed a joint rule proposing to implement jointly-administered activities under title I of WIOA regarding Unified and Combined State Plans, performance accountability, and the one-stop system. The proposed rules in the joint NPRM apply to all core programs, including the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services and the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act programs. Provide your comments on docket ETA-2015-0002.
  • Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) NPRM – This NPRM proposes to implement changes to programs and activities authorized under AEFLA, which is contained in title II of WIOA. Provide your comments on docket ED-2015-OCTAE-0003.
  • Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Rehabilitation Act)—These two NPRMs propose to implement changes made to the programs authorized under the Rehabilitation Act, which is contained in title IV of WIOA, as well as implement new provisions:
    • State Vocational Rehabilitation Services program; State Supported Employment Services program; Limitations on the Use of Subminimum Wage – This NPRM proposes to implement changes to the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services program and the State Supported Employment Services program, as well as implement provisions in new Section 511 (Limitations on the Use of Subminimum Wages). Provide your comments on docket ED-2015-OSERS-0001.
    • Miscellaneous program changes – This NPRM proposes to implement changes to other Rehabilitation Act programs administered by ED. Provide your comments on docket ED-2015-OSERS-0002.

The Departments invite public comment on the proposed regulations for 60 days following publication in the Federal Register.  Comments may be submitted online at www.regulations.gov or hard copy comments may be submitted via postal mail, commercial delivery, or hand delivery.  Instructions for submitting public comments are described in each of the NPRMs published in the Federal Register.  Any comments not received through the processes outlined in the NPRMs will not be considered by the departments.  All comments must be received on or before June 15, 2015.

View the joint DOL and ED press release announcing the release of the NPRMs.

For more information on the NPRMs and additional resources, please visit www.ed.gov/aefla.

CTE Student celebrated at White House Science Fair

Photo of Eric Koehlmoos standing with his research exhibit

Eric Koehlmoos appears with his Grass to Gas research at the 2015 White House Science Fair

Eric Koehlmoos, a Career and Technical Education student and member of the National FFA Organization was recognized at the 2015 White House Science Fair that was held on March 26 for his “Grass to Gas” project. Eric, 18, is a member of the South O’Brien FFA Chapter in Paulina, Iowa. He was invited to participate in the Fair that celebrates the accomplishments of student winners of a broad range of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) competitions throughout the United States.

More than 100 of the nation’s brightest young minds were welcomed to the fifth White House Science fair. In the past, innovative inventions, discoveries and science projects have been showcased.

Koehlmoos won first place in the Power, Structural and Technical Systems category at the 2014 National FFA Agriscience Fair, a special project of the National FFA Foundation that was sponsored by Cargill, Bayer CropScience, John Deere, PotashCorp and Syngenta. The fair was held during the National FFA Convention & Expo and featured the research and results of FFA members who plan on pursuing careers in the science and technology of agriculture. This accomplishment earned him the special White House invitation.

Koehlmoos’ project, “Grass to Gas,” consisted of three years of research with prairie cordgrass and switch grass and their potential impact in the cellulosic ethanol industry.
“Because I come from a farm background I was very interested in the biofuel industry and the new cellulosic ethanol plants being built near my house,” Koehlmoos said.

Photo of Eric Koehlmoos standing with the White House in the background

Eric Koehlmoos stands in front of the White House during his visit to Washington, D.C.

During his three years of research, Koehlmoos found that both grasses produce nearly 200 more gallons of ethanol per acre than corn and wheat straw, two mainstream methods for ethanol production. He also discovered that when both grasses are pretreated with calcium hydroxide, ethanol yields are increased by as much as 80 percent and produces a byproduct that has higher protein values than corn distiller grains.

Koehlmoos plans to continue his research in college and would ultimately like to use these grasses to commercially produce ethanol in the Southern Plains, which would provide a sustainable solution to importing foreign oil while also not competing with the food supply.

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Education Program Specialist, OCTAE

Impact Data on Adult Ed Program Participation

This article first appeared in the OCTAE Connection newsletter March 26, 2015. You can access that issue here

OCTAE commissioned Dr. Stephen Reder, professor in the Department of Applied Linguistics at Portland State University, to create five research briefs using that university’s Longitudinal Study of Adult Learning (LSAL) data to examine the long-term impacts of adult basic skills (ABS) program participation on a range of outcome measures. The study was part of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy, with funding provided by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Institute for Literacy. All entities interested in or serving adult learners are encouraged to review each of the briefs in their entirety for a comprehensive discussion of the findings, as well as data graphics, and references. Links to each of them can be found in the summaries below.  PDFs for the series may be accessed on LINCS.

Background: National as well as international studies, including the Survey of Adult Skills, demonstrate the need and economic value of ABS. Yet, there is little rigorous research demonstrating that participation in basic skills programs directly impacts the skill levels, educational attainment, or social and economic well-being of adults with low levels of education.

Figure 1: Percentage of study participants who ever participated in programs .

Figure 1 shows the estimated percentage of the LSAL population that ever participated in an ABS program through each given wave of the study (line graph), as well as the median total hours of program attendance accumulated by participants (bar graph).

Most research on adult literacy development has only examined the short-term changes occurring as students pass through single ABS programs. Most studies use short follow-up intervals and include only program participants—making it difficult to see the long-term patterns of both program participation and persistence, and the ability to assess the long-term impact of ABS program participation. ABS program evaluation and accountability studies have shown small gains for program participants in test scores and other outcomes, but they rarely include comparison groups of nonparticipants and, studies that do include such controls have not found statistically significant ABS program impact. In short, more research is needed that compares adult literacy development among program participants and nonparticipants across multiple contexts and over significant periods of time.  This will provide life-wide and lifelong perspectives on adult literacy development and a better assessment of program impacts on a range of outcome measures.

The LSAL is one study that does address these long-term impacts. Between 1998 and 2007, LSAL randomly sampled and tracked nearly 1,000 high school dropouts’ participation in ABS programs. The study assessed their literacy skills and skill uses over time, along with changes in their social, educational, and economic status, to provide a more comprehensive representation of adult literacy development.

Brief Summaries: 

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College and Career Readiness Standards-in-Action

“It’s essential to keep rigorous content standards at the heart of instructional planning, delivery, and evaluation.” Christopher Coro, Deputy Director of the Division of Adult Education and Literacy, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE)

That is exactly what 66 adult educators from 12 states did throughout their participation in an intensive, three-day training workshop held in Washington D.C., March 17-19, 2015. The workshop was designed in response to the following question: What do adult educators need to know and be able to do to translate content standards into college and career readiness (CCR) aligned curriculum and instruction?  Participants will tell you they know now! They spent three action-packed days learning the core instructional actions to effectively implement CCR standards in adult education classrooms.

Under the guidance of StandardsWork Inc. staff and coaches/trainers, participants delved into the instructional and institutional implications of CCR standards. Half the participants worked with the CCR standards for English language arts/literacy while others immersed themselves in the math standards.  Now team members know how to:

  • Determine the alignment of an instructional resource to the standards,
  • Revise the resource to improve its alignment, and
  • Create CCR-aligned lessons.

And they know how to implement their training and the tools and lessons with instructors across their states. Participants left the workshop equipped with ready-to-use training material that will enable professional development staff to provide training activities statewide.

Between now and June 2015, the 12 teams will pilot the training in up to two local-programs in their states (AZ, CO, CT, IL, KY, ME, MA, MN, MT, PA, TN, and VA).  Simultaneously, they are engaging in longer-range planning to scale up what they learned regarding translating standards into CCR-aligned curriculum and instruction statewide. Implementation teams will continue to have access to StandardsWork staff and coaches to assist with their sustainable implementation of CCR standards. In September 2015, everyone will return to Washington D.C. for a second training workshop, Improving Student Assignments and Conducting Focused Classroom Observations.

OCTAE is proud to partner with StandardsWork, coaches, and participants in taking these next steps in improving adult education services for our adult learners. See previously released materials from this project and the College and Career Readiness in Adult Education report.