Version 2.0 of ED Data Express Now Live!

The Department is excited to announce the launch of version 2.0 of ED Data Express, an interactive Web site aimed at making accurate and timely K-12 education data available to the public.

The new version provides the public with more dynamic tools interact with the data such as –

  • A mapping feature that allows users to view the data displayed on a map of the United States;
  • A trend line tool, which displays a data element graphed across multiple school years;
  • A conditional analysis tool, which allows users to view one data element based on conditions set by another data element.

In addition, the site has improved documentation and added the ability to share information from the site using social networking tools, such as Facebook or Twitter. To view or explore the upgraded ED Data Express Web site, visit www.eddataexpress.ed.gov.

Summer 2011 Issue of the School Turnaround Newsletter

The Summer 2011 issue of the School Turnaround Newsletter is now available! The newsletter is a resource for states, districts, and schools who are undergoing school turnaround under the School Improvement Grants (SIG) program. This issue highlights NEA’s work with SIG schools under the Priority Schools Campaign, provides an example of a successful state monitoring system, and features an interview with a principal on implementing extended learning time. Past issues of the newsletter can be found here.

Summer Seminars at Six: An Introduction to Education Policy

I’m pleased to invite you to a series of summer seminars hosted by the Department of Education called “Summer Seminars at Six: An Introduction to Education Policy.”

The seminars are designed to share information about education policy that will help teachers to be engaged and participate in policy discussions at the federal, state and district level. Led by teachers working at the Department, along with other staff, there will be opportunities for questions and discussion both in person and online.

Dates:  Every other Thursday:  July14, July 28, August 11 and August 25.
Time: 6:00 PM ET-7:00 PM ET
Location: U.S. Department of Education’s LBJ Building (400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20202) and online through U-Stream.

  • An ED 101 Primer, Thursday, July 14. Questions to be answered include:
    • What is the mission or purpose of the U.S. Department of Education?
    • How is education funded in the United States?
    • What is the organizational structure of ED, and where can I go for help with my issue?
    • What is Title I and how does it work?
  • Who’s on First? State and Federal Roles and Responsibilities for Education, Thursday, July 28. Questions to be answered include:
    • What are the states’ and the federal government’s responsibilities for education?
    • What is the Common Core?
    • What are the primary ED funding streams and competitive programs?
    • What is Race to the Top and how does it support teachers and students?
  • Fixing What’s Broken in No Child Left Behind, Thursday, August, 11. Questions to be answered include:
    • The Elementary and Secondary Education Act and No Child Left Behind—same or different?
    • What problems are teachers, schools, and states having with NCLB?
    • In their Blueprint for Reform, what do President Obama and Secretary Duncan propose to do to fix what is not working in NCLB?
    • What does the Blueprint propose with regard to testing?
    • What is the federal School Improvement Grant program for low-performing schools and how might it affect my school or state?
  • Leading Their Profession: Teachers and Education Policy, Thursday, August 25. Questions to be answered include:
    • What are ED’s proposals for strengthening teaching and supporting teachers?
    • What does the Blueprint say about teacher evaluations?
    • What can teachers do to get involved in educational issues both at the national level and in their state or district?
    • What are the Teacher Incentive Fund and Title II?

Register to attend the Summer Seminars at the U.S. Department of Education or to view the Summer Seminars online through U-Stream.

Meet the Expert: Dr. Melendez Featured on Colorín Colorado

Colorín Colorado, a free web-based, bilingual service that provides information, activities, and advice for educators and Spanish-speaking families of English language learners, has posted a new video interview with Dr. Melendez for their “Meet the Expert” series.

Through this series of videos, Dr. Melendez talks about her favorite teacher, her experiences growing up as an English learner, and her thoughts on how educators and administrators can better support the growth and success of English learners. In the video below, Dr. Melendez recounts a story about Jesus, a special first grade student.

The rest of the videos and the transcript of the video can be found here.

The Power of Mentors

I’m headed to Dallas in a few days to give a keynote speech at the national conference of the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBS). I’m excited to be able to meet the wonderful staff, mentors, and mentees who are part of this organization, and to help them reaffirm their commitment to serving our neediest youth, particularly those from low-income and minority backgrounds. Studies have shown that mentors have a positive effect on all aspects of their mentees’ lives — in school, at home, and with friends. Organizations like BBBS are also critical partners for our schools and districts, to provide the necessary support our children need for academic and personal success.

This event also has a special meaning for me, because I was invited to speak by one of my own mentors, Dr. Raymund Paredes, who serves as the chair of Big Brothers Big Sisters’ Nationwide Hispanic Advisory Council, and is currently the commissioner of higher education for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. I first met Dr. Paredes as a college student at UCLA, and he’s become one of my most trusted mentors and advisors. I’m honored to be able to share my own experiences with wonderful mentors like Dr. Paredes, and to provide encouragement to current mentors who are changing lives, one on one.

SIG Baseline Report, Database and Map Now Available

I’m pleased to announce that IES has released the Department’s first report on the revamped School Improvement Grant (SIG), called “Baseline Analyses of SIG Applications and SIG-Eligible and SIG-Awarded Schools“. This report uses publicly-available data from State Education Agency (SEA) websites, SEA SIG applications, and the National Center for Education Statistics’ Common Core of Data to provide initial information on SIG-related policies and practices that states intend to implement, and the characteristics of both SIG-eligible and SIG-awarded schools. We’re also making available the entire database of SIG data to the public — you can find links to the database and documentation below. Finally, a mapping tool for the SIG data is available at http://data.ed.gov/grants/school-improvement-grants.

Some of the key highlights of the analyses in the report on SIG-eligible and SIG-awarded schools include the following:

  • 15,277 schools, or 16 percent of all schools nationwide, were eligible for SIG.
  • Given the program’s intent, SIG-awarded schools were, as expected, more likely to be high-poverty (75 percent), high-minority (86 percent), urban schools in comparison to elementary and secondary schools nationwide.
  • SIG-awarded schools are more likely to be high schools: high schools constitute 21 percent of schools nationwide and 19 percent of SIG-eligible schools, but constitute 40 percent of SIG-awarded schools.
  • The average total award among Tier I and Tier II schools was $2.54 million.
  • The majority of districts with SIG-awarded schools (62 percent) have only one SIG-awarded school.
  • Forty-three districts (7 percent of the 576 districts with SIG-awarded schools) across 24 states and the District of Columbia have 5 or more SIG-awarded schools.

SIG Funding to States and Schools

  • The average state award was $65 million, and the median state award was $39.7 million.
  • Among the different intervention models, turnaround schools received the largest total awards ($2.96 million per school).
  • By school level, high schools received the largest total allocation ($2.37 million), whereas non-standard schools (i.e. schools with a grade configuration not falling within the elementary, middle or high school categories) received the highest per-pupil grants ($1,880).
  • Schools in eleven states will receive an increase in per-pupil funding of 30 percent or more as a result of SIG.

The report also analyzes State SIG applications in fiscal year 2009, including how State Educational Agencies defined and identified what they meant by “persistently lowest achieving schools,” what types of monitoring strategies they would be using to monitor progress toward SIG goals, and other measures of support and technical assistance States are supporting SIG implementation.

Among the SIG-eligible schools:

  • Twenty-seven states and the District of Columbia defined secondary school as including both middle and high school levels, or those schools serving 6th through 12th grade.
  • Seventeen states will prioritize Tier III schools that commit to implementing one of the four intervention models.

The SIG database contains 15,518 SIG-eligible schools across 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE), including 1,247 SIG-awarded schools across 49 states. The database has information on all the SIG-related data you may be curious about, from information on award allocations, to SIG model selection, to demographic information on SIG-awarded schools. For more informtaion on SIG, please visit http://www2.ed.gov/programs/sif/index.html

Attachment Size
SIG Database Documentation.pdf 150.46 KB
sig_database.xls 8.91 MB

Next Week: Education Stakeholders Forum on TA and Comprehensive Centers

I’ll be hosting an Education Stakeholders Forum to be held Wednesday, May 11th, 2011, at 1:00 p.m., at the Department’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. We’ll be soliciting input and feedback on how we can improve the delivery of technical assistance through our partnership with Regional Comprehensive Center.

For more information, please visit this page: Information about Education Stakeholder Forum meetings and registering

Thanking Mrs. Silverman

Cross posted from the ED.gov blog.

I still remember how nervous I was during my first day of school, as a new kindergartener at Fremont Elementary. As the daughter of Mexican immigrants, I only spoke Spanish at home. So, I was worried about how I would fare in school. Would I understand what my teacher was saying to me? How would I make friends? What if I didn’t like school?Mrs.Silverman

Thanks to Mrs. Silverman, I didn’t have to worry about any of that. She welcomed me into her classroom and helped me fit in, even going so far as to set up a play date for me and a classmate, Brenda, who would go onto be my best friend. Gradually, she taught me my second language, while never devaluing or trying to erase my first. Most importantly, she showed me how magical learning could be, and set me on a path to academic success.

It is in large part because of Mrs. Silverman that I became a teacher. To this day, I have a photo of her with some of my classmates and me that appeared in a district newsletter. And whenever I have the opportunity to speak about the power of education, my story always seems to come back to Mrs. Silverman. Every so often, I do a search online for her, to see if I can find her, and tell her in person how much she’s done for me.  I haven’t found her, but I’ll continue to share broadly my memories of Mrs. Silverman. Maybe that’s my way of thanking her over and over again for all that she did for me – though I sure would like the chance to tell her in person.