Teacher Quality Partnership Grant Program
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Feature: Take a Walk on the Historical Side

Teachers view Among the Sierra Nevada, California Teachers view “Among the Sierra Nevada, California” (National Portrait Gallery). Teachinghistory.org, 2012. As a high school history teacher gazes up at an enormous mural, he begins to plan an activity that engages his students in careful analysis of both the image and its historical context. Listening to a drum beat while she walks in the footsteps of a Civil War soldier, a fourth-grade teacher gains an appreciation for the power of music and of historic places. She learns new ways to incorporate multiple senses into her classroom, opening student minds through the sounds, smells, and tastes of the past. 

Whether it takes place in a national museum, on a working seventeenth-century farm, or in a library or archive, professional development that allows teachers to explore history in person can be a powerful learning experience. But what are the components of good history and social studies workshops for teachers? What roles can cultural institutions, such as museums, libraries, archives, and historic sites, play in creating quality learning opportunities for educators? What strategies help teachers translate these experiences into classroom learning, inspiring students to think in new ways?

March 30, 2010

Education Secretary Duncan Announces New Teacher Quality Grants Aimed at Improving Student Academic Success

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced the award of $99.8 million for 12 new five-year Teacher Quality Partnership grants that aim to raise student achievement by improving instruction in our nation's schools.

September 30, 2009

Education Secretary Duncan Announces $43 Million in Grants to Improve Teaching in High-Need Schools

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced the award of $43 million for 28 new five-year Teacher Quality Partnership grants to improve instruction in struggling schools. These grants will be used to reform traditional university teacher preparation and teacher residency programs.

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