School Improvement Grants
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February 17, 2011

Minnesota to Receive $4.79 Million to Turn Around Its Persistently Lowest-Achieving Schools

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced that Minnesota will receive $4.79 million to turn around its persistently lowest achieving schools through the School Improvement Grants (SIG) program. The funds are part of $546 million available to states for the School Improvement Grant program in fiscal year 2010.

February 17, 2011

Alaska to Receive $1.64 Million to Turn Around Its Persistently Lowest-Achieving Schools

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced that Alaska will receive $1.64 million to continue to turn around its persistently lowest-achieving schools through the School Improvement Grants (SIG) program. The funds are part of $546 million available to states for the School Improvement Grant program in fiscal year 2010.

December 3, 2009

Applications Now Available for $3.5 Billion in Title I School Improvement Grants to Turn Around Nation's Lowest Achieving Public Schools

Today, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced the final requirements for $3.5 billion in Title I School Improvement grants to turn around the nation's lowest performing schools. The applications are now available at http://www.ed.gov/programs/sif/applicant.html and are due into the Department of Education by Feb. 8, 2010.

August 26, 2009

Obama Administration Announces Historic Opportunity to Turn Around Nation's Lowest-Achieving Public Schools

Today, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced draft requirements for $3.5 billion in Title I School Improvement grants to turn around the nation's lowest performing schools.

June 8, 2009

States Open to Charters Start Fast in 'Race to Top'

Emphasizing the need for additional effective education entrepreneurs to join the work of reforming America's lowest performing public schools, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan told reporters during a conference call this afternoon that states must be open to charter schools. Too much is at stake for states financially and for students academically to restrict choice and innovation.

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