Minority Science and Engineering Improvement Program
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October 2, 2014

U.S. Department of Education Invests Nearly $96 Million to Ensure All Students Have Same Opportunities to Learn, Achieve and Succeed

The U.S. Department of Education announced today nearly $96 million in grants to ensure every student—regardless of wealth, zip code, gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity or disability—has the same opportunities to learn and achieve.

September 18, 2013

Education Department Awards More Than $2.7 Million to 12 Colleges to Strengthen Minority Participation in STEM-Related Fields

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced that 12 colleges and universities that serve large minority populations will receive $2,748,619 in grants to strengthen education programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

April 27, 2012

$3.1 Million in Grants Awarded to Improve Science, Engineering Education at Predominantly Minority Institutions

The U.S. Department of Education today announced the award of 14 grants worth more than $3.1 million to promote long-range improvement in science and engineering education at predominantly minority institutions.

September 30, 2011

Education Department Awards Nearly $2.9 Million to Colleges and Universities to Strengthen Minority Participation in STEM-Related Fields

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced that 12 colleges and universities that serve large minority populations will receive $2,898,578 in grants to strengthen education programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

August 25, 2009

Secretary Duncan Awards $6.3 Million to Colleges and Universities to Strengthen Minority Participation in STEM-Related Employment

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced today that 32 colleges and universities have been awarded $6.3 million in grants to help underrepresented students earn doctoral degrees, strengthen science and engineering education, and better prepare students for careers in science and technology.

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