ParentCamp Goes to Washington!

Engaging families in schools and learning is vital to ensuring that all our kids get a world-class education. Which is why we’re excited to announce the first-ever ParentCampUSA at the Department’s headquarters on October 26.

ParentCamp is a free “un-conference” that brings together parents, caregivers, community leaders, educators, and children to have conversations about how we can best support our students.

ParentCamp found its roots at Knapp Elementary in Lansdale, Pennsylvania, when parents and educators came together to build relationships and create an opportunity to share great ideas from the field. Since 2010, school communities around the world have used the EdCamp and ParentCamp models to host their own events.

ParentCamp is about growing relationships and strengthening partnerships. It is about sharing, learning and networking. The focus is on what we ALL can do to make tomorrow better than today for our children.

The Department’s October 26, 2015 event will serve as a demonstration of how this type of “un-conference” model can be used to successfully engage families and communities in schools.

In typical ParentCamp fashion, discussions will be led by attendees who come from diverse backgrounds and neighborhoods, and who serve in a variety of roles in their educational community. To level the playing field, titles go out the window, and all voices are of equal value. Discussion leaders may begin the conversation and offer some initial resources, but it will be those in the room (and those following on social media) who will add the depth and much needed perspectives we need to improve outcomes for our nation’s children.

For those who cannot physically attend the October 26 event, there will be virtual options for participating and/or following along. In addition, the Department is planning regional ParentCamp events in cities across the country. We will share more on those proposed locations soon. If interested in hosting your own local ParentCamp simultaneously, you can find details on how to do so, on the main ParentCamp website, or by emailing ParentCamp founders Gwen Pescatore or Joe Mazza.

Find more details at the ParentCampUSA website.

Follow and connect on Twitter: #ParentCampUSA, @ParentCamp and @usedgov.

Start Now, to Start the School Year Right

Three children in the classroom.In communities and homes all across the country, change is in the air, and families are thinking about back-to-school season. There are lots of ways to gear up for a great school year.

Sometimes the whole neighborhood plays a part! For example, this past weekend, my hometown of Chicago hosted an 86-year tradition: the largest back-to-school parade in the country. Hundreds of students, parents, teachers and their neighbors took to the streets with marching bands, floats and special activities to celebrate the last few weeks of summer and get the word out about the new school year.


“Now is the time for parents and kids to start getting set for success in the classroom.”
Arne Duncan


But even if there’s no parade or back-to-school block party in your area, now is still a great time for parents and kids to start getting set for success in the classroom. Here are some things you can do now, and in the weeks ahead:

Start adjusting early. Start bringing meal times, bed times, and morning routines back in line with the school year schedule. Reading before bedtime, getting enough sleep, and having a reliable weekday routine: all these activities contribute to a student’s readiness to do well in school from day one.

Brush up on skills and complete any summer assignments. Take time together for refresher activities like practicing math facts or playing math games. Also, many schools send home summer activities, like math packets or reading lists, or post them on their website. Look through these together and make sure all assignments are completed.

Make a back-to-school to-do list, and start checking off tasks. With less than a month to go, create a plan to take care of everything that’s needed for a great first day of school. This includes scheduling any remaining health check-ups including dental and vision screenings, contacting the school with any questions, completing all necessary forms, taking care of any insurance, meal plan and enrollment requirements, as well as stocking up on supplies, clothes and other back-to-school gear.

Plan a learning adventure. Do something fun together that’s focused on learning, whether indoors or out: from a kitchen craft project or backyard science experiment, to a trip to the library or a museum. Our minds are like muscles: help get them warmed up for academic success.

Help to beautify your school. This month, many schools will host events to get their buildings looking great for the first day, from planting flowers and picking up trash in the schoolyard, to painting walls and cleaning classrooms. It’s a great way to learn about service together and help create a welcoming environment for the whole school community. If your school doesn’t have a beautification day, ask whether there other ways you can help teachers and school staff prepare.

Make space for study and creativity. Identify a quiet place for your child to do homework. Set aside space to post school schedules and assignments, classwork, art, projects, and report cards, as well as messages and milestones.

Set some clear, achievable goals for the year. By setting and meeting academic goals, students do more than improve their performance in school – they also gain confidence, motivation, and pride in their accomplishments. Help your child set some clear goals, like improving math or vocabulary, along with timeframes and clear steps for reaching them. Write them down, post them, and check progress regularly.

Get connected and stay in touch. Parents who are active and engaged with their child’s school are a key ingredient to helping their kids thrive. Here are just some things parents can do:

  • Reach out to your school, and get to know your child’s teachers. Let them know the best ways to contact you, and that you’re ready to work closely with them to help your child succeed.
  • Start a calendar for parent-teacher conferences and school events, and to check in regularly with your child’s teachers throughout the year.
  • Plan ways to keep track of your child’s subjects, grades and progress, help with homework, and provide support throughout the year. Agree to talk often together about what’s happening at school, what your child is learning, what she enjoys and where she might need help.
  • Consider serving on your local parent-teacher organization, or joining in other activities that help support great teaching and learning.
  • Check out our month-by-month toolkit at: www.ed.gov/parents/countdown-success

Talk about what to expect and focus on skills for life. Each student is different: some kids love back-to-school time; others have concerns or questions. Each new school year means transitions – to a new grade, classroom, or school building. In case of any back-to-school jitters: take time to remember the highlights from last year, and point out things to look forward to this year. As a parent, you can share memories of your own school experiences – including favorite teachers, field trips, subjects and activities – as well as lessons learned. Most of all, help your child build the skills that make for long-term success in life, like flexibility and open-mindedness, persistence, and a positive attitude.

Working together, parents and children can help make sure the new school year is filled with progress, achievement and the wonder of learning. Let’s make it a year worth celebrating, for every child.

Arne Duncan is U.S. Secretary of Education

Comencemos ahora para comenzar el año escolar bien

Three children in the classroom.

En las comunidades y hogares de todo el país, se siente el cambio en el aire, y las familias están pensando en el regreso a clases. Hay un montón de maneras de prepararse para un gran año escolar.

A veces todo el vecindario tiene un papel que jugar. Por ejemplo, este fin de semana pasado, mi ciudad natal de Chicago celebró una tradición de 86 años —el desfile de regreso a clases más grande del país. Cientos de estudiantes, padres, profesores y vecinos salieron a la calle con bandas de música, carrozas y actividades especiales para celebrar las últimas semanas del verano y anunciar el nuevo año escolar.


“Ahora es el momento para que padres y niños se empiecen a preparar para el éxito en el aula.”
Arne Duncan


Pero aun si no hay desfile o celebración de regreso a clases en su barrio, ahora todavía es un gran momento para que padres y chicos se preparen para el éxito en el aula. Aquí hay algunas cosas que usted puede hacer ahora, y en las próximas semanas:

Comience a hacer cambios. Comience a cambiar la hora de la comida, de ir a la cama, y rutina mañanera que sigue durante el año escolar. Leer antes de acostarse, dormir lo suficiente, y tener una rutina fiable de lunes a viernes, son las actividades que contribuyen para preparar al estudiante a triunfar en la escuela desde el primer día.

Afine las habilidades y complete cualquier tarea de verano. Pasen tiempo junto en actividades de perfeccionamiento, tal como practicar las tablas matemáticas y juegos de matemática. Además, muchas escuelas envían a casa actividades de aprendizaje durante el verano, incluso tareas de matemática y listas de lectura, o los cuelgan en su sitio web. Revisen juntos tales actividades y asegúrese de que todas las tareas se han completado.

Haga una lista de quehaceres para el regreso a la escuela, y empiece a tachar los ya cumplidos. Con menos de un mes para el regreso a clases, prepare un plan para hacer todo lo necesario para que su hijo esté completamente preparado el primer día de clases. Esto incluye programar chequeos de salud pendientes, incluyendo exámenes dentales y de visión; contactar a la escuela si tiene alguna pregunta, completar todos los formularios necesarios, obtener cualquier seguro requerido, planear la alimentación y requisitos de la matrícula, y abastecer todos los suministros, ropa y útiles escolares.

Planee una aventura de aprendizaje. Haga una actividad divertida que se enfoque en el aprendizaje, ya sea dentro o fuera de casa: tal como un proyecto de arte en la cocina o un experimento científico en el patio, hasta una excursión a la biblioteca o al museo. La mente es como los músculos, hay que ejercitarla (para que esté lista y fuerte) para el éxito académico.

Ayude a remozar su escuela. Este mes, muchas escuelas tendrán eventos para que las instalaciones se vean bien (estén limpias, lindas y listas) para el primer día de clases, desde sembrar flores en los jardines y recoger la basura del patio de la escuela, hasta pintar paredes, y limpiar las aulas. Es una gran manera de colaborar para crear un ambiente acogedor para toda la comunidad escolar. Si su escuela no tiene un día de mejoramiento, pregunte si hay otras maneras de ayudar a prepararse a los maestros y al personal de la escuela.

Haga un espacio para el estudio y la creatividad. Escoja un lugar tranquilo para que su hijo haga las tareas. Separe un espacio para colgar los horarios escolares y tareas, trabajos de clase, arte, proyectos y calificaciones, así como los mensajes y logros.

Ponga metas claras y realistas para el año. Cuando se les ponen metas académicas, los estudiantes hacen más que mejorar su rendimiento académico, y ganan confianza, motivación y orgullo en sus logros. Ayude a su hijo a establecer objetivos claros, tal como mejorar en matemática o en vocabulario, junto con plazos y pasos claros para lograrlos. Escríbalas, cuélguelas, y mida el progreso con regularidad.

Conéctese y manténgase en contacto. Los padres que se involucran activamente en la escuela son un ingrediente clave para ayudar a que sus hijos prosperen. Éstas son sólo algunas cosas que los padres pueden hacer:

  • Visite la escuela y conozca los maestrosde su hijo. Dígales cómo pueden contactarse con usted y que usted está listo para colaborar apegado con ellos en la educación y el éxito de su hijo.
  • Establezca un calendario para reuniones entre padres y maestros, eventos escolares, y para hablar a menudo con los maestros de su hijo durante todo el año.
  • Haga un plan par dar seguimiento a las asignaturas, las calificaciones y el progreso de su hijo, ayúdele con la tarea, y déle apoyo durante todo el año. Hablen con frecuencia juntos sobre lo que pasa en la escuela, lo que su hijo está aprendiendo, lo que le gusta y en qué necesite ayuda.
  • Considere servir en su organización local de padres y maestros, o participe en otras actividades que den apoyo a la buena enseñanza y aprendizaje.
  • Revise nuestra guía de mes a mes en: ed.gov/parents/countdown-success.

Hable sobre las expectativas y céntrese en las destrezas de por vida. Cada estudiante es diferente, ya que a algunos niños les encanta la temporada de regresar a la escuela, mientras otros tienen preocupaciones o preguntas. Cada nuevo año escolar es una transición —a un nuevo grado, aula, o edificio de la escuela. En caso de nerviosismo por el regreso a la escuela, tome tiempo para recordar los aspectos más destacados del año pasado, y señale las cosas buenas que vendrán con el nuevo año. Como padre, usted puede compartir los recuerdos de sus propias experiencias escolares, incluido sus maestros favoritos, excursiones, asignaturas, actividades, y lecciones aprendidas. Sobre todo, ayude a su niño a adquirir las habilidades necesarias para el éxito duradero en la vida, tal como ser flexible y mantener una mente abierta, persistente, y tener una actitud positiva.

Trabajando juntos, padres y niños, pueden ayudar a asegurar que el nuevo año escolar esté lleno de progreso, aprovechamiento y lleno de las maravillas del aprendizaje. Hagamos que sea un año que valga la pena celebrarlo para todos los niños.

Arne Duncan es el secretario de Educación de EE.UU.

Una nueva guía para padres habilita la participación de las familias en la educación

Como padre de dos niños en las escuelas públicas, aprecio que las escuelas me informan con frecuencia sobre el progreso de mis hijos — a menudo hasta una vez por semana. Pero aun así a veces me pregunto cuál es el nivel de mis hijos en comparación con otros niños de su edad en el distrito, estado y país. Y aun como empleado del Departamento de Educación, no siempre sé cuáles preguntas debo hacer.

20150716-SPANISH-Parent-Check-List

Por esta razón estoy contento por la nueva guía para padres que hoy lanzamos en colaboración con America Achieves, el Consejo Nacional de La Raza, National PTA, y el United Negro College Fund. La guía incluye preguntas que los padres deben hacer y recursos que pueden utilizar los padres y cuidadores para asegurar que sus niños reciban la educación que merecen. La guía sugiere preguntas importantes que hacer, consejos para el éxito educativo y recursos para obtener más información.

La guía complementa el conjunto de derechos que el Departamento publicó recientemente, donde se expone lo que las familias deben esperar de la educación de sus hijos. Los derechos se aplican a toda la trayectoria educativa y cubren todos los niveles educativos, incluido el acceso a una educación preescolar de calidad; escuelas primarias y secundarias seguras, con buenos recursos y normas altas de rendimiento para los estudiantes; y acceso a una educación universitaria de calidad a un precio asequible.

La guía sugiere las siguientes “preguntas básicas” que los padres deben plantear a los educadores de sus hijos, incluyendo:

Calidad: ¿Recibe mi hijo una buena educación?

  • ¿Cómo me mantendrán ustedes regularmente informado sobre el progreso de mi hijo? ¿Cómo podemos colaborar juntos si mi hijo se retrasa?
  • ¿Está mi hijo a nivel de grado y en camino de preparación para la universidad y el trabajo? ¿Cómo lo sabré?

Listos para el éxito: ¿Estará mi hijo preparado para triunfar en el futuro?

  • ¿Cómo se medirá el progreso y la capacidad de mi hijo en materias como lectura, matemática, ciencia, artes, desarrollo social y emocional, y otras actividades y materias?
  • ¿Cuánto tiempo pasará mi hijo preparándose y tomando pruebas del estado y del distrito? ¿Cómo sabré yo y el maestro de mi hijo cómo utilizar los resultados para ayudar a mi hijo a avanzar?

Seguros y saludables: ¿Se cuida y mantiene seguro a mi hijo en la escuela?

  • ¿Qué programas existen para que la escuela sea un entorno seguro, enriquecedor y positivo? ¿Cuáles son las políticas de la escuela sobre la disciplina y para evitar el acoso en la escuela?
  • ¿Son saludables las comidas y meriendas proporcionadas en la escuela? ¿Cuánto tiempo se dedica al recreo o el ejercicio?

Buenos maestros: ¿Participa y aprende mi hijo en la escuela cada día?

  • ¿Cómo sabré si los maestros de mi hijo son eficaces?
  • ¿Cuánto tiempo pasan los maestros colaborando entre sí?
  • ¿Qué tipo de desarrollo profesional hay para los maestros aquí?

Equidad y justicia: ¿Tienen mi hijo y los demás niños de la escuela o programa, la misma oportunidad de triunfar y de ser tratados justamente?

  • Cómo asegura la escuela que todos los estudiantes reciban un trato justo? (Por ejemplo, ¿existen diferencias en las tasas de suspensión o expulsión por raza o sexo?).
  • ¿Ofrece la escuela a todos los estudiantes acceso a las clases que necesitan para prepararse para el éxito, incluidos los estudiantes de inglés y los estudiantes con necesidades especiales (por ejemplo, Álgebra I y II, clases para dotados y talentosos, laboratorios de ciencia, clases AP o IB, arte, y música)?

Guíese por la guía.

Cameron Brenchley es subsecretario adjunto de comunicaciones en el Departamento de Educación de EE.UU.

New Parent Checklist Empowers Families

As a parent of two children in public schools, I appreciate how often I get updates on how they’re doing in school—sometimes as often as once a week! But it often leaves me wondering how my kids are stacking up against other kids their age in the district, state and country. And even as an employee at the Department of Education, I’m not always sure what questions I should be asking.

20150716-Parent-Check-List

This is why I’m excited about a new parent checklist we’re releasing today in collaboration with America Achieves, National Council of La Raza, National PTA, and the United Negro College Fund. The parent checklist includes questions and resources that parents and caregivers can use to help ensure their children are getting the education they deserve. The checklist suggests key questions, tips for educational success and resources for more information.

The checklist follows the set of rights that the Department recently released outlining what families should be able to expect for their children’s education. The rights follow the educational journey of a student—from access to quality preschool; to engagement in safe, well-resourced elementary and secondary schools that hold all students to high standards; to access to an affordable, quality college degree.

The checklist suggests these “key questions” that parents should pose to their child’s educators, including:

Quality: Is my child getting a great education?

  • How will you keep me informed about how my child is doing on a regular basis? How can we work together if my child falls behind?
  • Is my child on grade level, and on track to be ready for college and a career? How do I know?

Ready for Success: Will my child be prepared to succeed in whatever comes next?

  • How will you measure my child’s progress and ability in subjects including reading, math, science, the arts, social and emotional development, and other activities?
  • How much time will my child spend preparing for and taking state and district tests? How will my child’s teacher and I know how to use the results to help my child make progress?

Safe and Healthy: Is my child safe and cared for at school?

  • What programs are in place to ensure that the school is a safe, nurturing and positive environment? What are the discipline and bullying policies at the school?
  • Are the meals and snacks provided healthy? How much time is there for recess and/or exercise?

Great Teachers: Is my child engaged and learning every day?

  • How do I know my child’s teachers are effective?
  • How much time do teachers get to collaborate with one another?
  • What kind of professional development is available to teachers here?

Equity and Fairness: Does my child, and every child at my child’s school or program, have the opportunity to succeed and be treated fairly?

  • How does the school make sure that all students are treated fairly? (For example, are there any differences in suspension/expulsion rates by race or gender?)
  • Does the school offer all students access to the classes they need to prepare them for success, including English language learners and students with special needs (for example, Algebra I and II, gifted and talented classes, science labs, AP or IB classes, art, music)?

Check out the checklist for yourself.

Cameron Brenchley is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Communications at the U.S. Department of Education

La voz de los padres es esencial en la educación

Los padres son un ingrediente imprescindible de la educación. Los padres pueden ser la voz de grandes expectativas para los niños y para apoyar a los educadores en la creación de escuelas donde todos los niños reciban lo que necesitan para tener éxito. Una excelente educación es un derecho civil de cada niño; y mientras que nuestra nación ha dado grandes pasos, incluido una tasa récord de graduación de escuela secundaria, y asistencia a la universidad en máximos históricos, tenemos mucho camino por recorrer para asegurar que todos los niños tengan las mismas oportunidades de aprender.

Los padres pueden desempeñar un papel clave en exigir una educación de clase mundial para sus hijos, como se merecen. Pero, para muchos padres y familias puede ser una tarea incierta determinar cuál es la mejor manera de apoyar a sus hijos o qué preguntas deben hacer para asegurar que sus hijos aprendan y se desarrollen.

Por eso hoy, hablando desde el punto de vista de un padre de dos niños pequeños, el secretario Arne Duncan describió un conjunto de derechos educativos que debe tener cada familia en Estados Unidos, durante su discurso en la Convención Nacional de la PTA en Charlotte, Carolina del Norte. Este conjunto de tres derechos fundamentales que tienen las familias puede unir a todos los que trabajan para asegurar que los estudiantes estén preparados para prosperar en la escuela y en la vida. Estos derechos acompañan la trayectoria educativa del estudiante, incluido el acceso a la educación preescolar de calidad; la participación en escuelas primarias y secundarias seguras, dotadas con buenos recursos, y que requieren un alto nivel de todos los estudiantes; y acceso a una educación superior de calidad a precio asequible.

DoE-Declaración-de-Derechos-de-los-Padres-v2-3

Los padres y las familias pueden usar estos elementos básicos y necesarios de una excelente educación para construir relaciones más profundas con los educadores, administradores y líderes de la comunidad en apoyo de las escuelas, para que estos derechos se conviertan en realidad. Durante la Convención, el secretario Duncan también declaró su esperanza de que los padres le pidan cuentas a los funcionarios electos y los demás responsables, para acelerar el progreso en la educación y ampliar las oportunidades a más niños, especialmente los más vulnerables de nuestra nación.

Las declaraciones del secretario Duncan sobre este conjunto de derechos complementa el trabajo del Departamento de Educación para llegar a los padres, incluido la iniciativa Marco de desarrollo de capacidad dual para establecer alianzas entre las familias y las escuelas, presentada el año pasado; las herramientas que pueden ayudar a las familias y los estudiantes a seleccionar la universidad más adecuada para ellos; y el apoyo de los Centros de Capacitación e Información para Padres, y otros centros de recursos.

Durante su estancia en Charlotte, el secretario Duncan también participó en el panel “Escuelas Preparadas para el Futuro” (Future Ready Schools) para enfatizar la importancia de integrar la tecnología en el aula, sobre todo como una herramienta para promover la equidad para todos los estudiantes.

Para aprender más sobre los derechos que el secretario Duncan discutió hoy y para encontrar otros recursos para padres y familias, visite la página web del Departamento: Participación Familiar y Comunitaria. También considere unirse al secretario Duncan en una charla en Twitter para continuar el diálogo sobre la participación de los padres en la educación, que se celebrará el 1 de julio a las 1:30 p.m., hora del este, usando #PTChat.

Tiffany Taber es la jefa de personal para Desarrollo de Comunicaciones en el Departamento de Educación de EE.UU.

The Critical Voice of Parents in Education

Parents are critical assets in education. Parents can be a voice for high expectations for children and for supporting educators in creating schools where all children receive what they need to succeed. An excellent education is every child’s civil right; and while our nation has made great strides—with a record high school graduation rate and college enrollment at all-time highs—we have much further to go to ensure that every child has equal opportunity to learn.

Parents can play a key role in demanding the world-class education that their children deserve. But, for many parents and families, it can be an uncertain task determining the best ways to support their children or the right questions to ask to ensure their children are learning and growing.

That’s why, today, speaking from the perspective of a father of two young children, Secretary Arne Duncan described a set of educational rights that should belong to every family in America in a speech at the National PTA Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina. This set of three foundational family rights can unite everyone who works to ensure that students are prepared to thrive in school and in life. These rights follow the educational journey of a student—from access to quality preschool; to engagement in safe, well-resourced elementary and secondary schools that hold all students to high standards; to access to an affordable, quality college degree.

DoE-Foundational-Family-Rights-v2-6

Parents and families can use these basic—but necessary—elements of an excellent education to build deeper relationships with educators, administrators, and community leaders to support schools so that these rights become realities. At the Convention, Secretary Duncan also noted his hope that parents will hold elected officials and others accountable for accelerating progress in education and expanding opportunity to more children—particularly our nation’s most vulnerable.

Secretary Duncan’s discussion of this set of rights complements work by the Education Department to reach out to parents—from the Dual Capacity-Building Framework for Family-School Partnerships released last year, to tools that can help families and students select the best colleges for their needs, to support of Parent Training and Information Centers and resource hubs.

While in Charlotte, Secretary Duncan also participated in a “Future Ready Schools” panel to emphasize the importance of integrating technology into the classroom, especially as a tool for promoting equity for all students.

To learn more about the rights that Secretary Duncan discussed today and to find other resources for parents and families, visit the Department’s Family and Community Engagement page. And, consider joining Secretary Duncan in a Twitter chat to continue the dialogue about parent involvement in education on July 1 at 1:30 p.m., ET, using #PTChat.

Tiffany Taber is Chief of Staff for Communications Development at the U.S. Department of Education

Privacy & Transparency: New Resources for Schools and Districts

We all know how important it is for parents to have open lines of communication with their children’s school. Parents want to be champions for their children and to protect their interests and to do this they need information. When it comes to information that is stored digitally, parents often ask questions such as:

  • What information are you collecting about my child?
  • Why do you need that information, and what do you use it for?
  • How do you safeguard my child’s information?

I’m pleased to announce the release of new Privacy Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) guidance regarding transparency best practices for schools and districts. This document provides a number of recommendations for keeping parents and students informed about schools’ and districts’ collection and use of student data.

The recommendations can be divided into three main categories: what information schools and districts ought to communicate to parents; how to convey that information in an understandable way; and how to respond to parent inquiries about student data policies and practices.

Some of the best practices covered in the document include:

  • making information about student data policies and practices easy to find on districts’ and schools’ public webpages
  • publishing a data inventory that details what information schools and districts collect about students, and what they use it for
  • explaining to parents what, if any, personal information is shared with third parties and for what purposes
  • using communication strategies that reduce the complexity of the information, and telling parents where they can get more detailed information if they want it.

The document also encourages schools and districts to be proactive when it comes to communicating about how they use student data.

We’re also pleased to direct you to the new website for our FERPA compliance office, the Family Policy Compliance Office, or FPCO. The new website is more user-friendly and will help school officials, parents, and students find the information they are looking for. It’s still a work in progress and we have many new features that we hope to launch in the coming weeks. We will soon begin posting FPCO’s decision letters from prior complaints and we will be launching an online community of practice for school officials to share information, templates, and lessons learned.

Kathleen M. Styles is Chief Privacy Officer at the U.S. Department of Education.

El Departamento de Educación publica el Proyecto para la Participación de los Padres y la Comunidad

El cuarto trimestre del año escolar es generalmente un tiempo de preparación en las escuelas y distritos, ya que se planifican los presupuestos, los horarios escolares, y el desarrollo profesional para el próximo año. En este período de preparación, es importante que las escuelas y distritos discutan cómo apoyar a los padres y a la comunidad para que puedan contribuir al éxito estudiantil.

Para ayudar en esta labor, el Departamento de Educación de EE.UU. se enorgullece en presentar su proyecto para que las escuelas y las comunidades puedan promover la participación de los padres y la comunidad. fce-frameworkEn nuestro país, menos del 25 por ciento de los residentes son menores de 18 años[1], y todos tenemos la responsabilidad de ayudar a que las escuelas tengan éxito. El proyecto de Capacidad Dual es un proceso que muestra a las escuelas y al personal de los distritos cómo promover de manera eficaz la participación de los padres en las escuelas para aumentar el rendimiento estudiantil, y también proporciona un modelo que las escuelas y los distritos pueden utilizar para fomentar la participación de la comunidad, y para que las escuelas sean el centro de nuestras comunidades.

En mi ciudad natal de Baltimore hay un buen ejemplo de cómo los elementos del proyecto pueden conducir a mejorar la participación. Las Escuelas Públicas de la Ciudad de Baltimore dio apoyo a 12,000 hogares con niños en kindergarten y preescolar para involucrar a las familias en las prácticas de alfabetización en el hogar. Cada semana los estudiantes recibieron una bolsa con diferentes libros infantiles galardonados. Así, los niños leyeron aproximadamente 100 libros durante el año. Además de la repartición de libros, también se dio información de capacitación a los padres y cómo compartir los libros para promover la alfabetización en la primera infancia y fomentar el amor por el aprendizaje. Con el programa, las familias también se conectan con las bibliotecas públicas y escolares. Al concluir el programa, los niños reciben su propia bolsa para guardar sus libros y continuar la práctica de préstamo de libros y el hábito de la lectura.

Para obtener más información sobre el Proyecto de Capacidad Dual, y un video presentado por el secretario de Educación, Arne Duncan, por favor revise detenidamente nuestro sitio web, http://www.ed.gov/family-and-community-engagement. En los próximos meses, proporcionaremos recursos e información adicional para que las escuelas, distritos, comunidades y padres puedan aprender más sobre cómo participar en la educación, y cómo compartir la maravillosa labor que desarrolla la capacidad de los padres, escuelas y la comunidad en el apoyo a todos los estudiantes.

Jonathan Brice, subsecretario, Oficina de Educación Primaria y Secundaria, Departamento de Educación de EE.UU.


[1] http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=PEP_2012_PEPAGESEX&prodType=table

Department of Education Releases New Parent and Community Engagement Framework

The fourth quarter of the school year is generally a time of preparation for schools and districts as they finalize next year’s budget, student and teacher schedules, and professional development for the upcoming school year. During this time of preparation, it is important that schools and districts discuss ways that they can support parents and the community in helping students to achieve success.

fce-framework graphicTo help in this work, the U.S. Department of Education is proud to release a framework for schools and the broader communities they serve to build parent and community engagement. Across the country, less than a quarter of residents are 18 years old or younger, and all of us have a responsibility for helping our schools succeed. The Dual Capacity framework, a process used to teach school and district staff to effectively engage parents and for parents to work successfully with the schools to increase student achievement, provides a model that schools and districts can use to build the type of effective community engagement that will make schools the center of our communities.

An example of how the elements of the framework can lead to improved engagement is exhibited in my hometown of Baltimore. Baltimore City Public Schools worked to support 12,000 pre-kindergarten and kindergarten homes, and to engage families in home-based literacy practices. Each week students received a different bag filled with award-winning children’s books, exposing children, on average, to more than 100 books per year. The book rotation also includes parent training and information on how to share books effectively to promote children’s early literacy skills and nurture a love of learning. Through the program, families are also connected with their local public and school libraries. At the culmination of the program, children receive a permanent bag to keep and continue the practice of borrowing books and building a lifelong habit of reading.

For more information on the Dual Capacity Framework, as well as an introductory video from Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, please take some time and review our website at www.ed.gov/family-and-community-engagement. In the coming months, we will provided additional resources and information, so that schools, districts, communities, and parents can learn more about family and community engagement, as well as, share the wonderful work they are doing to build parent, school, and community capacity that supports all students.

Read a Spanish version of this post.

Jonathan Brice is deputy assistant secretary in the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Elementary and Secondary Education

Stopping the Summer Slide

Summer is the perfect time for students of all ages to relax, but it’s also a time when summer learning loss can occur. This learning loss is called the “summer slide,” and happens when children do not engage in educational activities during the summer months.

Let's Read Event

Members of the Washington Kastles get kids moving during the Department of Education’s annual Let’s Read, Let’s Move event. The events focus on keeping children’s minds and bodies active during the summer.

While summer vacation is months away, many parents are starting to plan for summer now. As you’re thinking about your plans for the upcoming summer break, we’ve gathered a few ideas and activities that you and your children – no matter their ages – can complete throughout the summer.

For Elementary and Middle School Students:

  • Parents of younger students can create a summer reading list with their children, and then reward them when they finish each book.
  • Additionally, parents can encourage their kids to think outside of the box with arts and crafts. Sites such as kids.gov and NGA Kids have great ideas that will let any child’s imagination run wild and stimulate creativity.
  • Summertime can be a great time to teach healthy eating habits. Parents can get ideas for tasty and nutritious meals at Let’s Move! and kidshealth.org. There is also information available about the USDA Summer Food Program, which was established to ensure that low-income children continue to receive nutritious meals when school is not in session.

For High School Students:

  • Summer can be the perfect time for high school-aged children to prepare for college, and setting aside at least one day a week to keep math and science skills fresh is an excellent way to start off the summer. Local libraries are an excellent place to find books full of practice problems – and they’re quiet and often air-conditioned too!
  • Summer is also a good time to sit down and discuss financial aid and other expenses. Our Office of Federal Student Aid has prepared checklists geared toward students of all ages.
  • Many high school students might also want to take the time to start developing their professional resumes. Finding a part-time job can help students gain valuable experience and line their pockets with a bit of extra cash.  Visit www.wh.gov/youthjobs for more information.
  • Volunteering is also an option. Youth-oriented summer camps, local museums, animal shelters and, of course, libraries are often looking for extra help during warmer months. This experience is not only valuable for personal and professional development, but it often looks good on college applications. Find opportunities at volunteer.gov.

Share your own summer tips and resources with the hashtag #SummerSuccess on Twitter, and look for more information from the U.S. Department of Education in the coming months as we count down to Summer Learning Day on Friday, June 20.

Dorothy Amatucci is a new media analyst in the Office of Communications and Outreach

Taking Time to Talk with Your Child about Tests

Assessments are part of life at school, but they don’t have to be a source of stress. Helping your child prepare properly for an exam is important, and the conversation doesn’t have to stop after the test is complete.

PencilsBelow are some tips parents might consider discussing with their child:

  • Let your child know that you are proud of his/her achievements and together you will work on troublesome subject matter.
  • Learn about the type of tests the classroom teacher is using to prepare the children for the tests.
  • Learn about the type of tests the school, district, and state are using to measure the achievement of your child.
  • Find the school, district, or state website for information on the test. Samples of previous tests given may also be found at the website.  Use as practice items for your child to prepare them.
  • Be familiar with the terms used on the test (such as proficient, percentile, and norm-referenced) and be prepared to ask what those terms mean when talking with the classroom teacher, counselor, or principal.
  • If needed, schedule a meeting with the teacher to discuss your child’s test results.
  • Ask your child’s teacher for tips and ideas about working with your child at home. Are there specific packets or materials available that will help your child improve?
  • Ask the teacher if a private tutor might be available. Are there resources the teacher can provide?
  • Create a plan with the teacher to periodically check on your child’s progress in deficient areas.

Involvement before and after any test can help children achieve their goals in the 21st century classroom.

Check out our Parent Power booklet for more information. Additional practice information can be found at the NCES Kids’ Zone.

Carrie Jasper is director of outreach to parents and families at the U.S. Department of Education