Bullying Rates Drop

Bullying remains a serious issue for students and their families, and efforts to reduce bullying concern policy makers, administrators, and educators. According to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, “As schools become safer, students are better able to thrive academically and socially. The Department, along with our federal partners and others, has been deeply involved in the fight against bullying in our nation’s schools.” This is why we are so pleased to share that, after remaining virtually unchanged for close to a decade, new data indicate that the prevalence of bullying is at a record low.

According to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics latest School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey, in 2013, the reported prevalence of bullying among students ages 12 to 18 dropped to 22 percent after remaining stubbornly around 28 percent since 2005.

“The report brings welcome news,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell said.  “Parents, teachers, health providers, community members and young people are clearly making a difference by taking action and sending the message that bullying is not acceptable. We will continue to do our part at HHS to help ensure every child has the opportunity to live, learn and grow in a community free of bullying.”

Bullying can occur anywhere and to any student. There are three types of bullying: physical, relational (or social) and verbal. Research shows that students who are bullied are more likely to struggle in school and skip class. They are more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol, be depressed, and are at higher risk of suicide.

Since 2010, the Department of Education along with the Departments of Health and Human Services and Justice, have acted to combat bullying and cyberbullying through work such as StopBullying.gov. However, it is the work of educators, bus drivers, parents, and students, that have taken a stand to put an end to bullying. Your hard work and dedication is making a difference!

To learn about bullying and how to take action to end bullying, please visit StopBullying.gov and join the conversation on the StopBullying.gov Facebook page!

Sarah Sisaye is a Management and Program Analyst in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education

Can Students Conduct Real-Life Science Experiments?

Today, science education reaches beyond paper and pencil to explore principles in action as never before. Students’ ability to perform investigations, draw valid conclusions, and explain outcomes translates into critical life skills.

Nation's Report Card logoTomorrow, National Center for Educational Statistics Commissioner John Buckley and a panel of experts will discuss the results from a new generation of hands-on and computer tasks administered during the 2009 NAEP Science Assessment, and how those results shed light on student achievement in these areas.

You are invited to join the panel of experts to find out how fourth-, eighth-, and 12th-grade students performed when asked to manipulate multiple variables or engage in strategic decision-making; how often students engage in classroom science experiments and report-writing; and much more.

This event will take place within a unique interactive science exhibit hosted by Living Classrooms at the Foundry Lofts in Washington, D.C. Attend in person or via live webcast to review results, watch video of students conducting experiments from the assessment, and view simulations of interactive computer-based science tasks.

Watch the live release of the results June 19, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. ET.

To view the webcast, click here.

If you are in the Washington D.C. area, you can attend the release event in person at the Science + You Exhibit Space at The Foundry Lofts. Find directions to the event and register to attend in person here.

ED Releases New Report on Arts Education in U.S. Public Schools

On Monday, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), part of the U.S. Department of Education, released the findings of the first nationwide arts survey in a decade that comprehensively documents the state of arts education in U.S. public schools.

Arts Report Cover PhotoAt the announcement, Secretary Arne Duncan pointed to the importance of the report because it allows us to compare changes in arts education over time, and it’s the first survey that enables us to get a clear sense of how the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law has affected arts education.

“It’s a good news, bad news story,” according to Secretary Duncan.  On the one hand, there have not been significant national declines in the availability of music and visual arts instruction in elementary and secondary schools. However, for theater and dance in elementary schools, the percentages of schools making these art forms available went from 20 percent 10 years ago to only 4 and 3 percent, respectively, in the 2009-10 school year.  In addition, at more than 40 percent of secondary schools, coursework in arts was not required for graduation in the 2009-10 school year.

Most troubling is an “equity gap” between the availability of arts instruction as well as the richness of course offerings for students in low-poverty schools compared to those in high-poverty schools, leading students who are economically disadvantaged to not get the enrichment experiences of affluent students.

The Department of Education is tackling this equity gap by allowing states flexibility under NCLB, and through a competitive priority for the arts and humanities in the Promise Neighborhood competition.

“A well-rounded education is simply too vital to our students’ success to let the teaching of the arts and humanities erode,” Secretary Duncan concluded at the announcement.

Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999-2000 and 2009-10 is a product of the National Center for Education Statistics at the Institute of Education Sciences.

To view the full report please visit here, and click here to read Secretary Duncan’s prepared remarks.