Secretary Duncan: “Step Up and Fund Education”

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On Friday, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan visited Edwin M. Stanton Elementary in Philadelphia to highlight the need to support teachers and students by investing in our nation’s schools.

During the visit, Duncan joined U.S. Representative Chaka Fattah (D-PA), Superintendent of Philadelphia schools Dr. William Hite, and acting Pennsylvania Education Secretary Pedro Rivera for a community roundtable discussion. Neighborhood residents, parents and teachers talked about how the community came together to keep the small school from closing a few years prior.

Secretary Duncan highlighted the need for equitable education spending in states, and called on Pennsylvania to “step up and fund education.” Recent data shows that students from low-income families in 23 states are being shortchanged when it comes to state and local education funding. In these states, districts serving the highest percentage of students from low-income families are spending fewer state and local dollars per pupil than districts that have fewer students in poverty.

Secretary Duncan visited a Stanton classroom, where students were holding a mock trial for Goldilocks. (Photo credit: Joshua Hoover/U.S. Department of Education)

Secretary Duncan visited a Stanton classroom, where students were holding a mock trial for Goldilocks. (Photo credit: Joshua Hoover/U.S. Department of Education)

Twenty states also have school districts that spend fewer state and local dollars on districts with a high percentage of minority students, than they do on districts with fewer minority students.

The good news is that nothing is preventing these states from funding education more equitably, and they could quickly join the dozens of states that are ensuring that low-income students are getting the resources and support they need to succeed.

All of us have a role to play when it comes to ensuring that students from low-income families aren’t shortchanged. At the federal level, we’re ready to work with Congress to close the federal loophole that allows districts to allocate funds inequitably.

Recently, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan laid out his vision for a new Elementary and Secondary Education Act, including the idea that opportunity for every child needs to be part of our national conscience.

Read more about our recent data and watch highlights of the visit below:

New Grad Rate Data Show Gap Between Minority and White Students is Closing

New data out today show some positive signs in ensuring every student has the opportunity to succeed, no matter their zip code.

Between 2010-11 and 2012-13, the graduation rates for American Indian, black, and Hispanic students increased by nearly four percentage points over two years, outpacing the growth for all students. This also shows that the gap between minority and white students is closing.

Grad Data Chart
This exciting news is one more piece of evidence that America’s public schools are making important progress. America’s high school graduation rate is at a record high, dropout rates are down, and 1.1 million additional black and Hispanic students are attending college since 2008.

We still have work to do in improving educational opportunities for every student, but we are seeing incredible progress, and the credit for this progress goes to America’s educators, families, communities, and students. All of whom are working through major and sometimes challenging changes in our schools.

Help make sure that the good news in education gets attention, and tweet this exciting new grad rate graphic to your followers.

Read more about today’s release.

New Guidance to Help Protect Student Privacy in Educational Sites and Apps

When signing up for a new technology, digital service, or app, there’s a simple little check box near the end that most of us don’t give much thought. But for schools and districts, agreeing to a terms of service agreement could have big implications for student privacy.

Earlier today, the U.S. Department of Education released model terms of service guidance to help schools identify which online educational services and apps have strong privacy and data security policies to protect our students.

Some terms of service agreements are a tough read, even for lawyers, so the hope is that our new guidance will help school officials decide what’s right for their school and students.

Today’s guidance helps officials look for provisions that would allow the service or company to market to students or parents, provisions on how data is collected, used, shared, transferred, and destroyed, and it also guides schools on making sure they’re satisfying parental access requirements, as well as proper security controls.

Read the entire guidance here, and check out the training video below:

Learn more about student privacy by visiting the Department of Education’s Privacy Technical Assistance Center.

It’s Time for Equitable Spending of State and Local Dollars

We believe that every child should receive a strong education that prepares him or her for success in college, careers, and life.

It shouldn’t matter what a child looks like, how much his or her parent makes, or what zip code they live in; all students should be given the same opportunity and resources to achieve. However, because our country has long used local property taxes to fund schools, school funding is not spent at equal levels.


“In today’s world, we have to equip all our kids with an education that prepares them for success, regardless of what they look like, or how much their parents make, or the zip code they live in.”                                                                                                                                                         – President Obama


According to our latest data, students from low-income families in 23 states are being shortchanged when it comes to state and local education funding. In these states, districts serving the highest percentage of students from low-income families are spending fewer state and local dollars per pupil than districts that have fewer students in poverty.

Twenty states also have school districts that spend fewer state and local dollars on districts with a high percentage of minority students, than they do on districts with fewer minority students.

Our recent numbers looks specifically at spending inequalities between school districts, but we also know that in too many places, the spending problems are made worse by inequalities in spending between schools within districts. That’s why we need to close the “comparability loophole” in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) – to be sure that districts start with a level playing field so federal dollars go to their intended purpose of providing additional support for students who need it most.

Educators know that low-income students need extra resources and support to succeed, and the good news is that nothing is preventing states from correcting course and ensuring that all students are prepared to succeed. In fact, states like Indiana, Minnesota, New Jersey, and North Dakota are allocating money in a more equitable manner to help all students prepare for college and careers.

All of us have a role to play when it comes to ensuring that students from low-income families aren’t shortchanged. At the federal level, we’re ready to work with Congress to close the federal loophole that allows districts to allocate funds inequitably.

Recently, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan laid out his vision for a new Elementary and Secondary Education Act, including the idea that opportunity for every child needs to be part of our national conscience.

 

Related:

Creating a New Federal Education Law: Have you asked me?

As a Classroom Teaching Ambassador Fellow, I have the unique opportunity to view education through two perspectives—first, as a teacher in metro Atlanta and, second, as an employee of the U.S. Department of Education. Having the privilege to serve in this dual capacity comes with a great responsibility to question what I see every day in education and to share my truth.

With the proposed reauthorization for the nation’s education law—the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)—moving at light-speed in the world of policy, it left me wondering what my ESEA looks like.

ESEA was introduced in 1965, but most people know the law by the name it received in 2001 when it was updated—we call that renewal the No Child Left Behind Act. There are two proposals to create a new ESEA in Congress right now—a bill from Congressman John Kline and a discussion draft of a bill from Senator Lamar Alexander. They are similar, and they have enormous implications for teachers.

I wonder what would happen if lawmakers had the courage to ask the people in the trenches what their ESEA would look like. Novel idea, right?

What are the thoughts of those educators who, day-in and day-out, cross thresholds into buildings where impressionable young minds are nurtured and supported? How would this law impact the people who spend hours pouring care, sowing seeds of inspiration, and imparting knowledge into our future leaders?

I wonder what would happen if lawmakers asked how teachers feel about the need for higher expectations. I wonder if they know my true feelings about rigorous, college- and career-ready academic standards and what it would look like if all of us stayed the course long enough to see results before cutting ties.

I wonder what would happen if we had the ability to leave the “this too shall pass” mentality behind and focus on results for kids. I wonder if policymakers think about the investment that states and districts have made—with taxpayer dollars—to try to implement standards that will catapult our students into a realm where they can easily compete with any student, anywhere. Imagine that.

My school is one where some students are homeless, and the attendance zone includes children who come from three drug rehabilitation centers as well as transitional housing centers. I wonder what would happen if my school was faced with losing Title I funds, which come from ESEA. The House bill on Capitol Hill right now cuts funding for education.

If we lost resources, would that mean that the extra teachers—who my principal hires to reduce class sizes and provide more concentrated interventions to our most vulnerable students—would be eliminated? The students with the greatest needs should receive the most resources. This is a simple truth.

I wonder, as a teacher and a parent, should high-quality early childhood education for all children be a luxury or the norm? Countless amounts of research show that the return on investment for early learning is huge. Yet, the benefits of providing all our children with access to quality early learning is yet to be realized in this country, and I wonder if proposals in Congress do enough to expand preschool opportunity.

All of these things matter. These are the reasons that I get up at 5:30 every morning to drive to Dunwoody Springs Elementary School. These are the reasons that I applied to be a Teaching Ambassador Fellow at the Department of Education. These things represent my colleagues, my students, and my own two beautiful, brown baby boys.

But I am just one voice, so we need to hear from you too. Tell us what your ESEA looks like. How does it affect you, your school, your class, or your child:

Your Name

Your Email

Your City and State

Tell us what your ESEA looks like:

 Sign me up for email updates

Note: Stories submitted through this web form along with your first name may be featured on ED.gov and may be posted on ED's social media channels.

ESEA reauthorization impacts us all. I hope that policymakers and others who are central to this effort will listen to educators, and what they hope will be in their version of a new ESEA—a law that takes into account their experiences, their truths, and that expands opportunity to all children.

Patrice Dawkins-Jackson is Teaching Ambassador Fellow who continues to serve from Dunwoody Springs Elementary School in Sandy Springs, GA.

Highlighting Success in Delaware

Howard HS of Technology

Students at Howard High School of Technology. (Official Department of Education Photo by Joshua Hoover)

Secretary Arne Duncan made several stops in Delaware yesterday to get a firsthand look at the incredible progress made in education throughout the state. Delaware’s graduation rate has gone up, and dropout rates are at a 30-year low. The state is also making huge investments in early education and has emerged as a national leader in making college more affordable for everyone.

His first stop was at Howard High School of Technology in Wilmington, a school that was really struggling when he visited the school with Vice President Biden four years ago. But thanks to key reforms put in place since then, the school has made significant strides. While acknowledging the school’s accomplishments, he underscored the need to keep moving forward.

“Long way to go, no one’s putting up a huge ‘mission accomplished’ banner, but… as I’ve seen in schools as I’ve traveled the nation, schools that historically have struggled, have seen significant turnarounds in a relatively short period of time,” he said.

While there, he met with Governor Jack Markell, Education Secretary Mark Murphy, and a group of teachers who are leading key efforts at their schools to transition to higher standards and better assessments.

Other stops included a visit to the Rotary Club in Wilmington, and a stop at Delaware Technical Community College in Stanton with Labor Secretary Tom Perez for a roundtable discussion with students and business leaders and a conversation about the President’s proposal to make two years of community college free for responsible students.

The trip was both an affirmation of the hard work being done, but also an opportunity to remind stakeholders that there is still much left to do. While recognizing the many challenges that come with implementing big and bold changes to education (such as college and career readiness), he strongly urged educators to persevere.


“The lessons here are really profound, and the progress is fantastic, but what happens here, I think has national implications,” he said.


Patrick Kerr is a member of the Communications Development division in the Office of Communications and Outreach

President Obama’s Weekly Address: Giving Every Child, Everywhere, a Fair Shot

In this week’s address, the President laid out his plan to ensure more children graduate from school fully prepared for college and a career.

Our elementary and secondary schools are doing better, as demonstrated by the news this past week that our high school graduation rate has hit an all-time high, but there is still more that can be done to ensure every child receives a quality education. That’s why the President wants to replace No Child Left Behind with a new law that addresses the overuse of standardized tests, makes a real investment in preschool, and gives every kid a fair shot at success.

He reminded everyone that when educating our kids, the future of our nation, we shouldn’t accept anything less than the best.

Learn More:

High School Graduation Rate Hits New Record High

The nation’s high school graduation rate hit 81 percent in 2012-13, which is the highest rate since states adopted a new uniform way of calculating grad rates five years ago.

Students In Graduation Gowns Showing Diplomas On CampusThe new record high is a really big deal, and it’s all thanks to the hard work of our country’s teachers, principals, students and families.

In a statement, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said “We can take pride as a nation in knowing that we’re seeing promising gains, including for students of color.”


“This is a vital step toward readiness for success in college and careers for every student in this country.”


Starting in 2010, states, districts and schools starting using a new, common metric called the adjusted cohort graduation rate. Before this, comparing graduation rates between states was often unreliable because of the different methods used. The new method is more accurate and helps states target support to ensure students are graduating on time and are college and career ready.

See the data here, including what the graduation rate is in your state. Check back in the coming weeks when we hope to release grad rates for minority students, students with disabilities, and English language learners.

Of course, although this progress is a big milestone, we can’t slow down now. Learn how the Obama Administration is working to maintain and accelerate progress and opportunity through an overhaul of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

 

Tell Us How The Budget Affects You


“Budgets aren’t just about numbers, they reflect our values.”
– Secretary Arne Duncan


Earlier this week, President Obama sent his Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 budget proposal to Congress. We know that you’re busy, and you may not have had the chance to dig through the details of the budget. For us, the big takeaway is that the budget request demonstrates the Obama Administration’s commitment to education as a means to strengthen America’s middle class, help hard-working families, and ensure that every child has the opportunity to fulfill his or her greatest potential.

Why Budgets Matter

This week’s budget announcement is a big deal for teachers, parents, and students. In fact, if you’re like the President and our team at the Department of Education, you probably believe that education is at the core of a successful and economically competitive America.

Find out what the President’s budget means for education.

Tell Us Your Story

In the coming weeks, Secretary Duncan will testify before Congress on the President’s budget proposal, but before he goes, he wants to hear from you. In the form below, tell us what the budget means for you, so he can share that message when he testifies before Congress.

Your Name

Your Email

Your City and State

How do budgets affect you:

 Sign me up for email updates

Note: Stories submitted through this web form along with your first name may be featured on ED.gov and may be posted on ED's social media channels.

We know that at schools around the country, dollars are stretched thin, and that every penny in education makes a difference. That’s why budgets are important. They reflect our belief that education is at the core of what makes our country great.

Resources:

Your Federal Budget Cheat Sheet

Earlier today, President Obama sent his Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 budget proposal to Congress. In Washington, words like “appropriations” “budget outlays” and “authorizations” are quite popular during the budget season. Yet we know that America’s educators are hard at work, and may not have the time to tune in to CSPAN to keep up with the budget process. So consider this your federal budget cheat sheet.

The President’s Proposal

B82qQQDCYAI8_5U520On the first Monday in February, the President sends his budget proposal for the next fiscal year (which starts on October 1) to Congress. The President’s Budget reflects his and his Administration’s priorities, and begins the budget process.

In the weeks after receiving the President’s proposal, Congress holds hearings to receive testimony on the Budget proposal from a wide range of officials, experts and the public.  The committees then send the Budget Committees their ‘‘views and estimates’’ on appropriate spending or revenue levels for the programs included in the Budget.

Budget Resolution

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Email from Secretary Duncan: Why I’ll Be Watching Tonight

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Earlier today, Secretary Arne Duncan sent the following message to ED’s email list to let them know why he’ll be watching tonight’s State of the Union address. Didn’t get it? Sign up for email updates here.


Tonight, President Obama will deliver his sixth State of the Union address to the country.

In his past five addresses, the President has discussed big ideas to strengthen education, and to support and celebrate teachers, students, and parents.

There’s good reason the President devotes so much of his annual address to education. We have a lot to be proud of. The graduation rate is at its highest level, for the first time, four out of five students are completing high school on time, and a million more black and Hispanic students in college.

But we still have important work to do. America is at an educational crossroads, and we must ensure we are moving forward not back. We must recognize that educational opportunity is a national priority, and that equity and excellence matter more than ever.

Watch tonight to learn more about the President’s ideas on supporting success for America’s students.

Join me in watching the State of the Union, tonight at 9 p.m. ET. Visit wh.gov/SOTU to watch an enhanced version of the speech, and follow @USEdGov on Twitter for live updates.

Arne

Improving American Education Is Not Optional

Yesterday, the Washington Post ran an op-ed by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan on the choices our country faces in replacing the Elementary and Secondary Act (ESEA), and also known as No Child Left Behind. Interested in getting ESEA updates in your inbox? Sign up for email updates


On consecutive days this week, the United States was introduced to two very different visions for its most important education law. Quite soon, Congress will choose between them, and while the legislation could move fast enough to escape wide public notice, its consequences will be profound.

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) stands as a statement that a high-quality education for every single child is a national interest and a civil right. The law has boosted funding for schools in low-income neighborhoods, put books in libraries and helped ensure that minorities, students with disabilities, those learning English, those living in poverty and others who have struggled would not slip through the cracks.

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