Six Months of PROGRESS

Six months ago, the Department of Education launched a new blog, PROGRESS, to highlight innovative ideas, promising practices, and lessons learned through K-12 education reforms across the country.

Incredible work is happening throughout the U.S. in schools, districts, and states to improve teaching and learning, and, as Secretary Duncan has pointed out, the best ideas do not come from Washington, but from individuals in the field working to improve outcomes for students.

PROGRESS has focused on showcasing the exciting transformations that are taking place in classrooms and communities from the perspective of students, teachers, principals, and local leaders on the ground. It has featured states and districts that are actively preparing their students for college and careers upon graduation, ensuring that educators are receiving the kind of high-quality support and opportunities they need to be effective, and transforming systems and structures so that every student can succeed.

For example, over the past six months, PROGRESS has explored how states like Kentucky and Massachusetts are promoting college and career readiness for their students; Colorado and the District of Columbia are involving teachers in the creation of new, more rigorous curricula and empowering teacher leaders to guide change in their districts; Delaware, Tennessee, and institutions of higher education in California are building more effective teacher and leader preparation and career pathways; districts in Florida and Maryland are providing opportunities for students to explore STEM fields; Hawaii and Delaware are using data systems to support instruction;  Baltimore City is engaging its communities and parents to transform schools; and Ohio is making strides to improve its lowest-performing schools.

In the coming weeks, you’ll also be able to read about Rhode Island’s efforts to recognize and bolster the impact that support professionals are making on student achievement. You’ll also learn about Florida’s rigorous job-embedded principal preparation programs, a New York district’s effort to engage parents in their quest to raise standards in their classrooms, and much more.  Stay tuned!

We are excited and encouraged to celebrate the progress that teachers, students, schools, and school systems are making every day.  To stay updated on these efforts, sign up for email updates from PROGRESS or visit us at www.ed.gov/edblogs/progress.

PROGRESS is always looking for great examples of reform in action from the field.  If you have an idea that you would like to share with us, please email us at progress@ed.gov.

1 Comment

  1. If STEM teachers don’t know STEM themselves, they can’t educate young minds about STEM. If the teachers only learn superficial fun stuff at university workshops, they can’t really teach STEM.
    If young minds are not allowed to interact with people who actually worked in these fields because of rules, state standards and pedagogy requirements, the children won’t learn STEM at a deep enough level.
    It is fiction to believe that playing with toys and teaching kids how to solder with prepare them for high paying STEM jobs.
    People with decades of experience as contractors, consultants and engineers are prevented from teaching these young minds if they don’t score high enough on timed, academic, Praxis tests that have little to do with STEM. So the right teachers never arrive in the classroom and if they do, they don’t fit in with the teaching culture that is full of non-STEM people posing as STEM teachers.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *