16 University Museums Showcase the Work of Their Youngest Students

Reposted from the OII Blog.

studentart

Student artists from 16 academic museums officially open the exhibit of their works with a ribbon cutting at ED. (Photo credit: U.S. Department of Education)

On July 23, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) hosted the grand opening of the student art exhibit Museums: pARTners in Learning at its headquarters in Washington, presenting visual artwork and creative writing by students ages 5–17 in the arts education programs at 16 academic museums.

Deputy Under Secretary Jamie Studley welcomed guests to the Department and thanked the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) for its partnership with ED. Studley not only emphasized the critical partnership for learning between art and other classroom subjects, such as chemistry and history, she also noted the importance of art “as a source of inspiration and a way to practice discipline.”

Rebecca Martin Nagy, director of the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida, asserted that art museums worldwide are committed to education. “It’s what we do!” she said, citing the 242 AAMD members that work with each other, 40,000 schools, and community organizations.

Anthony Madorsky, a 10-year-old student artist from Meadowbrook Elementary School in Gainesville, Fla., made family members proud when he delivered remarks on his painting “La Florida.”  He drew inspiration from Frank Hamilton Taylor’s “A Trip on the Ocklawaha,” a painting at the Harn. Anthony explained that he tried to depict “the untouched majestic beauty [of Florida] before the Spanish colonization,” a different way than people usually see Florida. “When Ponce de León discovered Florida, he called it “La Florida,” meaning ‘land full of flowers.’ I believe each of our brains is a ‘La Florida’ as it is a place full of ideas like flower buds and, as people help us improve these ideas, they can bloom into flowers,” Anthony concluded—an eloquent depiction of “becoming educated.”

Anna Mebel, the poet-in-residence at the Harn, also touched on the different portrayals of her home state, Florida—a foreigner’s and a local’s. She recited her original poem, “Florida,” which was inspired by Karen Glaser’s “Within the Swamp, Roberts Lake Strand,” a photograph at the Harn.

Amanda Stambrosky, the choreographer and dancer-in-residence at the Harn, performed an original piece, “Down to the Lake,” to James Vincent McMorrow’s song “The Lakes” in response to four Florida landscape paintings at the Harn. Amanda incorporated her hair in her performance. Midway, she let it loose from the bun she wore as both an expression of “letting loose” and a representation of the movement of the palm trees and wind. For her, concluding the piece by pulling her hair back in a bun portrayed “resuming life, yet kind of changed.”

The program closed with a ribbon-cutting ceremony, an 11-year tradition of ED’s Student Art Exhibit Program to officially open students’ exhibits

“The art is beautiful” and “wow!” were some of the guests’ remarks as they viewed the 67 pieces of work, evidence of creativity and learning in all fields from k–12 students.

The exhibit will be on display through August 31 in the ED headquarters lobby at 400 Maryland Ave. SW. To visit the exhibit, contact Jackye Zimmermann (Jacquelyn.Zimmermann@ed.gov; 202-401-0762).

Click here to see additional photos from the exhibit opening.

Greta Olivares is a rising senior at Middlebury College and a summer intern in the Office of Communications and Outreach at ED.

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