Is Student Loan Consolidation Right For You?

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A Direct Consolidation Loan allows you to combine multiple federal education loans into one loan. Before making the decision to consolidate your loans, you’ll want to carefully consider whether loan consolidation is the best option for you. Keep in mind, once your loans are combined into a Direct Consolidation Loan, they cannot be removed.

Advantages of consolidating your student loans:

  • Simplified Payments
    You’ll have a single monthly payment and a single lender (the U.S. Department of Education) instead of multiple payments and multiple lenders.
  • It’s free!
    It’s free to apply to consolidate your federal student loans. If you are contacted by someone offering to consolidate your loans for a fee, you are not dealing with the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Fixed Interest Rate
    Direct Consolidation Loans have a fixed interest rate, meaning your interest rate won’t change year to year. The fixed interest rate is based on the weighted average of the interest rates on the loans being consolidated, rounded up to the nearest one-eighth of 1%.
  • Lower Monthly Payments
    You may get a longer time to repay your loans, often resulting in lower monthly payments.

Disadvantages of consolidating your student loans:

  • Loss of Borrower Benefits
    You may lose any borrower benefits, such as interest rate discounts, principal rebates, or some loan cancellation benefits, offered with the original loans.
  • More Interest Paid Over Time
    You will likely pay more money in interest over the life of the loan. The amount of time you have to repay your Direct Consolidation Loan can vary from 10-30 years depending on the amount of your Direct Consolidation Loan and the amount of your other student loan debt. The longer it takes to repay your loan, the more you will make in interest payments.

In weighing your options, be sure to compare your current monthly payments to what your monthly payments would be if you consolidated your loans. If you’re just interested in temporarily lowering your monthly payment, consolidation might not be the answer.  Contact your loan servicer to consider alternative options such as deferment or forbearance.

To find out more information about loan consolidation, including eligibility requirements, visit https://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/consolidation.

Tara Marini is a communication analyst at the Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid.

3 Comments

  1. One other thing is that an online business administration training is designed for learners to be able to well proceed to bachelor’s degree courses. The 90 credit certification meets the lower bachelor college degree requirements then when you earn the associate of arts in BA online, you will have access to up to date technologies in such a field. Some reasons why students need to get their associate degree in business is because they are interested in this area and want to find the general schooling necessary prior to jumping to a bachelor diploma program. Thanks alot : ) for the tips you actually provide within your blog.

  2. I’ve already consolidated my federal loans. Is there any way to consolidate private student loans because that is what’s killing me – I’m making 5 different payments, with different interest rates, to 5 different servicers plus the federal consolidation loan payment to one of the servicers.

    Please help!!

  3. I have student loans under Debra Buening and Debra Smith with this department and several others. I started making payments to each loan seperately and that lasted about 2 months. I was unable to keep up with the payments and am now receiving threats. I really need to consolidate these loans with my University of Oklahoma loans to be able to make any progress with paying them off. Can this be done?

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