ED launches new, mobile-optimized site: StudentAid.gov

If you’re a student thinking about college or career school or a borrower already in repayment, the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid has launched some exciting new tools to help you through the financial aid process.

StudentAid.gov is a new website that provides straightforward and easy-to-understand information about planning and paying for college. The site combines content and interactive tools from several ED websites.

StudentAid.gov offers more than just information in an easy-to-read format; it also features videos and infographics to help answer the most frequently asked questions about financial aid.

As a mobile-optimized website, StudentAid.gov is fully accessible on tablets and smartphones. StudentAid.gov’s new look was tested with students, parents and borrowers, and we will continue to make improvements and updates based on your feedback.

Some New Features

Income-Based Repayment Calculator: If your student loan debt is high but your income is modest, you may qualify for the Income-Based Repayment Plan (IBR). To find out whether you might be eligible to repay your loan under IBR, use our new IBR calculator.

Videos: We’ve developed videos to help make the financial aid process easier to understand. We’ll continue to roll out new videos and update our playlists on the Federal Student Aid YouTube channel.

Infographics: Our infographics will help you understand what steps you need to take to get money for college or career school.

Social Media: In addition to StudentAid.gov, Federal Student Aid has also launched Twitter, Facebook and YouTube to offer you alternative options to learn about the student aid process.

Learn More at #AskFAFSA Office Hours

If you would like to learn more about these new resources, @usedgov will be interviewing @FAFSA on Twitter on July 25th at 6pm ET to highlight some of the helpful new features that are available. Whether you’re just starting to think about college or career school, currently enrolled or in the repayment process, we encourage you to join the conversation.

Here’s how it works:

- Have suggestions or questions about the new resources that are available? You can start submitting them on Twitter today. Be sure to include the #AskFAFSA hashtag in your tweets. We’ll continue to take questions throughout the week and during the live event.

- On Wednesday, July 25th, at 6pm ET, follow @usedgov & @FAFSA or the #AskFAFSA hashtag on Twitter to join the conversation. Suggestions and questions are encouraged!

- Can’t make the live session? A summary of #AskFAFSA Office Hours, including the full Q&A, will be posted on Storify and the ED.gov blog following the event.

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/NCGXVY

4 Comments

  1. My 20 year old nephew lives with us and is independent by IRS. He is not claimed as a dependent on our taxes (CT) or his mother in (NC) and receives no support from us or his mother. His father is deceased. His mother lost her job and house and almost homeless. Unemployment has run out. We give her son a shared room with my son and he pays for food and utilities weekly with his part time minimum wage job. He wants to get ahead and go to school. He is a smart kid. Transportation to and from is an issue but is willing to commute to local school. Can the federal government justify having a twenty year old kid as a dependent because of your own rules versus the IRS terms for dependent? This is not right and needs to be reviewed.

  2. My 20 year old nephew lives with us and is independent by IRS. He is not claimed as a dependent on our taxes (CT) or his mother in (NC) and receives no support from us or his mother. His father is deceased. His mother lost her job and house and almost homeless. Unemployment has run out. We give her son a shared room with my son and he pays for food and utilities weekly with his part time minimum wage job. He wants to get ahead and go to school. He is a smart kid. Transportation to and from is an issue but is willing to commute to local school. Can the federal government justify having a twenty year old kid as a dependent because of your own rules versus the IRS terms for dependent? This is not right and needs to be reviewed.

  3. Dear sir,

    I am writing to request a new pin to complete my exit interview process for my education, and would be very happy if you send me a new one as soon as possible.

    Thank you.

  4. Recently I heard that Congress is considering forgiveness of past student loans. Is this true? When the call went out for highly qualified teachers, I, as did many of my colleagues, began second careers obtaining special education, highly qualified, teaching certifications. As we all know, teachers are in abundance and so are the pink slips. I am drowning in student loan debt and haven’t been able to keep up with payments. Any good news out there?

Comments are closed.