Obama in Michigan: Views from a Teacher and Parent

… The degree you earn from Michigan will be the best tool you have to achieve that basic American promise … be part of something that is adding value to this country and maybe changing the world.  …That’s what the American Dream is all about.  

My grandfather got the chance to go to college because this country decided that every returning veteran of World War II should be able to afford it.  My mother was able to raise two kids by herself because she was able to get grants and work her way through school.  I am only standing here today because scholarships and student loans gave me a shot at a decent education.”

When President Obama spoke these words to the crowd at the University of Michigan on Friday, he described the situation of many students in the audience who struggle to pay for the education they’ll need to participate in the American Dream. Like the President, I have two daughters of whom I am very proud, and both are fortunate to attend the University of Michigan.

Tracey with Secretary Duncan in Michigan

Tracey with Secretary Duncan at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor before President Obama's speech.

As a high school teacher in Ann Arbor and a single parent who is solely responsible for my daughters’ tuition bills, I welcome the President’s plans in the “Blueprint for an America Built to Last” to make college more affordable for families like ours. Everyday I worry about the debt my girls will have when they graduate. Expanding work study opportunities and keeping interest rates low on federal loans will be crucial to my daughters’ and other students’ ability to finish college. As the President said, “… In this economy, there is no greater predictor of individual success than a good education.”

Fortunately, thanks to the President’s support for manufacturing and the auto industry, the Michigan economy is starting to recover, and I agree with the President that the United States has to continue to be a country where everybody has a chance to succeed, and affordable education is the key to that goal.

As a 2010 Classroom Teaching Ambassador Fellow with the Department of Education, I have experienced Secretary Duncan and President Obama’s commitment to having teachers at the table in policy discussions.  Through the fellowship, I have had unique opportunities to engage in meaningful conversations with diverse groups of educators and policy makers. These were all great experiences.  When I met President Obama after the speech, and he thanked me for my work, I was immensely grateful both for the chance of a lifetime and for an administration that clearly values teachers and education.

Tracey Van Dusen

Tracey Van Dusen is a 2010 Classroom Teaching Ambassador Fellow who teaches AP Government and American Studies at Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

1 Comment

  1. Since federal loans cover only a small portion of college costs, it is just as important to make available to all students low interest, fixed rate private student loans with deferred repayment plans. Both the current and future costs of college attendance should be addressed if this federal education initiative is really about getting more students to attend college regardless of socio-economic backgrounds.

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