Community College Summit in Philadelphia

ED is holding a regional community college summit in Philadelphia on February 28.

Secretary Duncan and Labor Secretary Hilda Solis will participate in the summit, which is the first of four regional meetings being held as follow-up events to the White House Summit on Community Colleges in October 2010.

The Philadelphia summit — “Challenges, Solutions, and Commitments” — will bring together 150 participants from 15 surrounding states, representing community colleges, business, industry, philanthropy, labor, state and local governments, as well as students. The summit focus is “Transitioning Adult Learners to Community Colleges and the Workforce.”

The morning session will be streamed live (from 9:00 am – 12:15 pm ET).

The remaining three regional meetings will be held around the country during the spring. The purpose of the meetings is to identify promising practices for increasing completion at community colleges.

Duncan has described community colleges as the linchpin for meeting the President’s national goal of once again leading the world in college completion by 2020.

While they’re in Philadelphia, Duncan and Solis will tour the 1199C Training and Upgrading Fund’s Learning Center, a joint labor-management partnership that provides job skills training in the health fields to over 2,000 adult students every year.

ED Staff

4 Comments

  1. I hope that the discussion of issues about this summit will reduce the unemployment rate nowadays.

  2. With low FICO scores attached to college students now, many having by-passed repaying their student LOANS, the process of individual growth will remain stagnant for years to come.???

  3. While I agree that there is a need for change, the fact remains that higher education still operates like it’s the 1980s! With advance technology advancing still, many colleges are still functioning with 1990s technology. The sad part is that today’s college student will only end up in heavy debt, unable to keep pace with rising tuition costs. Pell Grants, while plenty, are slowed, especially with regards to “maximum ELIGIBLE to receive”. With no jobs available, college students can’t even obtain an under-grad degree, having to borrow to meet tuition costs, only to discover that there are no jobs, no “pot of gold” waiting for them at the end. The only thing waiting is heavy debt loads, with no prominent employment available there-after. With low FICO scores attached to college students now, many having by-passed repaying their student LOANS, the process of individual growth will remain stagnant for years to come.

  4. I sincerely hope that attendees will address the pervasive problem of the exploitation of adjunct faculty in higher education and in community colleges in particular. These instructors are being actively prevented from doing their jobs as effectively as they can because they receive poverty-level wages, almost no access to benefits, and erratic institutional support. There is no way to accomplish the goals that the administration has set for higher education if community colleges and policymakers continue to ignore this problem, which degrades the profession of college teaching and erodes the middle class.

    Our organization is actively trying to bring all stakeholders together to confront this problem and begin working toward a practical, ethical solution.

    Maria Maisto
    President, New Faculty Majority: The National Coalition for Adjunct and Contingent Equity

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