Duncan Praises New York’s Race to the Top Plan

Duncan Praises New York’s Race to the Top Plan

Secretary Duncan speaks at a press conference with New York Gov. David Paterson and other state leaders.

At the first stop on the second half of the “Courage in the Classroom” tour, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan praised New York leaders for state’s remarkably bold vision for reforming schools.

New York was one of 10 winners in the second phase of the Race to the Top program. Peer reviewers gave the state the second highest score in the competition.

Secretary Duncan made the comments at a press conference led by Gov. David Paterson and joined by leaders from across the state.

Duncan Praises New York’s Race to the Top Plan

Secretary Duncan exits the "Courage in the Classroom" bus at the New York state Capitol.


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6 Comments

  1. while i want to agree with Glen’s comment and support of uniforms, i am not sure that i would solve problems that young people as they are trying to determine their social order. The problems is that young peoples social order is modeled on the real world, so restricting expression would probably only create a more pernicious, sublimated version of the same issues around appearance.

    -jean

  2. My Mistake with my 28-year-old son, I meant to give his proper age of 18-years old, but pressed the wrong number. Age can make a difference:)

  3. I think the propossal of uniformed schools are the greatest effort in lessening the peer pressure, bullying, and low self-esteem of students. Most students are ridiculed daily. I know because I have an 28-year-old who dropped out for this reason alone, (he constantly complained he could not wear his best color red, because of the relation to gang members), I also have a 7-year-old and 10-year-old who are in the second and fifth grade and come home most days very dissapointed with other aspects of school which almost ALWAYS comes down to being made fun of because of what they have to wear. I attend an online college because I cannot fathom the affect these problems would have on me now even as an adult! I think this propossal is EXCELLENT! And wish it would go through!

  4. This administration has done more in the last 12 months than I have witnessed in the last 12 years. Regardless of what some say about the efficacy of these changes, it is abundantly clear that the status quo was simply not working for the vast majority of students.

  5. I am all for education. For generations my family has had teachers in it. When my oldest wanted to drop out of high school I obviously was opposed to it. However, after listening to EVERY teacher at a supposedly high standards school tell me my son knew more about each topic than they did when attended conferences and he was bored to the point of school being a waste of time I finally agreed he could drop out, get a GED and move on to college. When my second son tried to complete his senior year in Minnesota he was told he would have to return to 10th Grade because he had not taken the MINNESOTA standardized test and the Wisconsin test he had taken in 10th Grade would not count. Considering he was already in college level classes while in high school there was no point in regressing. Not everyone that drops out does so because of being a lazy or unmotivated to learn.

  6. I BELIEVE EVERYONE IS MISSING THE POINT ON EDUCATION. MOST WARS ARE ABOUT THE HALVES AND HAVE NOTS. EDUCATION IS MUCH THE SAME. POOR SCHOOL DISTRICTS DO WORSE THAN MORE AFFLUENT DISTRICTS. THEY ATTRACT THE BEST TEACHERS, HAVE THE BEST SURROUNDINGS ETC, I AM 73 YEARS OLD AND GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL IN 1955. MY FAMILY WAS VERY POOR AND THERE WEREN’T ANY TITLE MONEY FLOATING AROUND. HAVING TO PUT FRESH CARDBOARD IN MY SHOES EVERY MORE TO COVER THE HOLES IN MY SHOES WAS THE NORM. CLOTHS WERE USED SOMETIME WELL USED. I WORKED IN THE CAFETERIA THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL FOR MY LUNCH. YOU CAN HIDE HUNGER, BUT YOU CAN’T HIDE YOUR APPEARANCE WHICH IS MUCH MORE COMPETITIVE TODAY THAN 50+ YEARS AGO. MANY FAMILIES DO WITHOUT SO THEIR CHILD CAN HAVE EXPENSIVE TENNIS SHOES OR AN EXPENSIVE PURSE OR DESIGNER JEANS ETC. MANY MAKE DO WITH WHAT EVER THEY HAVE. I CAN’T REMEMBER A DAY IN WHICH I WASN’T EMBARRASSED WITH MY CLOTHS. NEVER HAD BREAKFAST AND WASN’T MUCH AFTER I GOT HOME. WORKING FOR MY LUNCH WAS A GOD SEND. ALL THE TITLE MONIES AVAILABLE HAS HELPED THE LOW INCOME FAMILIES CHILDREN FAKE IT PRETTY WELL AT SCHOOL BUT THERE STILL IS THE CLOTHING ISSUE. SOME SCHOOLS YOU CAN’T WEAR CERTAIN COLORS BECAUSE OF GANGS CLAIM A CERTAIN COLOR. KIDS CLOTHS ARE STOLEN AS WELL AS SHOES. AROUND THE WORLD AND IN MANY PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN THE U.S., KIDS WEAR UNIFORMS AND SEEM TO DO MUCH BETTER IN SCHOOL, BETTER DISCIPLINED KIDS IN THE CLASS ROOM ETC. THEY CAN BETTER CONCENTRATE ON LEARNING BECAUSE THEY HAVE BETTER ESTEEM ABOUT THEMSELVES AND NOT HAVING TO COMPLETE. I REMEMBER OVERHEARING A KID TEASING ANOTHER THAT HE HAD LAST YEARS SHIRT ON. UNIFORMS WOULD TAKE THE BURDEN OFF THE PARENTS FROM HAVING TO BUY DESIGNER CLOTHS ETC. SO THEIR CHILD MIGHT ESCAPE SOME TYPE OF EMBARRASSMENT. FROM THE WAY THEY DRESS. SELF ESTEEM IS EVERYTHING AT THE SCHOOL AGE. MANDATORY SCHOOL UNIFORMS FOR ALL STUDENTS K-12 WOULD SOLVE 75% OF THE
    LEARNING AND DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM AND IT WOULD BE SO EASY TO IMPLEMENT. I KNOW ITS BEEN TALKED ABOUT FOR YEARS BUT NOTHING IS EVER DONE. THE GOVERNMENT COULD SUBSIDIZE SOME LOW INCOME PARENTS IF THAT IS A PROBLEM, BUT I WOULD THINK IT WOULD SAVE ALL PARENTS MONEY IN THE LONG RUN ESPECIALLY LOW INCOME PARENTS. I WOULD HOPE YOU WOULD TAKE A LOOK AT THIS SUGGESTION. I CAN TELL YOU FROM EXPERIENCE THAT UNIFORMS ARE THE ANSWER TO MUCH OF THE SCHOOLS PROBLEMS. IT DON’T MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE IF YOU ARE IN THE MOST MODERN CLASS ROOM IN THE WORLD OR IN ONE WHERE THE PAINT IS FALLING OF THE CEILINGS. IF YOU ARE SITTING THERE THINKING ABOUT YOUR APPEARANCE AND NOT THE TEACHER AND THE LESSONS, THE DECO RE DOESN’T MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE. HOPE YOU WILL GIVE THIS LETTER A LOT OF THOUGHT. GLEN WALTERS

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